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Jaye Newton's rhythmic rap

Newton’s music emphasizes individuality

Photo credit: Courtesy Jaye Newton

Jaye Newton's rhythmic rap styles make waves both in and outside of the city. Hailing from Ellenwood, Georgia, his eclectic energy has led him to a theme of "vibey” hip-hop that’s appropriate for a wide range of chill settings. 

Since 2012, Newton’s music has emphasized individuality. He proudly reps the Eastside, but his sound doesn’t fit within the overcrowded confines of the region. Diverging from the trapper typecast with which Atlanta rappers are acquainted, Newton takes pride in his own authentic brand. Choosing love and leisure over drugs and money, he has a playful presence similar to Big Sean’s and a knack for storytelling comparable to that of J. Cole or Andre 3000. “Everyone sounds the same and it kills people to be themselves,” he says. “In this post-trap era, we've lost the root of what makes Atlanta music ‘Atlanta Music,’ which is being innovative and true to self.”

Between his well-tailored album titles and love for bass-lined beats, it’s no secret that Newton’s music is meant for car speakers. From the inaugural release of "Tapes in My Toyota” to the most recent “Sunroof Season,” he's spanned five projects in as many years. He often relies on his synesthesia (Newton hears colors) to create, as he did when he found inspiration for his fourth project, Real Men Wear Pink, in the vulnerability of a failed love life. As his impact expands further beyond Atlanta, Newton’s sound continues carries a youthful, positive beat.



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Article

Monday June 25, 2018 10:33 am EDT
'The T. Mason EP' combines old-school flow with millennial rhymes with caption-worthy punchlines | more...
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  string(2854) "There isn’t anything stopping Yung Baby Tate from shining as one of the brightest stars in Atlanta’s subversive pop, hip-hop, and R&B music scenes.

Playing on her name and youthful nature, the singer’s music is often as colorful as her kiddie-chic wardrobe. Her delivery treads a fine line between pop and rap music. Her growth has been constant since her journey as a producer began in 2009. She’s coined a bold, conversational tone that gives her voice the swagger of a rapper while still maintaining a melody.

Her Boys EP, released in May, marks the furthest the singer has ventured into the depths of hip-hop, with lyrical tracks like “Bubba Gump” and songs like “Beckham” showcasing the wide range of her abilities as a vocalist.
Her connection to music runs deep, considering her mother Dionne Farris, a singer/songwriter, has been a contributor to the city’s music culture since the ’90s. Tate was born, raised, and influenced by Atlanta’s music scene.
“I was in the third grade when ‘Laffy Taffy’ by D4L came out,” Tate says. 
The 2005 club hit’s snap-era production bears a heavy influence on her latest single, “Pretty Girl.”

“I’ve been growing up in the motherland of pop culture since 1996,” she adds.
Though she picked up music at a young age, Yung Baby Tate, born Tate Farris, made her official debut in 2015 with the release of her first project, ROYGBIV, and has since been the sole songwriter and producer throughout most of her discography. Her most impressive quality, if not her ability to engineer her own sound from start to finish, is her candor on the topic of female sexuality.
She’s made it her mission to redirect the hip-hop narrative that’s lessened the agenda of the promiscuous woman by normalizing feminine, sexual language. “I always want to be a positive influence through my music, so I like to find the things that bring me joy, and convert it into art,” she says.

“Looking back at my music then and being able to compare that to my music now is always inspiring to me,” she goes on to say. “I don’t think we’re ever done growing. There’s always something new to learn or something old you might need to relearn, so you can just keep leveling up on yourself.”

This approach is a recurring theme of her Cuddy Buddy EP, a project she used to express her own sexual prowess. “I have always found it bizarre that sexually liberated men get praised, but sexually liberated women get shamed,” Tate says. “I think a big part of that social standard has to do with the media, specifically music, training people to think that way. Cuddy Buddy,” she adds, “was a conversation that you might usually hear coming from a man’s perspective but, I freaked it.” -C-



Yung Baby Tate is on the road with Bali Baby this summer."
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  string(3318) " Music YBT18 1 11  2018-06-07T20:01:26+00:00 Music_YBT18-1_11.jpg     The rising pop singer redefines bold sexuality 6374  2018-06-07T19:56:47+00:00 Yung Baby Tate blossoms chad.radford@creativeloafing.com Chad Radford Ashley Vance  2018-06-07T19:56:47+00:00  There isn’t anything stopping Yung Baby Tate from shining as one of the brightest stars in Atlanta’s subversive pop, hip-hop, and R&B music scenes.

Playing on her name and youthful nature, the singer’s music is often as colorful as her kiddie-chic wardrobe. Her delivery treads a fine line between pop and rap music. Her growth has been constant since her journey as a producer began in 2009. She’s coined a bold, conversational tone that gives her voice the swagger of a rapper while still maintaining a melody.

Her Boys EP, released in May, marks the furthest the singer has ventured into the depths of hip-hop, with lyrical tracks like “Bubba Gump” and songs like “Beckham” showcasing the wide range of her abilities as a vocalist.
Her connection to music runs deep, considering her mother Dionne Farris, a singer/songwriter, has been a contributor to the city’s music culture since the ’90s. Tate was born, raised, and influenced by Atlanta’s music scene.
“I was in the third grade when ‘Laffy Taffy’ by D4L came out,” Tate says. 
The 2005 club hit’s snap-era production bears a heavy influence on her latest single, “Pretty Girl.”

“I’ve been growing up in the motherland of pop culture since 1996,” she adds.
Though she picked up music at a young age, Yung Baby Tate, born Tate Farris, made her official debut in 2015 with the release of her first project, ROYGBIV, and has since been the sole songwriter and producer throughout most of her discography. Her most impressive quality, if not her ability to engineer her own sound from start to finish, is her candor on the topic of female sexuality.
She’s made it her mission to redirect the hip-hop narrative that’s lessened the agenda of the promiscuous woman by normalizing feminine, sexual language. “I always want to be a positive influence through my music, so I like to find the things that bring me joy, and convert it into art,” she says.

“Looking back at my music then and being able to compare that to my music now is always inspiring to me,” she goes on to say. “I don’t think we’re ever done growing. There’s always something new to learn or something old you might need to relearn, so you can just keep leveling up on yourself.”

This approach is a recurring theme of her Cuddy Buddy EP, a project she used to express her own sexual prowess. “I have always found it bizarre that sexually liberated men get praised, but sexually liberated women get shamed,” Tate says. “I think a big part of that social standard has to do with the media, specifically music, training people to think that way. Cuddy Buddy,” she adds, “was a conversation that you might usually hear coming from a man’s perspective but, I freaked it.” -C-



Yung Baby Tate is on the road with Bali Baby this summer.    Nate Shula @nateshuls BOYS: Yung Baby Tate’s most impressive quality, if not her engineer skills, is her candor regarding female sexuality.                                   Yung Baby Tate blossoms "
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Article

Thursday June 7, 2018 03:56 pm EDT
The rising pop singer redefines bold sexuality | more...
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  string(67) "The ‘Woo$ah’ rapper brings soulful notoriety to Atlanta hip-hop"
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  string(5004) "Childish Major is an artist whose soothing lyrics often dance to a beat of his own production. Born Markus Randle, Childish Major was born Minnesota and raised in Edgefield, South Carolina, but admits the close proximity with Atlanta influenced his soulful take on hip-hop. After establishing himself as a formidable presence in A-town hip-hop with Rocko’s 2013 single, "U.O.E.N.O." (ft.Rick Ross and Future), the Grammy-nominated artist released his debut solo album, Woo$ah in December 2017. Its title perfectly captures the effects his honeyed rap melodies have on anyone within earshot. Six months after the album’s release via Humility City Records/Empire, Childish Major is still riding a high from the success of songs such as “I Like You” (feat. DRAM & 6lack), “Happy Birthday” (feat. SZA & Isaiah Rashad),” and “Supply Luh” (produced by J. Cole). Before making his next move — whatever it is, he ain’t saying just yet — Childish Major took a few minutes to talk about establishing himself, working with top-tier artists, and his continuous rise to fame.

Let’s begin with your impressive transition from producer to vocalist. Did you always want to be a recording artist, or did you develop a passion for your own music along the way?

For sure, I always wanted to be an artist. But when I was younger, someone told me producers make all the money, so that’s where my focus led. Then, I guess, I saw a window for me to develop my writing skills and pinpoint everything it takes to be an artist.

Are there any tracks you’ve had your hand in that people may not already know about?

SZA’s “Green Mile.” I did the ending of that track, which is also a full song. I don’t know what happened with releasing it (laughs), but her fans are always hitting me up asking ‘bout it. Also, J. Cole’s “4 Your Eyez Only.” That was my first time being credited as a producer working post-production. 

How did you come to meet J. Cole and work on his album?

I met Cole through Earth Gang and J.I.D. They introduced me to him and connected us after he’d heard some stuff I did. He invited me out to the Sheltuh, which is the Dreamville studio house in North Carolina. 

I found out he was going to New York to finish the album, so I bought my own ticket, thinking, “I just gotta be there.” I went with no intention that I was going to be involved. I just wanted to be around and experience the process, but he made sure he kept me in the loop. Sometimes I’d be chillin’ and he’d randomly say something like, “Yo, I think you should go in there and help Elite,” Dreamville’s producer. I didn’t want to impose, so it was good that he reached out and saw a place where I could fit. 

Your debut project, Woo$ah, features a few familiar names. How did collaborations like “I Like You” with DRAM and 6lack come about?

6lack is a good friend, we’ve known each other since before he took off. One day he came back in town and I played him the song. Ended up asking him to get on it, so he did the verse right then and there.

I met DRAM when he was fresh off his “Cha Cha” days. At that point I had a couple songs, but I was kinda trying to figure out if I wanted to be an artist or not. I played “I Like You” for him, and he did a take throughout the whole song. I chopped parts that I liked and placed him in. 

What about your track with two of TDE’s finest? Describe the process of recording “Happy Birthday” with SZA and Isaiah Rashad

I’d already worked on SZA’s album. There’s always good energy with her. I actually didn’t put her on the song though, that was Isaiah's doing. He and I would send stuff back and forth. He liked “Happy Birthday” enough to where he was going to keep it for himself, so that’s why he put her on the song. Then my birthday came, and I was like, “Man, I kinda wanna just drop it,” so I did. 

You moved to Atlanta in 2011. How did working with inner-city acts like Two-9 provide a platform for the success we’ve seen up to this point?

For me, it was probably just as influential as producing “U.O.E.N.O.” with Rocko, Rick Ross, and Future. With that song, I was getting attention high up within the industry, but producing for artists like Two-9 and Rome Fortune gave me like, the base level of notoriety that I needed. 

Do you think Atlanta’s networking scene has had a direct influence on the widespread talent throughout the city? 

Atlanta’s networking scene allows newcomers to dive straight in and meet people who are doing things within the industry already. The Atlanta creatives I met before touching down are the ones who passed on the news about me to others. It definitely played a big part in my career. 

Is there anything we should look forward to in the near future?

More music and more collabs. I can’t say with who yet, but be on the lookout!

Childish Major plays the A3C Hip-Hop festival Oct. 6-7."
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~~#000000:__Let’s begin with your impressive transition from producer to vocalist. Did you always want to be a recording artist, or did you develop a passion for your own music along the way?__~~

~~#000000:For sure, I always wanted to be an artist. But when I was younger, someone told me producers make all the money, so that’s where my focus led. Then, I guess, I saw a window for me to develop my writing skills and pinpoint everything it takes to be an artist.~~

~~#000000:__Are there any tracks you’ve had your hand in that people may not already know about?__~~

~~#000000:SZA’s “Green Mile.” I did the ending of that track, which is also a full song. I don’t know what happened with releasing it (laughs), but her fans are always hitting me up asking ‘bout it. Also, J. Cole’s “4 Your Eyez Only.” That was my first time being credited as a producer working post-production. ~~

~~#000000:__How did you come to meet J. Cole and work on his album?__~~

~~#000000:I met Cole through Earth Gang and J.I.D. They introduced me to him and connected us after he’d heard some stuff I did. He invited me out to the Sheltuh, which is the Dreamville studio house in North Carolina. ~~

~~#000000:I found out he was going to New York to finish the album, so I bought my own ticket, thinking, “I just gotta be there.” I went with no intention that I was going to be involved. I just wanted to be around and experience the process, but he made sure he kept me in the loop. Sometimes I’d be chillin’ and he’d randomly say something like, “Yo, I think you should go in there and help Elite,” Dreamville’s producer. I didn’t want to impose, so it was good that he reached out and saw a place where I could fit. ~~

~~#000000:__Your debut project, ''Woo$ah'', features a few familiar names. How did collaborations like “I Like You” with DRAM and 6lack come about?__~~

~~#000000:6lack is a good friend, we’ve known each other since before ~~[[he took off]~~#000000:. One day he came back in town and I played him the song. Ended up asking him to get on it, so he did the verse right then and there.~~

~~#000000:I met DRAM when he was fresh off his “Cha Cha” days. At that point I had a couple songs, but I was kinda trying to figure out if I wanted to be an artist or not. I played “I Like You” for him, and he did a take throughout the whole song. I chopped parts that I liked and placed him in. ~~

~~#000000:__What about your track with two of TDE’s finest? Describe the process of recording “Happy Birthday” with SZA and Isaiah Rashad__~~

~~#000000:I’d already worked on SZA’s album. There’s always good energy with her. I actually didn’t put her on the song though, that was Isaiah's doing. He and I would send stuff back and forth. He liked “Happy Birthday” enough to where he was going to keep it for himself, so that’s why he put her on the song. Then my birthday came, and I was like, “Man, I kinda wanna just drop it,” so I did. ~~

~~#000000:__You moved to Atlanta in 2011. How did working with inner-city acts like Two-9 provide a platform for the success we’ve seen up to this point?__~~

~~#000000:For me, it was probably just as influential as producing “U.O.E.N.O.” with Rocko, Rick Ross, and Future. With ~~[[that song]~~#000000:, I was getting attention high up within the industry, but producing for artists like Two-9 and Rome Fortune gave me like, the base level of notoriety that I needed. ~~

~~#000000:__Do you think Atlanta’s networking scene has had a direct influence on the widespread talent throughout the city? __~~

~~#000000:Atlanta’s networking scene allows newcomers to dive straight in and meet people who are doing things within the industry already. The Atlanta creatives I met before touching down are the ones who passed on the news about me to others. It definitely played a big part in my career. ~~

~~#000000:__Is there anything we should look forward to in the near future?__~~

~~#000000:More music and more collabs. I can’t say with who yet, but be on the lookout!~~

''[http://www.a3cfestival.com/|~~#000000:Childish Major plays the A3C Hip-Hop festival Oct. 6-7.~~]''"
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  string(5463) " Music Woo$ah5 1 11  2018-06-07T11:07:09+00:00 Music_Woo$ah5-1_11.jpg     The ‘Woo$ah’ rapper brings soulful notoriety to Atlanta hip-hop 6288  2018-06-07T11:00:13+00:00 Childish Major rising chad.radford@creativeloafing.com Chad Radford Ashley Vance  2018-06-07T11:00:13+00:00  Childish Major is an artist whose soothing lyrics often dance to a beat of his own production. Born Markus Randle, Childish Major was born Minnesota and raised in Edgefield, South Carolina, but admits the close proximity with Atlanta influenced his soulful take on hip-hop. After establishing himself as a formidable presence in A-town hip-hop with Rocko’s 2013 single, "U.O.E.N.O." (ft.Rick Ross and Future), the Grammy-nominated artist released his debut solo album, Woo$ah in December 2017. Its title perfectly captures the effects his honeyed rap melodies have on anyone within earshot. Six months after the album’s release via Humility City Records/Empire, Childish Major is still riding a high from the success of songs such as “I Like You” (feat. DRAM & 6lack), “Happy Birthday” (feat. SZA & Isaiah Rashad),” and “Supply Luh” (produced by J. Cole). Before making his next move — whatever it is, he ain’t saying just yet — Childish Major took a few minutes to talk about establishing himself, working with top-tier artists, and his continuous rise to fame.

Let’s begin with your impressive transition from producer to vocalist. Did you always want to be a recording artist, or did you develop a passion for your own music along the way?

For sure, I always wanted to be an artist. But when I was younger, someone told me producers make all the money, so that’s where my focus led. Then, I guess, I saw a window for me to develop my writing skills and pinpoint everything it takes to be an artist.

Are there any tracks you’ve had your hand in that people may not already know about?

SZA’s “Green Mile.” I did the ending of that track, which is also a full song. I don’t know what happened with releasing it (laughs), but her fans are always hitting me up asking ‘bout it. Also, J. Cole’s “4 Your Eyez Only.” That was my first time being credited as a producer working post-production. 

How did you come to meet J. Cole and work on his album?

I met Cole through Earth Gang and J.I.D. They introduced me to him and connected us after he’d heard some stuff I did. He invited me out to the Sheltuh, which is the Dreamville studio house in North Carolina. 

I found out he was going to New York to finish the album, so I bought my own ticket, thinking, “I just gotta be there.” I went with no intention that I was going to be involved. I just wanted to be around and experience the process, but he made sure he kept me in the loop. Sometimes I’d be chillin’ and he’d randomly say something like, “Yo, I think you should go in there and help Elite,” Dreamville’s producer. I didn’t want to impose, so it was good that he reached out and saw a place where I could fit. 

Your debut project, Woo$ah, features a few familiar names. How did collaborations like “I Like You” with DRAM and 6lack come about?

6lack is a good friend, we’ve known each other since before he took off. One day he came back in town and I played him the song. Ended up asking him to get on it, so he did the verse right then and there.

I met DRAM when he was fresh off his “Cha Cha” days. At that point I had a couple songs, but I was kinda trying to figure out if I wanted to be an artist or not. I played “I Like You” for him, and he did a take throughout the whole song. I chopped parts that I liked and placed him in. 

What about your track with two of TDE’s finest? Describe the process of recording “Happy Birthday” with SZA and Isaiah Rashad

I’d already worked on SZA’s album. There’s always good energy with her. I actually didn’t put her on the song though, that was Isaiah's doing. He and I would send stuff back and forth. He liked “Happy Birthday” enough to where he was going to keep it for himself, so that’s why he put her on the song. Then my birthday came, and I was like, “Man, I kinda wanna just drop it,” so I did. 

You moved to Atlanta in 2011. How did working with inner-city acts like Two-9 provide a platform for the success we’ve seen up to this point?

For me, it was probably just as influential as producing “U.O.E.N.O.” with Rocko, Rick Ross, and Future. With that song, I was getting attention high up within the industry, but producing for artists like Two-9 and Rome Fortune gave me like, the base level of notoriety that I needed. 

Do you think Atlanta’s networking scene has had a direct influence on the widespread talent throughout the city? 

Atlanta’s networking scene allows newcomers to dive straight in and meet people who are doing things within the industry already. The Atlanta creatives I met before touching down are the ones who passed on the news about me to others. It definitely played a big part in my career. 

Is there anything we should look forward to in the near future?

More music and more collabs. I can’t say with who yet, but be on the lookout!

Childish Major plays the A3C Hip-Hop festival Oct. 6-7.    Courtesy Humility City/Empire WOO$AHh: the Grammy-nominated artist released his debut solo album in December 2017.                                    Childish Major rising "
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Thursday June 7, 2018 07:00 am EDT
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