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Best Of Atlanta 2012 Poets Artists Large


Poets, Artists & Madmen


Best play BOA Award Winner

Year » 2012
Section » Print Features » Special Issue » Best of Atlanta » 2012 » Poets, Artists, & Madmen » Readers Pick
The Goat Farm Arts Center

Best public art event BOA Award Winner

Year » 2012
Section » Print Features » Special Issue » Best of Atlanta » 2012 » Poets, Artists, & Madmen » Readers Pick
Flux

Best public artwork BOA Award Winner

Year » 2012
Section » Print Features » Special Issue » Best of Atlanta » 2012 » Poets, Artists, & Madmen » Readers Pick
Living Walls

Best reason to hole up in a cardboard box BOA Award Winner

Year » 2012
Section » Print Features » Special Issue » Best of Atlanta » 2012 » Poets, Artists, & Madmen » Critics Pick
Threshold
Even creating the sparest of shows in the humblest of venues can be a financial and logistical challenge for many Atlanta dance companies, so it was especially impressive to see the Lucky Penny produce Threshold in August. Blake Beckham's ambitious vision included a performance for three dancers in amore...
Even creating the sparest of shows in the humblest of venues can be a financial and logistical challenge for many Atlanta dance companies, so it was especially impressive to see the Lucky Penny produce Threshold in August. Blake Beckham's ambitious vision included a performance for three dancers in a structurally sound two-story house made entirely of cardboard. The innovative dream team of architects Mack Scogin and Merrill Elam designed the house, and more than 100 visual artists, designers, and volunteers helped realize the project with more than 50,000 square feet of paper products. The cardboard architecture provided a fascinating, dreamlike setting for Beckham's primal and visceral contemplation of interior and exterior spaces. The show unequivocally raised the bar for what's possible for independent dance in Atlanta. www.theluckypennyatl.blogspot.com. less...

Best reinvention of the reading series BOA Award Winner

Year » 2012
Section » Print Features » Special Issue » Best of Atlanta » 2012 » Poets, Artists, & Madmen » Critics Pick
PushPush Arts
Reading is a quiet, solitary pursuit, generally reserved for moments of peace, reflection - of not yelling, as it were. And yet, there exists Write Club, a bombastic crew of yellers, hooters, and hollerers that gathers the second Wednesday of every month at the Red Room in Decatur to wage literarymore...
Reading is a quiet, solitary pursuit, generally reserved for moments of peace, reflection - of not yelling, as it were. And yet, there exists Write Club, a bombastic crew of yellers, hooters, and hollerers that gathers the second Wednesday of every month at the Red Room in Decatur to wage literary warfare at a piercing decibel. Consigliere Myke Johns and Viceroy Nicholas Tecosky helm the rowdy bunch, which comes to witness three wordy bouts, each a face-off between two different readers. The readers prepare original works based on opposing themes - lost vs. found, sink vs. swim - and have seven minutes to perform. Combatants battle for honor and charity, with a blue ribbon panel deciding the winners based on the precise science of listening to audience applause. It's fun, it's loud, and the stories are damn good. $10-$25 donation. 627 E. College Ave., Decatur. www.writeclubatlanta.com. less...

Best rising theater company BOA Award Winner

Year » 2012
Section » Print Features » Special Issue » Best of Atlanta » 2012 » Poets, Artists, & Madmen » Critics Pick
For a new company to produce a distinguished season at a time of crisis for Atlanta theater is an especially impressive feat. As established theaters are struggling financially or shuttering, Fabrefaction Theatre has managed to become a formidable presence. In its third season, the small theater in Westmore...
For a new company to produce a distinguished season at a time of crisis for Atlanta theater is an especially impressive feat. As established theaters are struggling financially or shuttering, Fabrefaction Theatre has managed to become a formidable presence. In its third season, the small theater in West Midtown, founded by Christina and Evelyn Hoff, showed its range in the 2011-2012 season with a bloody and creepy Sweeney Todd, a Christmas-themed Rocky Horror Show, a smart, witty, in-the-round Tartuffe, and a musical Titanic. Cool shows, snazzy lobby, educational programs, productions for kids, a great theater space, and a black box to boot. The whole package helped the theater solidify a faithful core audience while reaching out to new ones. less...

Best run of the show BOA Award Winner

Year » 2012
Section » Print Features » Special Issue » Best of Atlanta » 2012 » Poets, Artists, & Madmen » Critics Pick
In March, the board of directors of Theatre in the Square voted to close the cash-strapped playhouse against the wishes of its founder and producing director Palmer Wells. Even in less acrimonious circumstances, the loss of the Marietta-based playhouse would have been a painful blow. In 1982, Wells andmore...
In March, the board of directors of Theatre in the Square voted to close the cash-strapped playhouse against the wishes of its founder and producing director Palmer Wells. Even in less acrimonious circumstances, the loss of the Marietta-based playhouse would have been a painful blow. In 1982, Wells and partner Michael Horne launched the theater, which quickly seemed to find the ideal balance between audience-pleasing chestnuts like the oft-remounted musical Smoke on the Mountain and provocative new works, including Martin McDonagh's The Beauty Queen of Leenane and Richard Greenburg's Take Me Out. Despite a 1993 dispute with the Cobb County Commission, which withdrew its funding for all arts over the theater's production of the gay-themed Lips Together, Teeth Apart, Theatre in the Square was clearly a home away from home for its subscribers and long-time model for small local theaters. less...

Best showbiz shout out to Atlanta BOA Award Winner

Year » 2012
Section » Print Features » Special Issue » Best of Atlanta » 2012 » Poets, Artists, & Madmen » Readers Pick
"The Walking Dead"

Best sign the Beltline is ready for movement BOA Award Winner

Year » 2012
Section » Print Features » Special Issue » Best of Atlanta » 2012 » Poets, Artists, & Madmen » Critics Pick
Dance on the Beltline
The streetcar isn't quite here yet, but dance on the Beltline certainly sparked our imagination about the potential for new movement in the city. In the last year, dancer/choreographer Helen Hale, with local arts organization Dashboard Co-op, hosted the abundant dance feast Anti-Manners; gloATL exploredmore...
The streetcar isn't quite here yet, but dance on the Beltline certainly sparked our imagination about the potential for new movement in the city. In the last year, dancer/choreographer Helen Hale, with local arts organization Dashboard Co-op, hosted the abundant dance feast Anti-Manners; gloATL explored a sewer overflow facility in Float; the dancers of Crossover Movement Arts dressed as steampunk time-travelers and grooved to the improvisational jazz of the Zentropy ensemble; and Beacon Dance explored the element of earth as part of its Elemental Project. All of them got us ready to get moving, too. www.beltline.org. less...

Best stage director BOA Award Winner

Year » 2012
Section » Print Features » Special Issue » Best of Atlanta » 2012 » Poets, Artists, & Madmen » Readers Pick
Marium Khalid

Best street art BOA Award Winner

Year » 2012
Section » Print Features » Special Issue » Best of Atlanta » 2012 » Poets, Artists, & Madmen » Readers Pick
Living Walls

Best theater company BOA Award Winner

Year » 2012
Section » Print Features » Special Issue » Best of Atlanta » 2012 » Poets, Artists, & Madmen » Critics Pick
Theatrical Outfit
Downtown Atlanta's Theatrical Outfit enters its 35th anniversary season on a roll, having staged one of the best plays in its recent history with Red. Artistic director Tom Key, normally the sunniest of actors, gave a moody, impassioned performance as painter Mark Rothko, with Jimi Kocina keeping upmore...
Downtown Atlanta's Theatrical Outfit enters its 35th anniversary season on a roll, having staged one of the best plays in its recent history with Red. Artistic director Tom Key, normally the sunniest of actors, gave a moody, impassioned performance as painter Mark Rothko, with Jimi Kocina keeping up as a hungry young apprentice eager to learn and to challenge the celebrity artist's ideas about creativity and integrity. On the other the side of the coin, the terrific family show A Wrinkle in Time offered a fusion of whimsical characters, imaginative design, and a potentially disturbing theme about the power of totalitarianism. Even such lesser shows as Freud's Last Session and the world premiere of The Green Book featured impeccable acting and a willingness to engage audiences with potent, heady ideas. The Outfit's home at the Balzer Theater gives theater fans the best reason to visit downtown. less...

Best theatre company BOA Award Winner

Year » 2012
Section » Print Features » Special Issue » Best of Atlanta » 2012 » Poets, Artists, & Madmen » Readers Pick
Dad's Garage Theatre

Best touring play BOA Award Winner

Year » 2012
Section » Print Features » Special Issue » Best of Atlanta » 2012 » Poets, Artists, & Madmen » Readers Pick
Wicked

Best visiting artist BOA Award Winner

Year » 2012
Section » Print Features » Special Issue » Best of Atlanta » 2012 » Poets, Artists, & Madmen » Critics Pick
Alliance Theatre
The Tony Award-winning Alliance Theatre won another feather for its cap when novelist Stephen King and roots rocker John Mellencamp chose the Atlanta playhouse for the world premiere of their new musical, Ghost Brothers of Darkland County. When Ghost Brothers made its long-awaited debut in April, themore...
The Tony Award-winning Alliance Theatre won another feather for its cap when novelist Stephen King and roots rocker John Mellencamp chose the Atlanta playhouse for the world premiere of their new musical, Ghost Brothers of Darkland County. When Ghost Brothers made its long-awaited debut in April, the show's MVP proved to be T Bone Burnett as music director. Thanks to the legendary music producer and his sound design team, Ghost Brothers' tale of intergenerational family secrets sounded like a dream, with possibly the richest instrumentation and most crystalline audio clarity the Alliance Theatre has ever delivered. Burnett ensured that Ghost Brothers became a kind of sonic spectacle, from its hammering, world-shaking blues numbers to rollicking country-and-Western tunes to its supernatural sound effects. Now how can we get him back? less...
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