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Visual Arts

Visual Arts


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Article

Wednesday June 10, 2020 04:55 pm EDT
a Creative Loafing podcast | more...
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Article

Friday May 1, 2020 06:57 pm EDT
a Creative Loafing podcast | more...
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  string(8874) "It’s an image so ubiquitous in Atlanta that it’s now burned into our collective subconscious landscape. One that’s simple, really, but says so much: A drawing of two hands, clasped in prayer, with the words “Pray for ATL” below them. Originally attributed to R.L. Ministries, it’s the work of Atlanta pop artist R.Land. It’s not the only image for which R.Land is known, but it has certainly had the most impact.

R.Land has been an artist since the late ’80s, but it wasn’t until he moved from Duval County, in northeast Florida, to Atlanta a quarter of a century ago that his work began popping up in the city he now calls home. The inhabitants of his drawings are somewhat disheveled and scraggly — misfits, if you will — yet endearing in an inviting way. The creatures draw you in — and then seem to knock you sideways with a saying or surroundings that make you think twice.

With the advent of the coronavirus, R.Land thought it was time to take action to insure the health and safety of those in this city who’ve embraced his work over the years. With a few changes, “Pray for ATL” became “Wash for ATL,” and the clasped hands took on a new significance in light of the threat of COVID-19.

In a recent exchange of emails — R.Land was one of the first in Atlanta to take up voluntary self-isolation (he also wears his painting respirator when he has to go shopping) — the artist discussed his new work and what has become a new mantra for Atlanta and the United Way.

Tony Paris: You created the “Wash for ATL” design based on “Pray for ATL.” What was the inspiration behind “Pray for ATL?”

R.Land: Originally, “Pray for ATL” was a reaction to what was starting to happen in intown Atlanta in the early part of this century — the unique, soulful vibe of the urban core was under attack … developers were coming in and bringing chain retail businesses (normally found in the suburbs) and building “yuppie ghettos,” those large condos and loft buildings. They were quickly constructed and exploding all over town.

I knew this threatened the very character of the city that I had fallen in love with decades earlier. The call for prayer was just my way of expressing my frustration and dismay over that situation, but once I started posting the image around the streets (of Atlanta) in 2004, it took off pretty fast and meant different things to different people. I love that the design has absolutely transcended its original intent and has become a hometown identifier for lots of folks.

In a United Way press release you state you created “Wash” as a “lighthearted way to remind people” of what to do during this pandemic. A lot of your work, on the surface, seems lighthearted, but many times I sense a deeper meaning to it. Do you find such an approach tends to get a message across better than to knock someone over the head with sloganeering and beliefs?

Yes, because it gives the viewer a chance to think about the issue or subject in an unexpected or challenging way, hopefully. Even a very profound and serious message can be delivered in a seemingly simple and lighthearted package.

Funds raised from the sale of “Wash for ATL” items will provide crucial services to high-risk audiences, yet you were interested in working with United Way even before this project. What is it that draws you to the organization?

They are a tried-and-true, respected organization, and the Atlanta chapter is the largest in the country. They have the reach and ability to get help to those who are in dire need quickly and on a large scale. They’re working with the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta on the Covid-19 Response and Recovery Fund, and they have done, and are doing, a lot of good for our community as well.

How is “Wash for ATL” helping United Way?

The image is continuing to be a good PSA, and it’s raising awareness and money for the fund. But hopefully it’s also reaching new people who may know my work but don’t have a relationship with United Way, and it’s letting them know they can help by making a donation — or they can help by buying a “Wash for ATL” t-shirt or a mug or a magnet. All of it helps. And I hope people feel good while they’re wearing their shirt or drinking coffee in their mug because they know they’re doing good. They’re not just buying something they may like of mine, which is great, of course; they’re actually making a difference. Taking the old “Pray for ATL” design and changing it to “Wash for” and adding suds was a no-brainer in light of what was happening with the pandemic. I’m glad I did it, because I couldn’t have imagined the kind of response it has gotten ... or that United Way would reach out to partner, and it would turn into something that actually offers relief to people being hit hard by this.

There are t-shirts, coffee mugs, and small magnets available. Are there plans for any other items?

Yes! Coming up ... wall art prints, poster prints, and soap dispensers (not really). I do have more phases of the campaign planned. And we’ve been working with Chris Carlock from Bang-On (T-Shirts) in L5P on the t-shirts. There are some new colors coming out soon.

Recently you also created the label for Ria Pell Ale. Was that your idea, or, were you approached by Creature Comforts Brewing Company to create the artwork?

Creature Comforts contacted me back in November of 2019, and we talked extensively about the plan for that product and its launch. A portion of the proceeds of the sale of the beer will go to Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition.

There was a celebration for Ria Pell Ale’s release at Elmyriachi on March 15, yet you weren’t in attendance. That was the first weekend that Atlantans seemed truly concerned about the coronavirus pandemic, even a week before the Mayor signed a stay-at-home order. Where were you?

At home! As you said, it was the first week where folks were beginning to freak out about the virus, and I was just getting over a pretty rough bout of viral bronchitis. So I wasn’t gonna push my luck, as much as I would’ve loved to have been there!

I understand that there were posters made for Ria Pell Ale which were printed but, since you were in quarantine, were not distributed March 15. What are the plans for those posters now?

Those prints were planned for that event but now we’re selling them at rlandart.com, and the proceeds will go to Ria’s Bluebird to financially help the staff (who of course aren’t working while the restaurant is closed), until the crisis subsides and things start to open back up again.

Another one of your designs, “Plazasaur,” is also being used to raise funds for employees of the Plaza Theatre. Was that image originally for fundraising as such — or was it a logo created for the Plaza to do with it as they like?

Yes, I created that design a decade or so ago and donated it to Jonny and Gayle Rej, who were the owners of the Plaza Theatre at that time, so that they could sell the shirts as souvenirs and have a way to make extra money. I really loved that they were keeping the Plaza alive and giving it so much love!  Chris Escobar, the new owner, reached out a couple of weeks ago and asked if we could reboot the design and use it as something they could sell to generate interest in the theater and help offset operation\costs and help employees while they are closed for the duration of the pandemic.

Are any other of your works currently being sold in conjunction with efforts to raise money for those impacted by COVID-19?

I’ve got some things in the works. I’ll let you know when they’re ready to go.

A number of people complain about having to stay at home during the pandemic, yet, in a previous conversation we had, you said people should take advantage of this time in quarantine. What did you mean?

I’m trying to treat it as an opportunity to deep dive into new projects, catch up on old projects, and focus on that stuff, unfettered by the expectations of a normal day. What my normal day was. It’s an opportunity to crack shit wide open in terms of things you’d like to take on or have yet to imagine …  At least for me. A lot of people don’t have that kind of opportunity because they’re working on the front lines and just trying to survive this, so it’s also been important for me to use this time to find a way to help those folks in the way I can.

!!!For more information:
To order "Wash for ATL" t-shirts, go here.
To order other "Wash for ATL" and R.Land items, go here.
For more information on how to donate to The Greater Atlanta Covid19 Response and Recovery Fund, go here. To learn more about the fund, go here.
For information on how you might receive help, go here.


 "
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  string(10074) "It’s an image so ubiquitous in Atlanta that it’s now burned into our collective subconscious landscape. One that’s simple, really, but says so much: A drawing of two hands, clasped in prayer, with the words “Pray for ATL” below them. Originally attributed to R.L. Ministries, it’s the work of Atlanta pop artist R.Land. It’s not the only image for which R.Land is known, but it has certainly had the most impact.

R.Land has been an artist since the late ’80s, but it wasn’t until he moved from Duval County, in northeast Florida, to Atlanta a quarter of a century ago that his work began popping up in the city he now calls home. The inhabitants of his drawings are somewhat disheveled and scraggly — misfits, if you will — yet endearing in an inviting way. The creatures draw you in — and then seem to knock you sideways with a saying or surroundings that make you think twice.

With the advent of the coronavirus, R.Land thought it was time to take action to insure the health and safety of those in this city who’ve embraced his work over the years. With a few changes, “Pray for ATL” became “Wash for ATL,” and the clasped hands took on a new significance in light of the threat of COVID-19.

In a recent exchange of emails — R.Land was one of the first in Atlanta to take up voluntary self-isolation (he also wears his painting respirator when he has to go shopping) — the artist discussed his new work and what has become a new mantra for Atlanta and the United Way.

__Tony Paris: You created the “Wash for ATL” design based on “Pray for ATL.” What was the inspiration behind “Pray for ATL?”__

__R.Land:__ Originally, “Pray for ATL” was a reaction to what was starting to happen in intown Atlanta in the early part of this century — the unique, soulful vibe of the urban core was under attack … developers were coming in and bringing chain retail businesses (normally found in the suburbs) and building “yuppie ghettos,” those large condos and loft buildings. They were quickly constructed and exploding all over town.

I knew this threatened the very character of the city that I had fallen in love with decades earlier. The call for prayer was just my way of expressing my frustration and dismay over that situation, but once I started posting the image around the streets (of Atlanta) in 2004, it took off pretty fast and meant different things to different people. I love that the design has absolutely transcended its original intent and has become a hometown identifier for lots of folks.

__In a United Way press release you state you created “Wash” as a “lighthearted way to remind people” of what to do during this pandemic. A lot of your work, on the surface, seems lighthearted, but many times I sense a deeper meaning to it. Do you find such an approach tends to get a message across better than to knock someone over the head with sloganeering and beliefs?__

Yes, because it gives the viewer a chance to think about the issue or subject in an unexpected or challenging way, hopefully. Even a very profound and serious message can be delivered in a seemingly simple and lighthearted package.

__Funds raised from the sale of “Wash for ATL” items will provide crucial services to high-risk audiences, yet you were interested in working with [https://www.unitedwayatlanta.org|United Way] even before this project. What is it that draws you to the organization?__

They are a tried-and-true, respected organization, and the Atlanta chapter is the largest in the country. They have the reach and ability to get help to those who are in dire need quickly and on a large scale. They’re working with the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta on the Covid-19 Response and Recovery Fund, and they have done, and are doing, a lot of good for our community as well.

__How is “Wash for ATL” helping United Way?__

The image is continuing to be a good PSA, and it’s raising awareness and money for the fund. But hopefully it’s also reaching new people who may know my work but don’t have a relationship with United Way, and it’s letting them know they can help by making a donation — or they can help by buying a “Wash for ATL” t-shirt or a mug or a magnet. All of it helps. And I hope people feel good while they’re wearing their shirt or drinking coffee in their mug because they know they’re doing good. They’re not just buying something they may like of mine, which is great, of course; they’re actually making a difference. Taking the old “Pray for ATL” design and changing it to “Wash for” and adding suds was a no-brainer in light of what was happening with the pandemic. I’m glad I did it, because I couldn’t have imagined the kind of response it has gotten ... or that United Way would reach out to partner, and it would turn into something that actually offers relief to people being hit hard by this.

__There are t-shirts, coffee mugs, and small magnets available. Are there plans for any other items?__

Yes! Coming up ... wall art prints, poster prints, and soap dispensers (not really). I do have more phases of the campaign planned. And we’ve been working with Chris Carlock from Bang-On (T-Shirts) in L5P on the t-shirts. There are some new colors coming out soon.

__Recently you also created the label for [http://www.creaturecomfortsbeer.com/calendar/2020/4/6/brew-for-one-ria-pell-ale-eh2tr|Ria Pell Ale]. Was that your idea, or, were you approached by [http://www.creaturecomfortsbeer.com|Creature Comforts Brewing Company] to create the artwork?__

Creature Comforts contacted me back in November of 2019, and we talked extensively about the plan for that product and its launch. A portion of the proceeds of the sale of the beer will go to [https://atlantaharmreduction.org|Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition].

__There was a celebration for Ria Pell Ale’s release at [https://www.elmyriachi.com|Elmyriachi] on March 15, yet you weren’t in attendance. That was the first weekend that Atlantans seemed truly concerned about the coronavirus pandemic, even a week before the Mayor signed a stay-at-home order. Where were you?__

At home! As you said, it was the first week where folks were beginning to freak out about the virus, and I was just getting over a pretty rough bout of viral bronchitis. So I wasn’t gonna push my luck, as much as I would’ve loved to have been there!

__I understand that there were posters made for Ria Pell Ale which were printed but, since you were in quarantine, were not distributed March 15. What are the plans for those posters now?__

Those prints were planned for that event but now we’re selling them at [https://rland.bigcartel.com/product/limited-edition-creature-comforts-ria-pell-ale-print|rlandart.com], and the proceeds will go to Ria’s Bluebird to financially help the staff (who of course aren’t working while the restaurant is closed), until the crisis subsides and things start to open back up again.

__Another one of your designs, “Plazasaur,” is also being used to raise funds for employees of the [https://plazaatlanta.com|Plaza Theatre]. Was that image originally for fundraising as such — or was it a logo created for the Plaza to do with it as they like?__

Yes, I created that design a decade or so ago and donated it to Jonny and Gayle Rej, who were the owners of the Plaza Theatre at that time, so that they could sell the shirts as souvenirs and have a way to make extra money. I really loved that they were keeping the Plaza alive and giving it so much love!  Chris Escobar, the new owner, reached out a couple of weeks ago and asked if we could reboot the design and use it as something they could sell to generate interest in the theater and help offset operation\costs and help employees while they are closed for the duration of the pandemic.

__Are any other of your works currently being sold in conjunction with efforts to raise money for those impacted by COVID-19?__

I’ve got some things in the works. I’ll let you know when they’re ready to go.

__A number of people complain about having to stay at home during the pandemic, yet, in a previous conversation we had, you said people should take advantage of this time in quarantine. What did you mean?__

I’m trying to treat it as an opportunity to deep dive into new projects, catch up on old projects, and focus on that stuff, unfettered by the expectations of a normal day. What my normal day was. It’s an opportunity to crack shit wide open in terms of things you’d like to take on or have yet to imagine …  At least for me. A lot of people don’t have that kind of opportunity because they’re working on the front lines and just trying to survive this, so it’s also been important for me to use this time to find a way to help those folks in the way I can.

!!!__For more information:__
To order "Wash for ATL" t-shirts, [https://washforatl.square.site|go here.]
To order other "Wash for ATL" and R.Land items, [https://www.rlandart.com|go here].
For more information on how to donate to The Greater Atlanta Covid19 Response and Recovery Fund, [https://secure.givelively.org/donate/united-way-of-greater-atlanta-inc/covid-19-relief-fund|go here]. To learn more about the fund, [http://cfgreateratlanta.org/nonprofits/available-grants/covid-19-response-recovery-fund/|go here].
For information on how you might receive help, [https://www.unitedwayatlanta.org/need-help/|go here].

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  string(9735) " Atlanta Artist R.Land R.Land 2 Studio JAMES CRICHLOW Jacksonville Business Journal 2020-04-10T18:28:23+00:00 R.Land_2_studio_JAMES_CRICHLOW_Jacksonville_Business_Journal.jpg    rland washatl United Way and other organizations to benefit from his artwork 30513  2020-04-01T04:00:00+00:00 ATL pop artist R.Land takes action: ‘prayers’ aren’t enough jim.harris@creativeloafing.com Jim Harris TONY PARIS Tony Paris 2020-04-01T04:00:00+00:00  It’s an image so ubiquitous in Atlanta that it’s now burned into our collective subconscious landscape. One that’s simple, really, but says so much: A drawing of two hands, clasped in prayer, with the words “Pray for ATL” below them. Originally attributed to R.L. Ministries, it’s the work of Atlanta pop artist R.Land. It’s not the only image for which R.Land is known, but it has certainly had the most impact.

R.Land has been an artist since the late ’80s, but it wasn’t until he moved from Duval County, in northeast Florida, to Atlanta a quarter of a century ago that his work began popping up in the city he now calls home. The inhabitants of his drawings are somewhat disheveled and scraggly — misfits, if you will — yet endearing in an inviting way. The creatures draw you in — and then seem to knock you sideways with a saying or surroundings that make you think twice.

With the advent of the coronavirus, R.Land thought it was time to take action to insure the health and safety of those in this city who’ve embraced his work over the years. With a few changes, “Pray for ATL” became “Wash for ATL,” and the clasped hands took on a new significance in light of the threat of COVID-19.

In a recent exchange of emails — R.Land was one of the first in Atlanta to take up voluntary self-isolation (he also wears his painting respirator when he has to go shopping) — the artist discussed his new work and what has become a new mantra for Atlanta and the United Way.

Tony Paris: You created the “Wash for ATL” design based on “Pray for ATL.” What was the inspiration behind “Pray for ATL?”

R.Land: Originally, “Pray for ATL” was a reaction to what was starting to happen in intown Atlanta in the early part of this century — the unique, soulful vibe of the urban core was under attack … developers were coming in and bringing chain retail businesses (normally found in the suburbs) and building “yuppie ghettos,” those large condos and loft buildings. They were quickly constructed and exploding all over town.

I knew this threatened the very character of the city that I had fallen in love with decades earlier. The call for prayer was just my way of expressing my frustration and dismay over that situation, but once I started posting the image around the streets (of Atlanta) in 2004, it took off pretty fast and meant different things to different people. I love that the design has absolutely transcended its original intent and has become a hometown identifier for lots of folks.

In a United Way press release you state you created “Wash” as a “lighthearted way to remind people” of what to do during this pandemic. A lot of your work, on the surface, seems lighthearted, but many times I sense a deeper meaning to it. Do you find such an approach tends to get a message across better than to knock someone over the head with sloganeering and beliefs?

Yes, because it gives the viewer a chance to think about the issue or subject in an unexpected or challenging way, hopefully. Even a very profound and serious message can be delivered in a seemingly simple and lighthearted package.

Funds raised from the sale of “Wash for ATL” items will provide crucial services to high-risk audiences, yet you were interested in working with United Way even before this project. What is it that draws you to the organization?

They are a tried-and-true, respected organization, and the Atlanta chapter is the largest in the country. They have the reach and ability to get help to those who are in dire need quickly and on a large scale. They’re working with the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta on the Covid-19 Response and Recovery Fund, and they have done, and are doing, a lot of good for our community as well.

How is “Wash for ATL” helping United Way?

The image is continuing to be a good PSA, and it’s raising awareness and money for the fund. But hopefully it’s also reaching new people who may know my work but don’t have a relationship with United Way, and it’s letting them know they can help by making a donation — or they can help by buying a “Wash for ATL” t-shirt or a mug or a magnet. All of it helps. And I hope people feel good while they’re wearing their shirt or drinking coffee in their mug because they know they’re doing good. They’re not just buying something they may like of mine, which is great, of course; they’re actually making a difference. Taking the old “Pray for ATL” design and changing it to “Wash for” and adding suds was a no-brainer in light of what was happening with the pandemic. I’m glad I did it, because I couldn’t have imagined the kind of response it has gotten ... or that United Way would reach out to partner, and it would turn into something that actually offers relief to people being hit hard by this.

There are t-shirts, coffee mugs, and small magnets available. Are there plans for any other items?

Yes! Coming up ... wall art prints, poster prints, and soap dispensers (not really). I do have more phases of the campaign planned. And we’ve been working with Chris Carlock from Bang-On (T-Shirts) in L5P on the t-shirts. There are some new colors coming out soon.

Recently you also created the label for Ria Pell Ale. Was that your idea, or, were you approached by Creature Comforts Brewing Company to create the artwork?

Creature Comforts contacted me back in November of 2019, and we talked extensively about the plan for that product and its launch. A portion of the proceeds of the sale of the beer will go to Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition.

There was a celebration for Ria Pell Ale’s release at Elmyriachi on March 15, yet you weren’t in attendance. That was the first weekend that Atlantans seemed truly concerned about the coronavirus pandemic, even a week before the Mayor signed a stay-at-home order. Where were you?

At home! As you said, it was the first week where folks were beginning to freak out about the virus, and I was just getting over a pretty rough bout of viral bronchitis. So I wasn’t gonna push my luck, as much as I would’ve loved to have been there!

I understand that there were posters made for Ria Pell Ale which were printed but, since you were in quarantine, were not distributed March 15. What are the plans for those posters now?

Those prints were planned for that event but now we’re selling them at rlandart.com, and the proceeds will go to Ria’s Bluebird to financially help the staff (who of course aren’t working while the restaurant is closed), until the crisis subsides and things start to open back up again.

Another one of your designs, “Plazasaur,” is also being used to raise funds for employees of the Plaza Theatre. Was that image originally for fundraising as such — or was it a logo created for the Plaza to do with it as they like?

Yes, I created that design a decade or so ago and donated it to Jonny and Gayle Rej, who were the owners of the Plaza Theatre at that time, so that they could sell the shirts as souvenirs and have a way to make extra money. I really loved that they were keeping the Plaza alive and giving it so much love!  Chris Escobar, the new owner, reached out a couple of weeks ago and asked if we could reboot the design and use it as something they could sell to generate interest in the theater and help offset operation\costs and help employees while they are closed for the duration of the pandemic.

Are any other of your works currently being sold in conjunction with efforts to raise money for those impacted by COVID-19?

I’ve got some things in the works. I’ll let you know when they’re ready to go.

A number of people complain about having to stay at home during the pandemic, yet, in a previous conversation we had, you said people should take advantage of this time in quarantine. What did you mean?

I’m trying to treat it as an opportunity to deep dive into new projects, catch up on old projects, and focus on that stuff, unfettered by the expectations of a normal day. What my normal day was. It’s an opportunity to crack shit wide open in terms of things you’d like to take on or have yet to imagine …  At least for me. A lot of people don’t have that kind of opportunity because they’re working on the front lines and just trying to survive this, so it’s also been important for me to use this time to find a way to help those folks in the way I can.

!!!For more information:
To order "Wash for ATL" t-shirts, go here.
To order other "Wash for ATL" and R.Land items, go here.
For more information on how to donate to The Greater Atlanta Covid19 Response and Recovery Fund, go here. To learn more about the fund, go here.
For information on how you might receive help, go here.


     james crichlow/jacksonville business journal AT HOME HE’S A TOURIST: R.Land where he spends most of his time, at his downtown studio.  0,0,10 chris.carlock@creativeloafing.com (itemId:470511 trackerid:9), United Way of Greater Atlanta (itemId:470510 trackerid:1), Elmyriachi (itemId:486 trackerid:1)   rland washATL                             ATL pop artist R.Land takes action: ‘prayers’ aren’t enough "
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Monday February 10, 2020 03:52 pm EST
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  string(613) " Tripp By Aaron Coury  2020-01-21T15:57:36+00:00 tripp by aaron coury.jpg     A Creative Loafing Podcast 27776  2020-01-21T15:50:30+00:00 CULTURE CLASH: Photographer Tripp Cook will.cardwell@gmail.com Will Cardwell Jill Melancon  2020-01-21T15:50:30+00:00  

Host Jill Melancon talks to photographer Tripp Cook about the dangers of urban exploration photography and how he gets local musicians and artists to feel comfortable having their picture taken.    Aaron Coury URBAN EXPLORATION PHOTOGRAPHY: A conversation with Tripp Cook.  0,0,10                                 CULTURE CLASH: Photographer Tripp Cook "
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Tuesday January 21, 2020 10:50 am EST
A Creative Loafing Podcast | more...
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  string(9564) "The Move is a column intended to help you beat the fight against basic, one move at a time. Look here for all the best underground, and some above ground, events in ATL. Bc you CAN have a balanced diet of disco and yoga. Warning of side effects: Overdose of culture and queerdom. Bloated bank account from lack of overpriced ticket purchase. Confusion meeting clarity via mind, body and soul. Consume at your own risk.

Shameless copy/paste plug OTMonth: Psst… Xtra! Xtra! Weed all about it! Shameless plug for the latest episode of, “Friends in High Places.” Listen along as I interview the likes of those mapping out the cannabis industry for Georgians, bc it’s not coming, it’s here. For more updates: @CallMeMissConception @CreativeLoafingAtlanta

!!!SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2
”Girls That Go Bump in the Night,” Naked Girls Reading — I’m attracted to nudity, love a good topless beach, and wish, almost daily, that I could ride my bike topless with zero fux given by anyone in sight. I’m that person who replaces female nipples on the internet with those of a man to prove a nipple is just a nipple. Naturally, when I see an event with the word “naked,” I’m intrigued. No, I am not a pervert, I just don’t like being told what to do with my body, period!

“Naked Girls Reading” first started in Chicago “in March of 2009 as an idea of two international showgirls, Michelle L’amour and Franky Vivid. It is a group of beautiful ladies who love to read … naked. That’s really it. There’s not a whole lot more to it.” I have so many questions, but I guess I’ll just have to attend to find out. BTW, this Atlanta show celebrates All Souls Day with ghost and horror stories. $20. 8:30 p.m. (doors). Metropolitan Studios, 1259 Metropolitan Ave. S.E. 404-219-2003. 

!!!THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7–SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10
Josephine, a burlesque cabaret dream play — Fringe Fest Atlanta is in its sixth year with 543 curtain calls and counting. This year’s standout performance is one that has already sold out shows across the U.S. Josephine portrays the celebrity life of Josephine Baker, an American ex-pat who moved to France in the 1920s and found success in film as a black woman. “(Baker) starred alongside white romantic leading men in films in the ’30s, had multiple interracial marriages and homosexual relationships, and performed in men’s clothing before the term ‘drag’ existed in the lexicon.”

On playing the lead role, performer Tymisha Harris says, "I believe the time is long overdue for strong women of color to have their voices heard and their stories told. Playing Josephine Baker for the last three years has made me a better performer and human. To be able to share this story that touches hearts and minds across the world has been the most fulfilling artistic endeavor of my life."

Atlanta Fringe Festival takes place over several days in venues across the city. You have four opportunities to catch “a burlesque cabaret dream play” at the Southwest Arts Center. Though it was established in 2001, I’m just learning of the Center now myself. It was the first Fulton County spot created for the sole purpose of inspiring and housing the arts. It is also MARTA-friendly. Take the train to the West End and hop a short bus. Have you been on a MARTA bus lately? They are clean, virtually empty, and it’s legal to text and ride. $25. 8 p.m. Nov. 7-9. 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 10. Southwest Arts Center, 915 New Hope Road S.W. 404-613-3220. 

!!!SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9
Condom Couture — When it comes to philanthropic creativity, this event fits like a condom. Yes, you read it right and no, it’s not a dirty word. Condom Couture Atlanta is shredding sexual taboos, raising money for Planned Parenthood, and supporting local artists with their upcoming fashion runway show at the Westside Cultural Center.

“We're doing this to raise awareness and funds for reproductive health care services, advocacy, and education in Georgia. For men, women, and families; all inclusive of cultures, genders and identities.” — Condom Couture Atlanta.

Local designers will create fashion lewks from condoms. They prefer to work with non-lubed condoms for garments, I’m told. $50-$300. 8 p.m.-10 p.m. Westside Cultural Arts Center, 760 10th St. 404-594-6412.

The Original Mannequin Project 2019 — Four years ago, Atlantan Grayton Pinkston was born — and quickly diagnosed with cystic fibrosis. Almost immediately, a group of his family and friends formed Grayton’s Guardians to raise money for cystic fibrosis research. To date, they have participated in numerous walks and adventures around the country in Grayton’s name. Just last month, members of Grayton’s Guardians hiked from the south ridge of the Grand Canyon to the north ridge to raise awareness and funding for cystic fibrosis research.

The upcoming Atlanta event, however, is a little different. Thrown in true Melrose & McQueen fashion, this is a party. There will be free beer, prizes, and antics at the Basement in EAV for the eighth year of The Mannequin Project, Melrose & McQueen’s annual charitable event. Each year, a different cause is chosen. I asked Grayton’s uncle, Mike Dean, about the connection between Grayton’s Guardians and the hair salon, and it’s quite a charming story.

“Our family’s story with Melrose and McQueen started seven years ago at Inman Park Fest. I dropped by because they were having a party, and the next thing I knew, I was getting my hair cut there each month. Sometimes I even dropped in with my dog, Buckley, who the staff adored. Slowly, each family member started going to Melrose. My wife Natalie, my sister, my brother in law, my mom, and my dad. Kristo and his team have always felt like an extended family. Once Grayton needed his first haircut he naturally was going to go where the rest of the family goes. Grayton's now goes to Melrose for his haircuts. Kristo, Amber, Laura, Kenny, and team usually stop by to say hey, and they talk about Grayton’s favorite subject: monster trucks. Next time you drop by the shop, take a look behind the bar and you’ll see pictures of Grayton and Buckley back there.

“We’re honored to have Grayton’s Guardians partner up with the Mannequin Project,” Dean continues, “because it’s different than other charity events. We love that it supports one of our favorite local businesses along with local artists in the community. We hope to see you there.” $10. 6 p.m.-10 p.m. 21+. The Basement, 1245 Glenwood Ave. S.E. 404-622-8686.

!!!WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13
Mommie Dearest at The Plaza Theatre — This month’s installment of Wussy programming at the Plaza Theatre is the usual camp cult genre, with Faye Dunaway starring in Mommie Dearest. According to her fellow cast members, Dunaway was more difficult and terrifying than the role of Joan Crawford she was playing. I can’t imagine anyone over the age of 30 who hasn’t seen this film, but you’ll want to clear your closet of wire hangers before you return home. $15. 7 p.m.-10 p.m. The Plaza Theater, 1049 Ponce De Leon Ave. N.E. 470-225-6503.

!!!FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15
Wahine’s Hideaway Vol. 1 — DJ Wahine is back, Atlanta, and establishing a new TROPICAL party, inside for the winter. This kitschy, tiki-themed party pops up at Edgewood SPKEZ (that’s Speakeasy for those who need more vowels) and encourages tropical lewks. Expect to hear warm sounds of funk and tropical disco.

Wahine on why she decided to rejoin the DJ scene, “I’ve been spinning since ’04 but took a long hiatus and didn’t come back to it until earlier this year. ATL’s very welcoming scene has been a big part of that return.” $10. 10 p.m.-3 a.m. Edgewood SPKEZ, 327A Edgewood Ave. S.E. 404-343-4404. 

!!!SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23
Kinetic Light: “Descent” — The Georgia Tech Arts department has a new director, Dr. Aaron Shackelford. We met at the Ferst Center last month while an aerialist performed high above us on campus during a light and audio mash-up. Wearing a chic scarf and blazer in 90 percent humidity, Shackelford looks the part of a new art director, committing to the scarf despite the heat. His excitement to be in this new role is obvious — and infectious.

The performance I’m most looking forward to this month is by Kinetic Light, a team of dancers in wheelchairs who appear to defy gravity. Kinetic Light has traveled the globe performing “on an architectural ramp with hills, curves, and peaks” in shows that “celebrate the pleasure of reckless abandon.” $15-$25. 8 p.m.-10 p.m. Ferst Center for the Arts, Georgia Tech, 349 Ferst Drive N.W. 404-894-9600.

Nonsense ATL presents Atlanta Disco Society + special guest Ree de la Vega — It tiz zee season to hold up in a dark room and dance with strangers. It’s the only way to exist in cold temps, IMO. OK, obviously I like to do a lot of other activities in cold temps, but dressing in a disco lewk is def high on the list.

“Four times a year, Atlanta Disco Society celebrates the glamour, debauchery, and decadence of the Studio 54 era. With red carpets, a light-up dance floor, next-level fashion and lewks, and disco music from the 1970s through today, ADS is always a night to remember. For the November edition, we’re especially excited to have Ree de la Vega as our special guest, playing along with DJ Kimber.” — Nonsense ATL. $10. 10 p.m.-3 a.m. The Basement, 1245 Glenwood Ave. S.E. 404-622-8686. "
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  string(10620) "The Move is a column intended to help you beat the fight against basic, one move at a time. Look here for all the best underground, and some above ground, events in ATL. Bc you CAN have a balanced diet of disco and yoga. Warning of side effects: Overdose of culture and queerdom. Bloated bank account from lack of overpriced ticket purchase. Confusion meeting clarity via mind, body and soul. Consume at your own risk.

Shameless copy/paste plug OTMonth: Psst… Xtra! Xtra! Weed all about it! Shameless plug for the latest episode of, “Friends in High Places.” Listen along as I interview the likes of those mapping out the cannabis industry for Georgians, bc it’s not coming, it’s here. For more updates: @CallMeMissConception @CreativeLoafingAtlanta

!!!__SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2__
__”Girls That Go Bump in the Night,” Naked Girls Reading__ — I’m attracted to nudity, love a good topless beach, and wish, almost daily, that I could ride my bike topless with zero fux given by anyone in sight. I’m that person who replaces female nipples on the internet with those of a man to prove a nipple is just a nipple. Naturally, when I see an event with the word “naked,” I’m intrigued. No, I am not a pervert, I just don’t like being told what to do with my body, period!

“[https://nakedgirlsreading.com|Naked Girls Reading]” first started in Chicago “in March of 2009 as an idea of two international showgirls, Michelle L’amour and Franky Vivid. It is a group of beautiful ladies who love to read … naked. That’s really it. There’s not a whole lot more to it.” I have so many questions, but I guess I’ll just have to attend to find out. BTW, this [https://www.facebook.com/NGRATL/|Atlanta show] celebrates All Souls Day with ghost and horror stories. ''$20. 8:30 p.m. (doors). Metropolitan Studios, 1259 Metropolitan Ave. S.E. 404-219-2003. ''

!!!__THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7–SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10__
__Josephine, a burlesque cabaret dream play__ — Fringe Fest Atlanta is in its sixth year with 543 curtain calls and counting. This year’s standout performance is one that has already sold out shows across the U.S. ''[https://josephinetheplay.com|Josephine]'' portrays the celebrity life of Josephine Baker, an American ex-pat who moved to France in the 1920s and found success in film as a black woman. “(Baker) starred alongside white romantic leading men in films in the ’30s, had multiple interracial marriages and homosexual relationships, and performed in men’s clothing before the term ‘drag’ existed in the lexicon.”

On playing the lead role, performer Tymisha Harris says, "I believe the time is long overdue for strong women of color to have their voices heard and their stories told. Playing Josephine Baker for the last three years has made me a better performer and human. To be able to share this story that touches hearts and minds across the world has been the most fulfilling artistic endeavor of my life."

[https://atlantafringe.org/2019-festival/|Atlanta Fringe Festival] takes place over several days in venues across the city. You have four opportunities to catch “a burlesque cabaret dream play” at the Southwest Arts Center. Though it was established in 2001, I’m just learning of the Center now myself. It was the first Fulton County spot created for the sole purpose of inspiring and housing the arts. It is also MARTA-friendly. Take the train to the West End and hop a short bus. Have you been on a MARTA bus lately? They are clean, virtually empty, and it’s legal to text and ride. ''$25. 8 p.m. Nov. 7-9. 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 10. [http://fultonarts.org/index.php/art-centers/southwest-arts-center|Southwest Arts Center], 915 New Hope Road S.W. 404-613-3220. ''

!!!__SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9__
__Condom Couture__ — When it comes to philanthropic creativity, this event fits like a condom. Yes, you read it right and no, it’s not a dirty word. [https://www.condomcoutureatl.com|Condom Couture Atlanta] is shredding sexual taboos, raising money for Planned Parenthood, and supporting local artists with their upcoming fashion runway show at the Westside Cultural Center.

“We're doing this to raise awareness and funds for reproductive health care services, advocacy, and education in Georgia. For men, women, and families; all inclusive of cultures, genders and identities.” — Condom Couture Atlanta.

Local designers will create fashion lewks from condoms. They prefer to work with non-lubed condoms for garments, I’m told. ''$50-$300. 8 p.m.-10 p.m. [https://www.westsideartscenter.com|Westside Cultural Arts Center], 760 10th St. 404-594-6412.''

__[https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-original-mannequin-project-2019-tickets-75234062105|The Original Mannequin Project 2019]__ — Four years ago, Atlantan Grayton Pinkston was born — and quickly diagnosed with cystic fibrosis. Almost immediately, a group of his family and friends formed Grayton’s Guardians to raise money for cystic fibrosis research. To date, they have participated in numerous walks and adventures around the country in Grayton’s name. Just last month, members of [http://fightcf.cff.org/site/TR?company_id=3271&pg=national_company|Grayton’s Guardians] hiked from the south ridge of the Grand Canyon to the north ridge to raise awareness and funding for cystic fibrosis research.

The upcoming Atlanta event, however, is a little different. Thrown in true Melrose & McQueen fashion, this is a party. There will be free beer, prizes, and antics at the Basement in EAV for the eighth year of The Mannequin Project, [http://www.melroseandmcqueen.com|Melrose & McQueen]’s annual charitable event. Each year, a different cause is chosen. I asked Grayton’s uncle, Mike Dean, about the connection between Grayton’s Guardians and the hair salon, and it’s quite a charming story.

“Our family’s story with Melrose and McQueen started seven years ago at Inman Park Fest. I dropped by because they were having a party, and the next thing I knew, I was getting my hair cut there each month. Sometimes I even dropped in with my dog, Buckley, who the staff adored. Slowly, each family member started going to Melrose. My wife Natalie, my sister, my brother in law, my mom, and my dad. Kristo and his team have always felt like an extended family. Once Grayton needed his first haircut he naturally was going to go where the rest of the family goes. Grayton's now goes to Melrose for his haircuts. Kristo, Amber, Laura, Kenny, and team usually stop by to say hey, and they talk about Grayton’s favorite subject: monster trucks. Next time you drop by the shop, take a look behind the bar and you’ll see pictures of Grayton and Buckley back there.

“We’re honored to have Grayton’s Guardians partner up with the Mannequin Project,” Dean continues, “because it’s different than other charity events. We love that it supports one of our favorite local businesses along with local artists in the community. We hope to see you there.” ''$10. 6 p.m.-10 p.m. 21+. The [https://basementatl.com|Basement, 1245 Glenwood Ave. S.E.] 404-622-8686.''

!!!__WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13__
__Mommie Dearest at [https://plazaatlanta.com|The Plaza Theatre]__ — This month’s installment of Wussy programming at the Plaza Theatre is the usual camp cult genre, with Faye Dunaway starring in ''Mommie Dearest''. According to her fellow cast members, Dunaway was more difficult and terrifying than the role of Joan Crawford she was playing. I can’t imagine anyone over the age of 30 who hasn’t seen this film, but you’ll want to clear your closet of wire hangers before you return home. ''$15. 7 p.m.-10 p.m. The Plaza Theater, 1049 Ponce De Leon Ave. N.E. 470-225-6503.''

!!!__FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15__
__[https://www.facebook.com/events/503963173516707/|Wahine’s Hideaway Vol. 1]__ — DJ Wahine is back, Atlanta, and establishing a new TROPICAL party, inside for the winter. This kitschy, tiki-themed party pops up at Edgewood SPKEZ (that’s Speakeasy for those who need more vowels) and encourages tropical lewks. Expect to hear warm sounds of funk and tropical disco.

Wahine on why she decided to rejoin the DJ scene, “I’ve been spinning since ’04 but took a long hiatus and didn’t come back to it until earlier this year. ATL’s very welcoming scene has been a big part of that return.” ''$10. 10 p.m.-3 a.m. [https://creativeloafing.com/business-572-edgewood-speakeasy|Edgewood SPKEZ], 327A Edgewood Ave. S.E. 404-343-4404. ''

!!!__SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23__
[https://arts.gatech.edu/content/kinetic-light-descent|__Kinetic Light: “Descent”__] — The Georgia Tech Arts department has a new director, Dr. Aaron Shackelford. We met at the Ferst Center last month while an aerialist performed high above us on campus during a light and audio mash-up. Wearing a chic scarf and blazer in 90 percent humidity, Shackelford looks the part of a new art director, committing to the scarf despite the heat. His excitement to be in this new role is obvious — and infectious.

The performance I’m most looking forward to this month is by [https://kineticlight.org|Kinetic Light,] a team of dancers in wheelchairs who appear to defy gravity. Kinetic Light has traveled the globe performing “on an architectural ramp with hills, curves, and peaks” in shows that “celebrate the pleasure of reckless abandon.” ''$15-$25. 8 p.m.-10 p.m. [https://arts.gatech.edu/content/kinetic-light-descent|Ferst Center for the Arts], Georgia Tech, 349 Ferst Drive N.W. 404-894-9600.''

__[https://www.nonsenseatl.com|Nonsense ATL] presents [https://www.facebook.com/events/2601241503252441/|Atlanta Disco Society] + special guest Ree de la Vega__ — It tiz zee season to hold up in a dark room and dance with strangers. It’s the only way to exist in cold temps, IMO. OK, obviously I like to do a lot of other activities in cold temps, but dressing in a disco lewk is def high on the list.

“Four times a year, Atlanta Disco Society celebrates the glamour, debauchery, and decadence of the Studio 54 era. With red carpets, a light-up dance floor, next-level fashion and lewks, and disco music from the 1970s through today, ADS is always a night to remember. For the November edition, we’re especially excited to have [https://soundcloud.com/ree-de-la-vega|Ree de la Vega] as our special guest, playing along with [https://soundcloud.com/kimberatl|DJ Kimber].” — Nonsense ATL. ''$10. 10 p.m.-3 a.m. [https://basementatl.com|The Basement], 1245 Glenwood Ave. S.E. 404-622-8686. ''"
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  string(10170) " DESCENT KineticLight Photo Jay Newman HIGH RES  2019-11-02T14:10:41+00:00 DESCENT_KineticLight_Photo_Jay_Newman HIGH RES.jpg    themove Hey, y’all! What’s the move? 25625  2019-11-02T13:54:16+00:00 THE MOVE: Plan Accordingly. tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Ema Carr Ema Carr 2019-11-02T13:54:16+00:00  The Move is a column intended to help you beat the fight against basic, one move at a time. Look here for all the best underground, and some above ground, events in ATL. Bc you CAN have a balanced diet of disco and yoga. Warning of side effects: Overdose of culture and queerdom. Bloated bank account from lack of overpriced ticket purchase. Confusion meeting clarity via mind, body and soul. Consume at your own risk.

Shameless copy/paste plug OTMonth: Psst… Xtra! Xtra! Weed all about it! Shameless plug for the latest episode of, “Friends in High Places.” Listen along as I interview the likes of those mapping out the cannabis industry for Georgians, bc it’s not coming, it’s here. For more updates: @CallMeMissConception @CreativeLoafingAtlanta

!!!SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2
”Girls That Go Bump in the Night,” Naked Girls Reading — I’m attracted to nudity, love a good topless beach, and wish, almost daily, that I could ride my bike topless with zero fux given by anyone in sight. I’m that person who replaces female nipples on the internet with those of a man to prove a nipple is just a nipple. Naturally, when I see an event with the word “naked,” I’m intrigued. No, I am not a pervert, I just don’t like being told what to do with my body, period!

“Naked Girls Reading” first started in Chicago “in March of 2009 as an idea of two international showgirls, Michelle L’amour and Franky Vivid. It is a group of beautiful ladies who love to read … naked. That’s really it. There’s not a whole lot more to it.” I have so many questions, but I guess I’ll just have to attend to find out. BTW, this Atlanta show celebrates All Souls Day with ghost and horror stories. $20. 8:30 p.m. (doors). Metropolitan Studios, 1259 Metropolitan Ave. S.E. 404-219-2003. 

!!!THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7–SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10
Josephine, a burlesque cabaret dream play — Fringe Fest Atlanta is in its sixth year with 543 curtain calls and counting. This year’s standout performance is one that has already sold out shows across the U.S. Josephine portrays the celebrity life of Josephine Baker, an American ex-pat who moved to France in the 1920s and found success in film as a black woman. “(Baker) starred alongside white romantic leading men in films in the ’30s, had multiple interracial marriages and homosexual relationships, and performed in men’s clothing before the term ‘drag’ existed in the lexicon.”

On playing the lead role, performer Tymisha Harris says, "I believe the time is long overdue for strong women of color to have their voices heard and their stories told. Playing Josephine Baker for the last three years has made me a better performer and human. To be able to share this story that touches hearts and minds across the world has been the most fulfilling artistic endeavor of my life."

Atlanta Fringe Festival takes place over several days in venues across the city. You have four opportunities to catch “a burlesque cabaret dream play” at the Southwest Arts Center. Though it was established in 2001, I’m just learning of the Center now myself. It was the first Fulton County spot created for the sole purpose of inspiring and housing the arts. It is also MARTA-friendly. Take the train to the West End and hop a short bus. Have you been on a MARTA bus lately? They are clean, virtually empty, and it’s legal to text and ride. $25. 8 p.m. Nov. 7-9. 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 10. Southwest Arts Center, 915 New Hope Road S.W. 404-613-3220. 

!!!SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9
Condom Couture — When it comes to philanthropic creativity, this event fits like a condom. Yes, you read it right and no, it’s not a dirty word. Condom Couture Atlanta is shredding sexual taboos, raising money for Planned Parenthood, and supporting local artists with their upcoming fashion runway show at the Westside Cultural Center.

“We're doing this to raise awareness and funds for reproductive health care services, advocacy, and education in Georgia. For men, women, and families; all inclusive of cultures, genders and identities.” — Condom Couture Atlanta.

Local designers will create fashion lewks from condoms. They prefer to work with non-lubed condoms for garments, I’m told. $50-$300. 8 p.m.-10 p.m. Westside Cultural Arts Center, 760 10th St. 404-594-6412.

The Original Mannequin Project 2019 — Four years ago, Atlantan Grayton Pinkston was born — and quickly diagnosed with cystic fibrosis. Almost immediately, a group of his family and friends formed Grayton’s Guardians to raise money for cystic fibrosis research. To date, they have participated in numerous walks and adventures around the country in Grayton’s name. Just last month, members of Grayton’s Guardians hiked from the south ridge of the Grand Canyon to the north ridge to raise awareness and funding for cystic fibrosis research.

The upcoming Atlanta event, however, is a little different. Thrown in true Melrose & McQueen fashion, this is a party. There will be free beer, prizes, and antics at the Basement in EAV for the eighth year of The Mannequin Project, Melrose & McQueen’s annual charitable event. Each year, a different cause is chosen. I asked Grayton’s uncle, Mike Dean, about the connection between Grayton’s Guardians and the hair salon, and it’s quite a charming story.

“Our family’s story with Melrose and McQueen started seven years ago at Inman Park Fest. I dropped by because they were having a party, and the next thing I knew, I was getting my hair cut there each month. Sometimes I even dropped in with my dog, Buckley, who the staff adored. Slowly, each family member started going to Melrose. My wife Natalie, my sister, my brother in law, my mom, and my dad. Kristo and his team have always felt like an extended family. Once Grayton needed his first haircut he naturally was going to go where the rest of the family goes. Grayton's now goes to Melrose for his haircuts. Kristo, Amber, Laura, Kenny, and team usually stop by to say hey, and they talk about Grayton’s favorite subject: monster trucks. Next time you drop by the shop, take a look behind the bar and you’ll see pictures of Grayton and Buckley back there.

“We’re honored to have Grayton’s Guardians partner up with the Mannequin Project,” Dean continues, “because it’s different than other charity events. We love that it supports one of our favorite local businesses along with local artists in the community. We hope to see you there.” $10. 6 p.m.-10 p.m. 21+. The Basement, 1245 Glenwood Ave. S.E. 404-622-8686.

!!!WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13
Mommie Dearest at The Plaza Theatre — This month’s installment of Wussy programming at the Plaza Theatre is the usual camp cult genre, with Faye Dunaway starring in Mommie Dearest. According to her fellow cast members, Dunaway was more difficult and terrifying than the role of Joan Crawford she was playing. I can’t imagine anyone over the age of 30 who hasn’t seen this film, but you’ll want to clear your closet of wire hangers before you return home. $15. 7 p.m.-10 p.m. The Plaza Theater, 1049 Ponce De Leon Ave. N.E. 470-225-6503.

!!!FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15
Wahine’s Hideaway Vol. 1 — DJ Wahine is back, Atlanta, and establishing a new TROPICAL party, inside for the winter. This kitschy, tiki-themed party pops up at Edgewood SPKEZ (that’s Speakeasy for those who need more vowels) and encourages tropical lewks. Expect to hear warm sounds of funk and tropical disco.

Wahine on why she decided to rejoin the DJ scene, “I’ve been spinning since ’04 but took a long hiatus and didn’t come back to it until earlier this year. ATL’s very welcoming scene has been a big part of that return.” $10. 10 p.m.-3 a.m. Edgewood SPKEZ, 327A Edgewood Ave. S.E. 404-343-4404. 

!!!SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23
Kinetic Light: “Descent” — The Georgia Tech Arts department has a new director, Dr. Aaron Shackelford. We met at the Ferst Center last month while an aerialist performed high above us on campus during a light and audio mash-up. Wearing a chic scarf and blazer in 90 percent humidity, Shackelford looks the part of a new art director, committing to the scarf despite the heat. His excitement to be in this new role is obvious — and infectious.

The performance I’m most looking forward to this month is by Kinetic Light, a team of dancers in wheelchairs who appear to defy gravity. Kinetic Light has traveled the globe performing “on an architectural ramp with hills, curves, and peaks” in shows that “celebrate the pleasure of reckless abandon.” $15-$25. 8 p.m.-10 p.m. Ferst Center for the Arts, Georgia Tech, 349 Ferst Drive N.W. 404-894-9600.

Nonsense ATL presents Atlanta Disco Society + special guest Ree de la Vega — It tiz zee season to hold up in a dark room and dance with strangers. It’s the only way to exist in cold temps, IMO. OK, obviously I like to do a lot of other activities in cold temps, but dressing in a disco lewk is def high on the list.

“Four times a year, Atlanta Disco Society celebrates the glamour, debauchery, and decadence of the Studio 54 era. With red carpets, a light-up dance floor, next-level fashion and lewks, and disco music from the 1970s through today, ADS is always a night to remember. For the November edition, we’re especially excited to have Ree de la Vega as our special guest, playing along with DJ Kimber.” — Nonsense ATL. $10. 10 p.m.-3 a.m. The Basement, 1245 Glenwood Ave. S.E. 404-622-8686.     JAY NEWMAN MAKING EYE CONTACT AND SMILING: Laurel Lawson as Venus is flying in the air with arms spread wide, wheels spinning, and supported by Alice Sheppard as Andromeda who is lifting from the ground below.  0,0,1    themove                             THE MOVE: Plan Accordingly. "
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Since 2004, David Landis has worked from his sculpture studio at 97 Georgia Avenue in the burgeoning Summerhill neighborhood. Landis is perhaps best known for his casting work, turning out large scale, publicly commissioned and smaller private pieces. His works can be seen everywhere from the Eastside Atlanta BeltLine trail to the Pierre Baudis Convention Center in Toulouse, France.

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Article

Wednesday August 21, 2019 11:40 am EDT
The longstanding Summerhill-based artist talks about his sculpture work and the changing neighborhood | more...

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  string(105) "Juried exhibit of one man’s trash as another man’s treasure comes to 378 to celebrate Deacon Lunchbox"
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  string(8761) "Think “waste not, want not,” as my mother used to say, or “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure,” as Kelly Hogan sings on The Jody Grind’s 1991 album of the same name. Those are shorthand themes for Repurposed, a special two-day-only (July 26-27), juried art exhibition at 378, the newly launched gallery and performance space on Clifton Road in Candler Park. Friday’s opening includes a celebration of the life and times of Deacon Lunchbox hosted by Bill Taft, featuring live music, film/video, and poetry by guest performers.

The Repurposed call for submissions specifically solicits two- and three-dimensional works including ready-mades, assemblages, found objects, aesthetically repurposed items, artistically reused interactives, curbside manipulatives, and over-painted prints and paintings. From such a wide casting call, a rogue’s gallery of offbeat, second-hand wonders will be on display in a fitting (repurposed building) showcase.

“The idea is to get people to view repurposed items as valuable in some way,” says chief juror Clare Butler. “It’s a commentary on our throw-away culture and the notion that, when you think something only has one purpose, you discard it after using it, even though it may have meaning for someone else.”

Speaking of repurposing, as Lady Clare, Butler was an original member of Now Explosion, a pioneering DIY-pop band which embodied the kitschy glam-drag-dance scene that flourished in Atlanta in the 1980s. Lady Clare also made regular appearances on the American Music Show, a queer public-access TV program produced in Atlanta between 1981 and 2005, which featured local celebs including RuPaul, Larry Tee, DeAundra Peek, Duffy Odum, Tom Zarrilli, Lady Bunny, and Jayne County.

Zarrilli, an actor, journalist, former club impresario, and retired school librarian, was recruited to manage 378 by singer-songwriter Clay Harper, who, with his business partner Mike Nelson, co-own the building, along with being the co-founders of Atlanta’s Fellini’s Pizza. At the opening in May, Harper performed selections from his most recent album, Bleak Beauty, in the performance space downstairs from the main gallery, followed by a set from Kevn Kinney & Friends.

For the opening of Repurposed, Zarrilli is delving into the archives to pay tribute to Deacon Lunchbox, the stage name of poet-performance artist Tim Ruttenber. A gifted language wrangler and fearless performer, Ruttenber possessed a sharply honed sense of the absurd and a keen eye for the devil’s details. Rarely deviating from a bellowing rant, Deacon Lunchbox recited poetic ruminations, which he called “redneck psychobabble,” on subjects ranging from lumberjacking, bikers, sex, and terrorism to suburban blight and cheese-and-pickle sandwiches. Usually, he accompanied himself by smacking the side of a surplus naval torpedo with a carpenter’s hammer and hollering into a sheetrock bucket to achieve special reverb effects. In 1992, on the way back to Atlanta from a gig in Pensacola, Florida, Ruttenber perished in an automobile accident along with two members of The Jody Grind, Robert Hayes and Rob Clayton.

“I look back on Deacon Lunchbox as a living found object, a stranger in a strange band,” Zarrilli says.

The same socio-cultural impetus that spawned Now Explosion and Deacon Lunchbox begat the Opal Foxx Quartet, which included Ruttenber, Taft, and lead vocalist Benjamin (Robert Dickerson, who died in 1999). The latter was the subject of Jem Cohen and Peter Sillen’s award-winning documentary film Benjamin Smoke (2000). Back in the day, Zarrilli successively managed the Nitery and Celebrity Club, two venues located blocks apart on Ponce De Leon, where these and many similarly inclined artists frequently performed.

“Bill (Taft) and others in his circle are the last remaining connections to that milieu,” Zarrilli says.

Among the scheduled tributeers is Rupert Fike, whose most recent book, Hello the House: Poems (Snake Nation Press), was named one of 2018’s “Books All Georgians Should Read” by the Georgia Center for the Book. James Kelly, frontman for Slim Chance & the Convicts, will perform two songs: "Loweena (the Urban Redneck Queen)” — which Deacon Lunchbox regularly sang with the band at the Austin Avenue Buffet and other “redneck underground” haunts, most of which are long gone — and “I Miss You Most on Sundays,” a poignant remembrance of Ruttenber by way of his passion for NASCAR racing.

Vintage footage of Deacon Lunchbox will be screened, including Neil Fried’s short feature film, Lawrence of Lawrenceville Highway, and “home video” shot by Judy Rushin (now an art professor at Florida State University) of an outing to Road Atlanta in which Deacon, using a can of insect repellent as a microphone, interviews “the greatest American race car driver from France” (Taft). A concert clip of Deacon performing with the Opal Foxx Quartet on the Georgia state capitol steps may also be included.

“Deacon’s style was assemblage,” says Taft. “On stage, he was a kinetic sculpture, waving a chainsaw, shooting a blank gun, banging a hammer on an oil drum, flashing plastic breasts. His life was dedicated to repurpose. In the mid-’80s, he exiled himself from the hippie era, left the mountains of North Carolina, moved to the heart of midtown, and refurbished his life. He was born again as a poet and performer.”

In Western art history, the tradition of repurposing objects for artistic purposes stretches back through millennia. Butler recalls being dazzled as a youngster by an unusual painting she ran across in an art book. Vertumnus, a portrait by Giuseppe Arcimboldo, a Mannerist artist, was painted in Milan around  1590–1591. It depicts Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II with a face and torso fashioned from flowers, fruits, and vegetables, symbolizing the Roman god of seasonal metamorphosis and natural bounty.

“I was fascinated by that painting and the idea of combining random things to create a recognizable image,” Butler says.

In the 20th and 21st centuries, the technique of altering and recombining pre-fab and found objects to serve the artistic muse is manifest across categories ranging from surrealism and pop to minimalism and “visionary” (contemporary folk) art. A few decades ago, Atlanta-based artist and musician Lonnie Holley initially garnered international attention with his deeply evocative assemblages constructed from discarded objects (farm implements, bicycle parts, furniture, bric-a-brac) and repurposed materials (wood, cloth, glass, wire, metal), which were found on the side of the road, along railroad tracks, in fields, drainage ditches, construction sites, and everywhere else his keen curiosity led him.

“When people use material like that, in what’s considered an ‘untrained’ manner, some people say it’s because they can’t afford art supplies, but that’s beside the point,” Butler observes. “They’re using what’s available as an artistic medium, which is relevant to the artist’s life and experiences. As a result, the art is more meaningful than if they went to an art supply store and bought a nice set of acrylic paints.”

Repurposed includes works by local Atlanta and out-of-town artists. Among the submissions are pieces by Lanny Brewster, Susan Cipcic, Melissia Fernander, Benjamin Harubin, Karen Hennessee, Tim Hunter, Rob Lombardo, William Makepeace, Patty Nelson Merrifield, Rob Nixon, Leisa Rich, Blake Wilkerson, John Woodson, and Cindy Zarrilli. Full disclosure: your Listening Post correspondent has a small piece in the show.

“My personal taste tends toward found objects, which have been repurposed into an artistic vision by combining or manipulating them, rather than something picked up by somebody that coincidentally looks like something else,” Butler says.

Regardless of genre, technique, or motivation, elevating the status of discarded things and encouraging their accumulation runs against popular cultural trends focused on decluttering, “death cleaning,” and filtering out possessions that fail to “spark joy.” Butler views the situation through her own lens.

“I don’t think you should hang onto things you don’t want,” she says. “On the other hand, re-envisioning or reimagining things is a way to entertain yourself and create the feeling that value in the objects around you arises from their artistic, rather than utilitarian, nature.”

“If something doesn’t spark joy,” Butler adds, “reuse or repurpose it so it does.”

Or, as Deacon Lunchbox used to say: “Life is an illusion, so you might as well make it a good one.”"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(9414) "Think “waste not, want not,” as my mother used to say, or “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure,” as Kelly Hogan sings on The Jody Grind’s 1991 album of the same name. Those are shorthand themes for Repurposed, a special two-day-only (July 26-27), juried art exhibition at 378, the newly launched gallery and performance space on Clifton Road in Candler Park. Friday’s opening includes a celebration of the life and times of Deacon Lunchbox hosted by Bill Taft, featuring live music, film/video, and poetry by guest performers.

The Repurposed call for submissions specifically solicits two- and three-dimensional works including ready-mades, assemblages, found objects, aesthetically repurposed items, artistically reused interactives, curbside manipulatives, and over-painted prints and paintings. From such a wide casting call, a rogue’s gallery of offbeat, second-hand wonders will be on display in a fitting (repurposed building) showcase.

“The idea is to get people to view repurposed items as valuable in some way,” says chief juror Clare Butler. “It’s a commentary on our throw-away culture and the notion that, when you think something only has one purpose, you discard it after using it, even though it may have meaning for someone else.”

Speaking of repurposing, as Lady Clare, Butler was an original member of [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_TbP0g1EYQ|Now Explosion], a pioneering DIY-pop band which embodied the kitschy glam-drag-dance scene that flourished in Atlanta in the 1980s. Lady Clare also made regular appearances on the [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqAMHzXGQck|American Music Show], a queer public-access TV program produced in Atlanta between 1981 and 2005, which featured local celebs including RuPaul, Larry Tee, DeAundra Peek, Duffy Odum, Tom Zarrilli, Lady Bunny, and Jayne County.

Zarrilli, an actor, journalist, former club impresario, and retired school librarian, was recruited to manage 378 by singer-songwriter Clay Harper, who, with his business partner Mike Nelson, co-own the building, along with being the co-founders of Atlanta’s Fellini’s Pizza. At the opening in May, Harper performed selections from his most recent album, [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1WMBK0hIO8&list=PLI_C5jMT4w2phHabKaIq3dbGRTcnGuOdK|Bleak Beauty], in the performance space downstairs from the main gallery, followed by a set from Kevn Kinney & Friends.

For the opening of Repurposed, Zarrilli is delving into the archives to pay tribute to [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ffo0e99HL7c|Deacon Lunchbox], the stage name of poet-performance artist Tim Ruttenber. A gifted language wrangler and fearless performer, Ruttenber possessed a sharply honed sense of the absurd and a keen eye for the devil’s details. Rarely deviating from a bellowing rant, Deacon Lunchbox recited poetic ruminations, which he called “redneck psychobabble,” on subjects ranging from lumberjacking, bikers, sex, and terrorism to suburban blight and cheese-and-pickle sandwiches. Usually, he accompanied himself by smacking the side of a surplus naval torpedo with a carpenter’s hammer and hollering into a sheetrock bucket to achieve special reverb effects. In 1992, on the way back to Atlanta from a gig in Pensacola, Florida, Ruttenber perished in an automobile accident along with two members of The Jody Grind, Robert Hayes and Rob Clayton.

“I look back on Deacon Lunchbox as a living found object, a stranger in a strange band,” Zarrilli says.

The same socio-cultural impetus that spawned Now Explosion and Deacon Lunchbox begat the [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4B26mB1hFxs|Opal Foxx Quartet], which included Ruttenber, Taft, and lead vocalist Benjamin (Robert Dickerson, who died in 1999). The latter was the subject of Jem Cohen and Peter Sillen’s award-winning documentary film [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iaSLSCXOZLQ|Benjamin Smoke] (2000). Back in the day, Zarrilli successively managed the Nitery and Celebrity Club, two venues located blocks apart on Ponce De Leon, where these and many similarly inclined artists frequently performed.

“Bill (Taft) and others in his circle are the last remaining connections to that milieu,” Zarrilli says.

Among the scheduled tributeers is Rupert Fike, whose most recent book, [http://snakenation.press/fikecvrhouse-indd|Hello the House: Poems] (Snake Nation Press), was named one of 2018’s “Books All Georgians Should Read” by the [http://snakenation.press/fikecvrhouse-indd|Georgia Center for the Book]. James Kelly, frontman for Slim Chance & the Convicts, will perform two songs: "Loweena (the Urban Redneck Queen)” — which Deacon Lunchbox regularly sang with the band at the Austin Avenue Buffet and other “redneck underground” haunts, most of which are long gone — and “I Miss You Most on Sundays,” a poignant remembrance of Ruttenber by way of his passion for NASCAR racing.

Vintage footage of Deacon Lunchbox will be screened, including Neil Fried’s short feature film, ''Lawrence of Lawrenceville Highway'', and “home video” shot by Judy Rushin (now an art professor at Florida State University) of an outing to Road Atlanta in which Deacon, using a can of insect repellent as a microphone, interviews “the greatest American race car driver from France” (Taft). A concert clip of Deacon performing with the Opal Foxx Quartet on the Georgia state capitol steps may also be included.

“Deacon’s style was assemblage,” says Taft. “On stage, he was a kinetic sculpture, waving a chainsaw, shooting a blank gun, banging a hammer on an oil drum, flashing plastic breasts. His life was dedicated to repurpose. In the mid-’80s, he exiled himself from the hippie era, left the mountains of North Carolina, moved to the heart of midtown, and refurbished his life. He was born again as a poet and performer.”

In Western art history, the tradition of repurposing objects for artistic purposes stretches back through millennia. Butler recalls being dazzled as a youngster by an unusual painting she ran across in an art book. ''[https://artsandculture.google.com/asset/rudolf-ii-of-habsburg-as-vertumnus/TAGn3nhWHkbIBA?hl=en&ms={"x":0.5,"y":0.5,"z":8.51798384779611,"size":{"width":2.6837831785647626,"height":1.2375226574274376}}|Vertumnus],'' a portrait by Giuseppe Arcimboldo, a Mannerist artist, was painted in Milan around  1590–1591. It depicts Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II with a face and torso fashioned from flowers, fruits, and vegetables, symbolizing the Roman god of seasonal metamorphosis and natural bounty.

“I was fascinated by that painting and the idea of combining random things to create a recognizable image,” Butler says.

In the 20th and 21st centuries, the technique of altering and recombining pre-fab and found objects to serve the artistic muse is manifest across categories ranging from surrealism and pop to minimalism and “visionary” (contemporary folk) art. A few decades ago, Atlanta-based artist and musician [https://www.lonnieholley.com/|Lonnie Holley] initially garnered international attention with his deeply evocative assemblages constructed from discarded objects (farm implements, bicycle parts, furniture, bric-a-brac) and repurposed materials (wood, cloth, glass, wire, metal), which were found on the side of the road, along railroad tracks, in fields, drainage ditches, construction sites, and everywhere else his keen curiosity led him.

“When people use material like that, in what’s considered an ‘untrained’ manner, some people say it’s because they can’t afford art supplies, but that’s beside the point,” Butler observes. “They’re using what’s available as an artistic medium, which is relevant to the artist’s life and experiences. As a result, the art is more meaningful than if they went to an art supply store and bought a nice set of acrylic paints.”

Repurposed includes works by local Atlanta and out-of-town artists. Among the submissions are pieces by Lanny Brewster, Susan Cipcic, Melissia Fernander, Benjamin Harubin, Karen Hennessee, Tim Hunter, Rob Lombardo, William Makepeace, Patty Nelson Merrifield, Rob Nixon, Leisa Rich, Blake Wilkerson, John Woodson, and Cindy Zarrilli. [[Full disclosure: your Listening Post correspondent has a small piece in the show.]

“My personal taste tends toward found objects, which have been repurposed into an artistic vision by combining or manipulating them, rather than something picked up by somebody that coincidentally looks like something else,” Butler says.

Regardless of genre, technique, or motivation, elevating the status of discarded things and encouraging their accumulation runs against popular cultural trends focused on decluttering, “death cleaning,” and filtering out possessions that fail to “spark joy.” Butler views the situation through her own lens.

“I don’t think you should hang onto things you don’t want,” she says. “On the other hand, re-envisioning or reimagining things is a way to entertain yourself and create the feeling that value in the objects around you arises from their artistic, rather than utilitarian, nature.”

“If something doesn’t spark joy,” Butler adds, “reuse or repurpose it so it does.”

Or, as Deacon Lunchbox used to say: “Life is an illusion, so you might as well make it a good one.”"
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  string(9338) " 2 Harubin Repurposed Crap  2019-07-08T21:36:33+00:00 2 Harubin Repurposed Crap.jpg   Well, and then she said ......  Juried exhibit of one man’s trash as another man’s treasure comes to 378 to celebrate Deacon Lunchbox 20191  2019-07-08T21:23:32+00:00 LISTENING POST: Repurposed — but is it art? tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris DOUG DELOACH Doug DeLoach 2019-07-08T21:23:32+00:00  Think “waste not, want not,” as my mother used to say, or “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure,” as Kelly Hogan sings on The Jody Grind’s 1991 album of the same name. Those are shorthand themes for Repurposed, a special two-day-only (July 26-27), juried art exhibition at 378, the newly launched gallery and performance space on Clifton Road in Candler Park. Friday’s opening includes a celebration of the life and times of Deacon Lunchbox hosted by Bill Taft, featuring live music, film/video, and poetry by guest performers.

The Repurposed call for submissions specifically solicits two- and three-dimensional works including ready-mades, assemblages, found objects, aesthetically repurposed items, artistically reused interactives, curbside manipulatives, and over-painted prints and paintings. From such a wide casting call, a rogue’s gallery of offbeat, second-hand wonders will be on display in a fitting (repurposed building) showcase.

“The idea is to get people to view repurposed items as valuable in some way,” says chief juror Clare Butler. “It’s a commentary on our throw-away culture and the notion that, when you think something only has one purpose, you discard it after using it, even though it may have meaning for someone else.”

Speaking of repurposing, as Lady Clare, Butler was an original member of Now Explosion, a pioneering DIY-pop band which embodied the kitschy glam-drag-dance scene that flourished in Atlanta in the 1980s. Lady Clare also made regular appearances on the American Music Show, a queer public-access TV program produced in Atlanta between 1981 and 2005, which featured local celebs including RuPaul, Larry Tee, DeAundra Peek, Duffy Odum, Tom Zarrilli, Lady Bunny, and Jayne County.

Zarrilli, an actor, journalist, former club impresario, and retired school librarian, was recruited to manage 378 by singer-songwriter Clay Harper, who, with his business partner Mike Nelson, co-own the building, along with being the co-founders of Atlanta’s Fellini’s Pizza. At the opening in May, Harper performed selections from his most recent album, Bleak Beauty, in the performance space downstairs from the main gallery, followed by a set from Kevn Kinney & Friends.

For the opening of Repurposed, Zarrilli is delving into the archives to pay tribute to Deacon Lunchbox, the stage name of poet-performance artist Tim Ruttenber. A gifted language wrangler and fearless performer, Ruttenber possessed a sharply honed sense of the absurd and a keen eye for the devil’s details. Rarely deviating from a bellowing rant, Deacon Lunchbox recited poetic ruminations, which he called “redneck psychobabble,” on subjects ranging from lumberjacking, bikers, sex, and terrorism to suburban blight and cheese-and-pickle sandwiches. Usually, he accompanied himself by smacking the side of a surplus naval torpedo with a carpenter’s hammer and hollering into a sheetrock bucket to achieve special reverb effects. In 1992, on the way back to Atlanta from a gig in Pensacola, Florida, Ruttenber perished in an automobile accident along with two members of The Jody Grind, Robert Hayes and Rob Clayton.

“I look back on Deacon Lunchbox as a living found object, a stranger in a strange band,” Zarrilli says.

The same socio-cultural impetus that spawned Now Explosion and Deacon Lunchbox begat the Opal Foxx Quartet, which included Ruttenber, Taft, and lead vocalist Benjamin (Robert Dickerson, who died in 1999). The latter was the subject of Jem Cohen and Peter Sillen’s award-winning documentary film Benjamin Smoke (2000). Back in the day, Zarrilli successively managed the Nitery and Celebrity Club, two venues located blocks apart on Ponce De Leon, where these and many similarly inclined artists frequently performed.

“Bill (Taft) and others in his circle are the last remaining connections to that milieu,” Zarrilli says.

Among the scheduled tributeers is Rupert Fike, whose most recent book, Hello the House: Poems (Snake Nation Press), was named one of 2018’s “Books All Georgians Should Read” by the Georgia Center for the Book. James Kelly, frontman for Slim Chance & the Convicts, will perform two songs: "Loweena (the Urban Redneck Queen)” — which Deacon Lunchbox regularly sang with the band at the Austin Avenue Buffet and other “redneck underground” haunts, most of which are long gone — and “I Miss You Most on Sundays,” a poignant remembrance of Ruttenber by way of his passion for NASCAR racing.

Vintage footage of Deacon Lunchbox will be screened, including Neil Fried’s short feature film, Lawrence of Lawrenceville Highway, and “home video” shot by Judy Rushin (now an art professor at Florida State University) of an outing to Road Atlanta in which Deacon, using a can of insect repellent as a microphone, interviews “the greatest American race car driver from France” (Taft). A concert clip of Deacon performing with the Opal Foxx Quartet on the Georgia state capitol steps may also be included.

“Deacon’s style was assemblage,” says Taft. “On stage, he was a kinetic sculpture, waving a chainsaw, shooting a blank gun, banging a hammer on an oil drum, flashing plastic breasts. His life was dedicated to repurpose. In the mid-’80s, he exiled himself from the hippie era, left the mountains of North Carolina, moved to the heart of midtown, and refurbished his life. He was born again as a poet and performer.”

In Western art history, the tradition of repurposing objects for artistic purposes stretches back through millennia. Butler recalls being dazzled as a youngster by an unusual painting she ran across in an art book. Vertumnus, a portrait by Giuseppe Arcimboldo, a Mannerist artist, was painted in Milan around  1590–1591. It depicts Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II with a face and torso fashioned from flowers, fruits, and vegetables, symbolizing the Roman god of seasonal metamorphosis and natural bounty.

“I was fascinated by that painting and the idea of combining random things to create a recognizable image,” Butler says.

In the 20th and 21st centuries, the technique of altering and recombining pre-fab and found objects to serve the artistic muse is manifest across categories ranging from surrealism and pop to minimalism and “visionary” (contemporary folk) art. A few decades ago, Atlanta-based artist and musician Lonnie Holley initially garnered international attention with his deeply evocative assemblages constructed from discarded objects (farm implements, bicycle parts, furniture, bric-a-brac) and repurposed materials (wood, cloth, glass, wire, metal), which were found on the side of the road, along railroad tracks, in fields, drainage ditches, construction sites, and everywhere else his keen curiosity led him.

“When people use material like that, in what’s considered an ‘untrained’ manner, some people say it’s because they can’t afford art supplies, but that’s beside the point,” Butler observes. “They’re using what’s available as an artistic medium, which is relevant to the artist’s life and experiences. As a result, the art is more meaningful than if they went to an art supply store and bought a nice set of acrylic paints.”

Repurposed includes works by local Atlanta and out-of-town artists. Among the submissions are pieces by Lanny Brewster, Susan Cipcic, Melissia Fernander, Benjamin Harubin, Karen Hennessee, Tim Hunter, Rob Lombardo, William Makepeace, Patty Nelson Merrifield, Rob Nixon, Leisa Rich, Blake Wilkerson, John Woodson, and Cindy Zarrilli. Full disclosure: your Listening Post correspondent has a small piece in the show.

“My personal taste tends toward found objects, which have been repurposed into an artistic vision by combining or manipulating them, rather than something picked up by somebody that coincidentally looks like something else,” Butler says.

Regardless of genre, technique, or motivation, elevating the status of discarded things and encouraging their accumulation runs against popular cultural trends focused on decluttering, “death cleaning,” and filtering out possessions that fail to “spark joy.” Butler views the situation through her own lens.

“I don’t think you should hang onto things you don’t want,” she says. “On the other hand, re-envisioning or reimagining things is a way to entertain yourself and create the feeling that value in the objects around you arises from their artistic, rather than utilitarian, nature.”

“If something doesn’t spark joy,” Butler adds, “reuse or repurpose it so it does.”

Or, as Deacon Lunchbox used to say: “Life is an illusion, so you might as well make it a good one.”    Benjamin Harubin "REPURPOSED CRAP:" Artist: Benjamin Harubin, metal, plastic, paper wood.  0,0,2                                 LISTENING POST: Repurposed — but is it art? "
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Article

Monday July 8, 2019 05:23 pm EDT
Juried exhibit of one man’s trash as another man’s treasure comes to 378 to celebrate Deacon Lunchbox | more...
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  ["title"]=>
  string(34) "SCENES & MOTIONS: Sleepless nights"
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  string(60) "'The Hero's Wife' and 'Harold and the Purple Crayon' onstage"
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  string(60) "'The Hero's Wife' and 'Harold and the Purple Crayon' onstage"
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  string(8817) "“To die, to sleep — to sleep, perchance to dream. Ay, there's the rub, for in that sleep of death what dreams may come …” — Hamlet

As far back as I can remember, I’ve been fascinated by sleep. Sleep, dreams, and nightmares.

What happens to me when I am asleep? What happens to my wife as she lies next to me? What happens to our dogs? What do other people feel when they are sleeping? Why do we have nightmares? What does a small child dream about?

Two of Atlanta’s most reliably creative spaces are pulling audiences into very different dreamscapes. Synchronicity Theatre’s The Hero’s Wife confronts the violent night terrors of a war veteran who unknowingly attacks his young wife in the middle of the night. Meanwhile, just a few blocks away, the Center for Puppetry Arts wields invisible technology to conjure the fantastic midnight reveries of Harold and The Purple Crayon.

At first glance, the two world-premiere productions could not be more different. Yet both make intense private moments palpably real, and feature characters (and local artists) exhibiting strengths and skills we haven’t seen before.

Chicago-based playwright Aline Lathrop’s sharp one-act at Synchronicity grabs us from the opening moments: A man and a woman are lying asleep together when he suddenly screams and tries to punch her in the face. She ducks instinctively, but his second blow sends her sprawling. Just as quickly, he falls back into a deep sleep, unaware that anything has happened. End scene.

For the next 80 minutes, the action shifts back and forth, in short emotional scenes, from waking to sleeping moments. What we are seeing are the first few months after Cameron, a 40-year-old Navy SEAL, is thrown back into civilian life with his young wife Karyssa following his final tour of duty in Iraq, during which he was MIA for several weeks. What happened to him? What did he do while he was missing in action? What wartime horrors is he reliving in his sleep? What is he screaming during his violent nightmares, and why is he screaming in Arabic, a language he claims not to speak or understand? Is he hallucinating? Is he going insane?

Cam doesn’t remember what happens when he’s asleep and, like so many veterans, he won't talk about what happened overseas or acknowledge he’s suffering from PTSD. Karyssa, a yoga teacher barely out of college, fears her husband will commit suicide if she tells him he’s hitting her. She makes excuses for her bruises when he asks about them. As the nightmare violence escalates, the characters slowly start to switch places during the day. Cam, reluctant to ever leave the house, begins losing his macho, romantic, lover-in-charge attitude, becoming increasingly paranoid, impulsive, fragile, and vulnerable. We watch as Karyssa evolves from a sweet, sexy, emotionally open wife and nervous partner walking on eggshells to a physically strong, emotionally guarded woman sharing a bed with a trained killer.

Joe Sykes is convincing as a strong, damaged man desperate to hide his emotional problems. But since Lathrop designed her play (quite smartly) from Karyssa’s point of view, the most powerful character arc belongs to Rebecca Robles’ young newlywed as she fights physically and emotionally to save herself and the man she still loves.

Using only light shifts and subtle background sounds, director Rachel May and her design team slide the drama from day to night and back almost seamlessly. Sykes’ Cameron and Robles’ Karyssa slip in and out of the double bed where they make love, snuggle, and fall sleep, only to have their romantic bliss erupt into sudden violence. The all aqua-and-white set appears realistic at first glance, but some of the ceiling, walls, and empty bookshelves are slightly off-kilter. Things are not what they seem.

As Karyssa watches her husband sleep peacefully, she says, “No one ever really knows another person, do they?” If other people are not always who we thought they were, when should we trust our perceptions of anything else? What is objective reality? How different is memory from fantasy? If we love or fear a person or a place or a thing, does that make it real, regardless of whether anyone else perceives it?

Questioning or trusting the power of imagination may be the core of Crockett Johnson’s 1955 classic children’s picture book, Harold and The Purple Crayon, which, like The Hero’s Wife, begins (we can assume) at night in a bedroom.

One evening, after thinking it over for some time, Harold decided to go for a walk in the moonlight. There wasn’t any moon, and Harold needed a moon for a walk in the moonlight. And he needed something to walk on. He made a long straight path so he wouldn’t get lost. And he set off on his walk, taking his big purple crayon with him. But he didn’t seem to be getting anywhere on the long straight path. So he left the path… .

Just like in all five “Purple Crayon” books, Harold, in the Center’s ingenious production, creates an entire world with his crayon. When he's hungry, he draws a picnic lunch of nine pies. When he draws a dragon, then becomes scared of it, his purple crayon fashions an ocean and a sailboat for his escape just in time. He draws himself over the ledge of a cliff and then quickly sketches a hot-air balloon to safely float away. And so on. Eventually, our little hero longs for home and begins drawing dozens of windows in high-rise buildings hoping to “find” his own window with its view of the same moon that always hangs above him. He finally draws his window around the moon and decides he must be home.

“And then Harold made his bed. He got in it and he drew up the covers.”

Except he’s not home. Joshua A. Krisch, in an essay about the book on Fatherly, an online site for dads, calls Harold and the Purple Crayon  “Inception for kids.” He goes further, noting that Peter Nolan's science fiction action film “suggests that you can fall into your own dreams so deeply that you never escape, and the best you can hope for is that your imagination will recreate a world so similar to your own that you cannot recognize it for what it is — a dream, a nightmare. This, too, is Harold’s fate. He ends the book lost in a land entirely defined by his own imagination. It has a window, a moon, a bed, but it isn’t home. Nonetheless, Harold drifts off to sleep content.”

In director Jon Ludwig’s original and delightfully trippy production, Harold, his crayon, and many of the objects and creatures he “draws” are puppets that gently glow under bright black lights in dreamy shades of vivid purple, pink, and magenta. Whatever purple lines Harold draws appear magically in front of and around him: Purple train tracks run beneath his feet, a purple boat floats by. At times, he uses his crayon like a wand to create whole buildings to explore or a sky full of stars to fly in as he takes off on his rocket ship.

How do you make imaginary lines appear to flow out of a puppet crayon? Ludwig and his team of creative geniuses at the Center adapted a 200-year old technology known as “Pepper’s Ghost.” Created in the mid-1800s, Pepper’s Ghost projected images off large glass panels to create ghostlike figures in the air. Ludwig’s team tracked down a rare sheet of very fragile, ultra-reflective material and stretched it in front of and above the stage at a 45-degree angle. Two projectors direct animations onto a screen below the stage which are reflected by the sheet into the space in front of the invisible puppeteers, who are covered in black, like ninjas.

The entire effect is wonderful, whimsical, liberating, and genuinely comforting. The large audience of young children, including my eight-year old niece and her older friends, were enchanted and amused from beginning to end. As was I. Like Crockett’s beloved books, the Puppetry Center’s 45-minute show isn’t worried about life lessons or adults setting rules or saving the day. There is just pure experience, imagination, and childhood run wild. Ludwig’s Harold and The Purple Crayon invites people of all ages to see the magic in everyday objects and ordinary moments — to create our own reality.

I’ve always aspired to try to live life as a waking, lucid dream. Or, as the magician Prospero explained to his niece in The Tempest, "We are such stuff as dreams are made on, and our little life is rounded with a sleep."

The Hero’s Wife at Synchronicity Theatre, Peachtree Pointe, 1545 Peachtree Street, now through May 5. Wednesdays through Saturdays, 8 p.m., Sundays at 5 p.m. 404 484-8636.

Harold and the Purple Crayon at Center for Puppetry Arts, 1404 Spring Street NW, now through May 26, Tuesdays through Sundays. 404 873-3391."
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  string(9083) "''“To die, to sleep — to sleep, perchance to dream. Ay, there's the rub, for in that sleep of death what dreams may come …” — Hamlet''

As far back as I can remember, I’ve been fascinated by sleep. Sleep, dreams, and nightmares.

What happens to me when I am asleep? What happens to my wife as she lies next to me? What happens to our dogs? What do other people feel when they are sleeping? Why do we have nightmares? What does a small child dream about?

Two of Atlanta’s most reliably creative spaces are pulling audiences into very different dreamscapes. Synchronicity Theatre’s ''The Hero’s Wife'' confronts the violent night terrors of a war veteran who unknowingly attacks his young wife in the middle of the night. Meanwhile, just a few blocks away, the Center for Puppetry Arts wields invisible technology to conjure the fantastic midnight reveries of ''Harold and The Purple Crayon''.

At first glance, the two world-premiere productions could not be more different. Yet both make intense private moments palpably real, and feature characters (and local artists) exhibiting strengths and skills we haven’t seen before.

Chicago-based playwright Aline Lathrop’s sharp one-act at Synchronicity grabs us from the opening moments: A man and a woman are lying asleep together when he suddenly screams and tries to punch her in the face. She ducks instinctively, but his second blow sends her sprawling. Just as quickly, he falls back into a deep sleep, unaware that anything has happened. End scene.

For the next 80 minutes, the action shifts back and forth, in short emotional scenes, from waking to sleeping moments. What we are seeing are the first few months after Cameron, a 40-year-old Navy SEAL, is thrown back into civilian life with his young wife Karyssa following his final tour of duty in Iraq, during which he was MIA for several weeks. What happened to him? What did he do while he was missing in action? What wartime horrors is he reliving in his sleep? What is he screaming during his violent nightmares, and why is he screaming in Arabic, a language he claims not to speak or understand? Is he hallucinating? Is he going insane?

Cam doesn’t remember what happens when he’s asleep and, like so many veterans, he won't talk about what happened overseas or acknowledge he’s suffering from PTSD. Karyssa, a yoga teacher barely out of college, fears her husband will commit suicide if she tells him he’s hitting her. She makes excuses for her bruises when he asks about them. As the nightmare violence escalates, the characters slowly start to switch places during the day. Cam, reluctant to ever leave the house, begins losing his macho, romantic, lover-in-charge attitude, becoming increasingly paranoid, impulsive, fragile, and vulnerable. We watch as Karyssa evolves from a sweet, sexy, emotionally open wife and nervous partner walking on eggshells to a physically strong, emotionally guarded woman sharing a bed with a trained killer.

Joe Sykes is convincing as a strong, damaged man desperate to hide his emotional problems. But since Lathrop designed her play (quite smartly) from Karyssa’s point of view, the most powerful character arc belongs to Rebecca Robles’ young newlywed as she fights physically and emotionally to save herself and the man she still loves.

Using only light shifts and subtle background sounds, director Rachel May and her design team slide the drama from day to night and back almost seamlessly. Sykes’ Cameron and Robles’ Karyssa slip in and out of the double bed where they make love, snuggle, and fall sleep, only to have their romantic bliss erupt into sudden violence. The all aqua-and-white set appears realistic at first glance, but some of the ceiling, walls, and empty bookshelves are slightly off-kilter. Things are not what they seem.

As Karyssa watches her husband sleep peacefully, she says, “No one ever really knows another person, do they?” If other people are not always who we thought they were, when should we trust our perceptions of anything else? What is objective reality? How different is memory from fantasy? If we love or fear a person or a place or a thing, does that make it real, regardless of whether anyone else perceives it?

Questioning or trusting the power of imagination may be the core of Crockett Johnson’s 1955 classic children’s picture book, ''Harold and The Purple Crayon'', which, like ''The Hero’s Wife'', begins (we can assume) at night in a bedroom.

One evening, after thinking it over for some time, Harold decided to go for a walk in the moonlight. There wasn’t any moon, and Harold needed a moon for a walk in the moonlight. And he needed something to walk on. He made a long straight path so he wouldn’t get lost. And he set off on his walk, taking his big purple crayon with him. But he didn’t seem to be getting anywhere on the long straight path. So he left the path… .

Just like in all five “Purple Crayon” books, Harold, in the Center’s ingenious production, creates an entire world with his crayon. When he's hungry, he draws a picnic lunch of nine pies. When he draws a dragon, then becomes scared of it, his purple crayon fashions an ocean and a sailboat for his escape just in time. He draws himself over the ledge of a cliff and then quickly sketches a hot-air balloon to safely float away. And so on. Eventually, our little hero longs for home and begins drawing dozens of windows in high-rise buildings hoping to “find” his own window with its view of the same moon that always hangs above him. He finally draws his window around the moon and decides he must be home.

''“''And then Harold made his bed. He got in it and he drew up the covers.''”''

Except he’s not home. Joshua A. Krisch, [https://www.fatherly.com/play/harold-purple-crayon-childrens-book-dark-reality/|in an essay about the book] on Fatherly, an online site for dads, calls ''Harold and the Purple Crayon''  “''Inception'' for kids.” He goes further, noting that Peter Nolan's science fiction action film “suggests that you can fall into your own dreams so deeply that you never escape, and the best you can hope for is that your imagination will recreate a world so similar to your own that you cannot recognize it for what it is — a dream, a nightmare. This, too, is Harold’s fate. He ends the book lost in a land entirely defined by his own imagination. It has a window, a moon, a bed, but it isn’t home. Nonetheless, Harold drifts off to sleep content.”

In director Jon Ludwig’s original and delightfully trippy production, Harold, his crayon, and many of the objects and creatures he “draws” are puppets that gently glow under bright black lights in dreamy shades of vivid purple, pink, and magenta. Whatever purple lines Harold draws appear magically in front of and around him: Purple train tracks run beneath his feet, a purple boat floats by. At times, he uses his crayon like a wand to create whole buildings to explore or a sky full of stars to fly in as he takes off on his rocket ship.

How do you make imaginary lines appear to flow out of a puppet crayon? Ludwig and his team of creative geniuses at the Center adapted a 200-year old technology known as “Pepper’s Ghost.” Created in the mid-1800s, Pepper’s Ghost projected images off large glass panels to create ghostlike figures in the air. Ludwig’s team tracked down a rare sheet of very fragile, ultra-reflective material and stretched it in front of and above the stage at a 45-degree angle. Two projectors direct animations onto a screen below the stage which are reflected by the sheet into the space in front of the invisible puppeteers, who are covered in black, like ninjas.

The entire effect is wonderful, whimsical, liberating, and genuinely comforting. The large audience of young children, including my eight-year old niece and her older friends, were enchanted and amused from beginning to end. As was I. Like Crockett’s beloved books, the Puppetry Center’s 45-minute show isn’t worried about life lessons or adults setting rules or saving the day. There is just pure experience, imagination, and childhood run wild. Ludwig’s ''Harold and The Purple Crayon'' invites people of all ages to see the magic in everyday objects and ordinary moments — to create our own reality.

I’ve always aspired to try to live life as a waking, lucid dream. Or, as the magician Prospero explained to'' ''his niece in The Tempest, "We are such stuff as dreams are made on, and our little life is rounded with a sleep."

The Hero’s Wife ''at [https://www.synchrotheatre.com/season/20/the-heros-wife|Synchronicity Theatre], Peachtree Pointe, 1545 Peachtree Street, now through May 5. Wednesdays through Saturdays, 8 p.m., Sundays at 5 p.m. 404 484-8636.''

Harold and the Purple Crayon ''at [http://www.puppet.org/buy-tickets/2018-19/harold-and-the-purple-crayon/|Center for Puppetry Arts], 1404 Spring Street NW, now through May 26, Tuesdays through Sundays. 404 873-3391.''"
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  string(9332) " Harold.300dpi  2019-05-02T16:38:03+00:00 Harold.300dpi.jpg    scenes&motions 'The Hero's Wife' and 'Harold and the Purple Crayon' onstage 17099  2019-05-02T16:39:26+00:00 SCENES & MOTIONS: Sleepless nights tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris EDWARD MCNALLY Edward McNally 2019-05-02T16:39:26+00:00  “To die, to sleep — to sleep, perchance to dream. Ay, there's the rub, for in that sleep of death what dreams may come …” — Hamlet

As far back as I can remember, I’ve been fascinated by sleep. Sleep, dreams, and nightmares.

What happens to me when I am asleep? What happens to my wife as she lies next to me? What happens to our dogs? What do other people feel when they are sleeping? Why do we have nightmares? What does a small child dream about?

Two of Atlanta’s most reliably creative spaces are pulling audiences into very different dreamscapes. Synchronicity Theatre’s The Hero’s Wife confronts the violent night terrors of a war veteran who unknowingly attacks his young wife in the middle of the night. Meanwhile, just a few blocks away, the Center for Puppetry Arts wields invisible technology to conjure the fantastic midnight reveries of Harold and The Purple Crayon.

At first glance, the two world-premiere productions could not be more different. Yet both make intense private moments palpably real, and feature characters (and local artists) exhibiting strengths and skills we haven’t seen before.

Chicago-based playwright Aline Lathrop’s sharp one-act at Synchronicity grabs us from the opening moments: A man and a woman are lying asleep together when he suddenly screams and tries to punch her in the face. She ducks instinctively, but his second blow sends her sprawling. Just as quickly, he falls back into a deep sleep, unaware that anything has happened. End scene.

For the next 80 minutes, the action shifts back and forth, in short emotional scenes, from waking to sleeping moments. What we are seeing are the first few months after Cameron, a 40-year-old Navy SEAL, is thrown back into civilian life with his young wife Karyssa following his final tour of duty in Iraq, during which he was MIA for several weeks. What happened to him? What did he do while he was missing in action? What wartime horrors is he reliving in his sleep? What is he screaming during his violent nightmares, and why is he screaming in Arabic, a language he claims not to speak or understand? Is he hallucinating? Is he going insane?

Cam doesn’t remember what happens when he’s asleep and, like so many veterans, he won't talk about what happened overseas or acknowledge he’s suffering from PTSD. Karyssa, a yoga teacher barely out of college, fears her husband will commit suicide if she tells him he’s hitting her. She makes excuses for her bruises when he asks about them. As the nightmare violence escalates, the characters slowly start to switch places during the day. Cam, reluctant to ever leave the house, begins losing his macho, romantic, lover-in-charge attitude, becoming increasingly paranoid, impulsive, fragile, and vulnerable. We watch as Karyssa evolves from a sweet, sexy, emotionally open wife and nervous partner walking on eggshells to a physically strong, emotionally guarded woman sharing a bed with a trained killer.

Joe Sykes is convincing as a strong, damaged man desperate to hide his emotional problems. But since Lathrop designed her play (quite smartly) from Karyssa’s point of view, the most powerful character arc belongs to Rebecca Robles’ young newlywed as she fights physically and emotionally to save herself and the man she still loves.

Using only light shifts and subtle background sounds, director Rachel May and her design team slide the drama from day to night and back almost seamlessly. Sykes’ Cameron and Robles’ Karyssa slip in and out of the double bed where they make love, snuggle, and fall sleep, only to have their romantic bliss erupt into sudden violence. The all aqua-and-white set appears realistic at first glance, but some of the ceiling, walls, and empty bookshelves are slightly off-kilter. Things are not what they seem.

As Karyssa watches her husband sleep peacefully, she says, “No one ever really knows another person, do they?” If other people are not always who we thought they were, when should we trust our perceptions of anything else? What is objective reality? How different is memory from fantasy? If we love or fear a person or a place or a thing, does that make it real, regardless of whether anyone else perceives it?

Questioning or trusting the power of imagination may be the core of Crockett Johnson’s 1955 classic children’s picture book, Harold and The Purple Crayon, which, like The Hero’s Wife, begins (we can assume) at night in a bedroom.

One evening, after thinking it over for some time, Harold decided to go for a walk in the moonlight. There wasn’t any moon, and Harold needed a moon for a walk in the moonlight. And he needed something to walk on. He made a long straight path so he wouldn’t get lost. And he set off on his walk, taking his big purple crayon with him. But he didn’t seem to be getting anywhere on the long straight path. So he left the path… .

Just like in all five “Purple Crayon” books, Harold, in the Center’s ingenious production, creates an entire world with his crayon. When he's hungry, he draws a picnic lunch of nine pies. When he draws a dragon, then becomes scared of it, his purple crayon fashions an ocean and a sailboat for his escape just in time. He draws himself over the ledge of a cliff and then quickly sketches a hot-air balloon to safely float away. And so on. Eventually, our little hero longs for home and begins drawing dozens of windows in high-rise buildings hoping to “find” his own window with its view of the same moon that always hangs above him. He finally draws his window around the moon and decides he must be home.

“And then Harold made his bed. He got in it and he drew up the covers.”

Except he’s not home. Joshua A. Krisch, in an essay about the book on Fatherly, an online site for dads, calls Harold and the Purple Crayon  “Inception for kids.” He goes further, noting that Peter Nolan's science fiction action film “suggests that you can fall into your own dreams so deeply that you never escape, and the best you can hope for is that your imagination will recreate a world so similar to your own that you cannot recognize it for what it is — a dream, a nightmare. This, too, is Harold’s fate. He ends the book lost in a land entirely defined by his own imagination. It has a window, a moon, a bed, but it isn’t home. Nonetheless, Harold drifts off to sleep content.”

In director Jon Ludwig’s original and delightfully trippy production, Harold, his crayon, and many of the objects and creatures he “draws” are puppets that gently glow under bright black lights in dreamy shades of vivid purple, pink, and magenta. Whatever purple lines Harold draws appear magically in front of and around him: Purple train tracks run beneath his feet, a purple boat floats by. At times, he uses his crayon like a wand to create whole buildings to explore or a sky full of stars to fly in as he takes off on his rocket ship.

How do you make imaginary lines appear to flow out of a puppet crayon? Ludwig and his team of creative geniuses at the Center adapted a 200-year old technology known as “Pepper’s Ghost.” Created in the mid-1800s, Pepper’s Ghost projected images off large glass panels to create ghostlike figures in the air. Ludwig’s team tracked down a rare sheet of very fragile, ultra-reflective material and stretched it in front of and above the stage at a 45-degree angle. Two projectors direct animations onto a screen below the stage which are reflected by the sheet into the space in front of the invisible puppeteers, who are covered in black, like ninjas.

The entire effect is wonderful, whimsical, liberating, and genuinely comforting. The large audience of young children, including my eight-year old niece and her older friends, were enchanted and amused from beginning to end. As was I. Like Crockett’s beloved books, the Puppetry Center’s 45-minute show isn’t worried about life lessons or adults setting rules or saving the day. There is just pure experience, imagination, and childhood run wild. Ludwig’s Harold and The Purple Crayon invites people of all ages to see the magic in everyday objects and ordinary moments — to create our own reality.

I’ve always aspired to try to live life as a waking, lucid dream. Or, as the magician Prospero explained to his niece in The Tempest, "We are such stuff as dreams are made on, and our little life is rounded with a sleep."

The Hero’s Wife at Synchronicity Theatre, Peachtree Pointe, 1545 Peachtree Street, now through May 5. Wednesdays through Saturdays, 8 p.m., Sundays at 5 p.m. 404 484-8636.

Harold and the Purple Crayon at Center for Puppetry Arts, 1404 Spring Street NW, now through May 26, Tuesdays through Sundays. 404 873-3391.    Courtesy The Center for Puppetry Arts HAROLD AND THE PURPLE CRAYON: Through May 26 at the Center for Puppetry Arts.  0,0,10    scenes&motions                             SCENES & MOTIONS: Sleepless nights "
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Thursday May 2, 2019 12:39 pm EDT
'The Hero's Wife' and 'Harold and the Purple Crayon' onstage | more...
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  string(146) "The new gallery in Candler Park is a ‘pop-up shop’ for local artists; Kevn Kinney and Clay Harper provide the soundtrack for tonight's opening"
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  string(146) "The new gallery in Candler Park is a ‘pop-up shop’ for local artists; Kevn Kinney and Clay Harper provide the soundtrack for tonight's opening"
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  string(6388) "If you were taking in the sensory overload that was Clay Harper hosting his Tuesday nights in May residency at the Avondale Town Cinema last year, you will recall each night had it’s own series of art work promoting the music, art and social discourse.

The graphics, somewhat surrealist interpretations of the familiar juxtaposed with a red flower, were the work of therealfranktee, an otherwise unknown Atlanta artist, whose work is as comforting as it can be jarring.

Therealfranktee has come a long way since those Tuesday nights twelve months ago when Harper was previewing songs from his then about to be released album, Bleak Beauty. Indeed, Harper’s return to the stage proved to be a springboard for the prolific artist, who creates about five new works a week, launching his popularity into the stratosphere usually inhabited by the space-suited astronaut so often a cornerstone of his artwork.

The artist has taken his fifteen minutes and run with them. Tonight, May 2, he opens 378, a new art gallery on Clifton Road, around the corner from the Fellini's Pizza on McLendon Avenue in Candler Park.

Tonight’s opening will feature works by Tee, along with those of two other Atlanta-based artists, Anna Jensen and Ruth Franklin. Pieces from a series of postcard exchanges between artists Jack Logan and Kosmo Vinyl will also be on display.

The gallery will work as a pop-up space whenever the artists open the doors, with notices posted on Instagram and Facebook: @therealfranktee. Tonight’s opening promises to be something more than just an art exhibit. Music for the evening will be provided by Kevn Kinney and Friends. Kinney’s performance is not without reason. One of therealfranktee’s astronauts, holding a red flower, appears on the cover of Live The Love Beautiful, Drivin N Cryin’s new album, to be released June 21. It was through Harper that Kinney decided DNC should use Tee’s art for the album, the various components he provided incorporated in the package by art director Susan Archie at the World of AnArchie. Archie, a three-time Grammy winner, also designed Harper’s Bleak Beauty, the album that prompted him to organize last year’s successful Tuesday nights in May.

If such artistic incestuous isn’t enough for you, it was Harper who urged therealfranktee to open 378, reason enough for Harper to also be performing tonight.

Tee says the purpose of the gallery is “evolving,” but that his main hope is to provide a place for “local artists and musicians who need a space for a week or two, and to provide it to them if they are able to cover the operating expenses only while they are there.”

The artist/gallery operator says his art “will most likely always be represented, unless someone wants to take it down for their show.” Tee “encourages artists to reach out to book space to make sure the it gets used. The main goal of 378 is to help lift and build artists and musicians of all kinds,” he says. “I don’t have a plan. It’s just seeing where and how it evolves."

Tonight, he explains, “the artists will keep all proceeds from their sales. If money is donated for refreshments or at the door, after operating expenses are covered, those proceeds will be donated to a charity.”

Tee says that hopefully, once 378 is hosting pop-ups on a regular basis, more  I have a few ideas for  we have a few ideas as to what charity or school we will give the proceeds to after expenses.

The artists exhibiting at the opening were chosen because “they are who are in my life at the moment.” Tee moves in impressive circles. Ruth Franklin was voted “Best Established Visual Artist” by readers of Creative Loafing in 2014. Anna Jensen’s work has been commissioned by the Plaza Hotel in New York. Both artists have exhibited on the two sides of the Atlantic.

Kosmo Vinyl, one-time manager of The Clash, has been exhibiting the world over, including at Shawn Vinson’s Different Trains Gallery in Decatur. Vinyl has also been co-conspirator with Harper on a number of projects. He produced Drivin N Cryin’s 1997 self-titled album, released on Harper’s Casino Music label, recently remastered, retitled and re-released as Too Late to Turn Back Now. Perhaps it is Vinyl’s collaboration with Athens musician and artist Jack Logan that brings this party full-circle. Logan created the comic book that accompanied Doug, the second album by Harper’s first band, The Coolies. It was Logan’s clay figure Frank, from his album Bulk, which first inspired therealfranktee.

He explains. “He Logan made these little yellow clay figurines for his album Bulk. I have one. After collecting all types of art for 30 years or more, I started taking photos of Frank. Then I made stencils of him. Then drawings. After that, I started making the posters for Clay’s shows at Avondale Towne Cinema. Since then, I have become obsessed.

“The main reason I did Drivin N Cryin’s new album cover is because Clay has a lot of my stuff hanging in his house and Kevn saw it. It seems Kevn and I rode on the same spaceship at some point in 1985.

Tee describes his work as “fun. Really, it’s whatever makes me happy. I’m not sure if it fits in or not but it’s colorful, fun and open.” That attitude is why the flower has become so much a part of his paintings. “I thought it just made everything happy.

“One more thing about the flower,” he adds. “My ant was Japanese and barely spoke English. She adopted me as a child when i was getting off drugs. Before she died, she painted a water color for me. It was a red poppy so that’s the flower I paint. She was a saint. If we could all have grace and mercy like her, traffic wouldn’t be so bad in this town.”

“I get a lot of messages from deserving artists and musicians asking how they can book 378,” Tee notes. “I would love to hand the keys over to these people and let them man their own shows and create their own space for one or two weeks at a time. These are just ideas. Right now things are just moving, and I’m willing to see where it goes.I really don't know what this place is going to be. I am riddled with anxiety but that is life. I have hopes that artists of all types will have a chance to use the space, make some money from their art and bring some love to the community.”"
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  string(7080) "If you were taking in the sensory overload that was __Clay Harper__ hosting his Tuesday nights in May residency at the Avondale Town Cinema last year, you will recall each night had it’s own series of art work promoting the music, art and social discourse.

The graphics, somewhat surrealist interpretations of the familiar juxtaposed with a red flower, were the work of therealfranktee, an otherwise unknown Atlanta artist, whose work is as comforting as it can be jarring.

__Therealfranktee__ has come a long way since those Tuesday nights twelve months ago when Harper was previewing songs from his then about to be released album, ''Bleak Beauty. ''Indeed, Harper’s return to the stage proved to be a springboard for the prolific artist, who creates about five new works a week, launching his popularity into the stratosphere usually inhabited by the space-suited astronaut so often a cornerstone of his artwork.

The artist has taken his fifteen minutes and run with them. Tonight, May 2, he opens __378__, a new art gallery on Clifton Road, around the corner from the __[http://www.fellinisatlanta.com|Fellini's Pizza]__ on [https://www.google.com/maps/place/McLendon Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30307/@33.764844,-84.3351946,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x88f506b7de234a03:0x45446e9841732149!8m2!3d33.764844!4d-84.3330059|McLendon Avenue] in Candler Park.

Tonight’s opening will feature works by Tee, along with those of two other Atlanta-based artists, __[https://annajensenart.com/home.html|Anna Jensen]__ and __[http://www.ruthfranklin.com|Ruth Franklin]__. Pieces from a series of postcard exchanges between artists __[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Logan|Jack Logan]__ and __[https://kosmovinyl.com|Kosmo Vinyl]__ will also be on display.

The gallery will work as a pop-up space whenever the artists open the doors, with notices posted on Instagram and Facebook: @therealfranktee. Tonight’s opening promises to be something more than just an art exhibit. Music for the evening will be provided by __[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevn_Kinney|Kevn Kinney]__ and Friends. Kinney’s performance is not without reason. One of therealfranktee’s astronauts, holding a red flower, appears on the cover of ''Live The Love Beautiful'', __[https://www.drivinncryin.com|Drivin N Cryin]__’s new album, to be released June 21. It was through Harper that Kinney decided DNC should use Tee’s art for the album, the various components he provided incorporated in the package by art director __Susan Archie__ at the __[http://www.worldofanarchie.com|World of AnArchie]__. Archie, a three-time Grammy winner, also designed Harper’s ''Bleak Beauty'', the album that prompted him to organize last year’s successful Tuesday nights in May.

If such artistic incestuous isn’t enough for you, it was Harper who urged therealfranktee to open 378, reason enough for Harper to also be performing tonight.

Tee says the purpose of the gallery is “evolving,” but that his main hope is to provide a place for “local artists and musicians who need a space for a week or two, and to provide it to them if they are able to cover the operating expenses only while they are there.”

The artist/gallery operator says his art “will most likely always be represented, unless someone wants to take it down for their show.” Tee “encourages artists to reach out to book space to make sure the it gets used. The main goal of 378 is to help lift and build artists and musicians of all kinds,” he says. “I don’t have a plan. It’s just seeing where and how it evolves."

Tonight, he explains, “the artists will keep all proceeds from their sales. If money is donated for refreshments or at the door, after operating expenses are covered, those proceeds will be donated to a charity.”

Tee says that hopefully, once 378 is hosting pop-ups on a regular basis, more  I have a few ideas for  we have a few ideas as to what charity or school we will give the proceeds to after expenses.

The artists exhibiting at the opening were chosen because “they are who are in my life at the moment.” Tee moves in impressive circles. Ruth Franklin was voted “Best Established Visual Artist” by readers of ''Creative Loafing ''in 2014. Anna Jensen’s work has been commissioned by the Plaza Hotel in New York. Both artists have exhibited on the two sides of the Atlantic.

Kosmo Vinyl, one-time manager of The Clash, has been exhibiting the world over, including at Shawn Vinson’s __[https://www.differenttrainsgallery.com|Different Trains Gallery]__ in Decatur. Vinyl has also been co-conspirator with Harper on a number of projects. He produced Drivin N Cryin’s 1997 self-titled album, released on Harper’s Casino Music label, recently remastered, retitled and re-released as ''Too Late to Turn Back Now''. Perhaps it is Vinyl’s collaboration with Athens musician and artist Jack Logan that brings this party full-circle. Logan created the comic book that accompanied ''Doug'', the second album by Harper’s first band,'' The Coolies. ''It was Logan’s clay figure Frank, from his album ''[https://aquariumdrunkard.com/2018/01/22/shrunken-head-an-oral-history-of-jack-logans-bulk/|Bulk]'', which first inspired therealfranktee.

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“The main reason I did Drivin N Cryin’s new album cover is because Clay has a lot of my stuff hanging in his house and Kevn saw it. It seems Kevn and I rode on the same spaceship at some point in 1985.

Tee describes his work as “fun. Really, it’s whatever makes me happy. I’m not sure if it fits in or not but it’s colorful, fun and open.” That attitude is why the flower has become so much a part of his paintings. “I thought it just made everything happy.

“One more thing about the flower,” he adds. “My ant was Japanese and barely spoke English. She adopted me as a child when i was getting off drugs. Before she died, she painted a water color for me. It was a red poppy so that’s the flower I paint. She was a saint. If we could all have grace and mercy like her, traffic wouldn’t be so bad in this town.”

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  string(7085) " IMG 9544  2019-05-02T13:59:11+00:00 IMG_9544.JPG   I think this is a really good article.You make this information interesting...Thanks
[https://games.lol/|PC Games Download]  The new gallery in Candler Park is a ‘pop-up shop’ for local artists; Kevn Kinney and Clay Harper provide the soundtrack for tonight's opening 17056  2019-05-02T13:58:42+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: 378 — Art for art’s sake tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2019-05-02T13:58:42+00:00  If you were taking in the sensory overload that was Clay Harper hosting his Tuesday nights in May residency at the Avondale Town Cinema last year, you will recall each night had it’s own series of art work promoting the music, art and social discourse.

The graphics, somewhat surrealist interpretations of the familiar juxtaposed with a red flower, were the work of therealfranktee, an otherwise unknown Atlanta artist, whose work is as comforting as it can be jarring.

Therealfranktee has come a long way since those Tuesday nights twelve months ago when Harper was previewing songs from his then about to be released album, Bleak Beauty. Indeed, Harper’s return to the stage proved to be a springboard for the prolific artist, who creates about five new works a week, launching his popularity into the stratosphere usually inhabited by the space-suited astronaut so often a cornerstone of his artwork.

The artist has taken his fifteen minutes and run with them. Tonight, May 2, he opens 378, a new art gallery on Clifton Road, around the corner from the Fellini's Pizza on McLendon Avenue in Candler Park.

Tonight’s opening will feature works by Tee, along with those of two other Atlanta-based artists, Anna Jensen and Ruth Franklin. Pieces from a series of postcard exchanges between artists Jack Logan and Kosmo Vinyl will also be on display.

The gallery will work as a pop-up space whenever the artists open the doors, with notices posted on Instagram and Facebook: @therealfranktee. Tonight’s opening promises to be something more than just an art exhibit. Music for the evening will be provided by Kevn Kinney and Friends. Kinney’s performance is not without reason. One of therealfranktee’s astronauts, holding a red flower, appears on the cover of Live The Love Beautiful, Drivin N Cryin’s new album, to be released June 21. It was through Harper that Kinney decided DNC should use Tee’s art for the album, the various components he provided incorporated in the package by art director Susan Archie at the World of AnArchie. Archie, a three-time Grammy winner, also designed Harper’s Bleak Beauty, the album that prompted him to organize last year’s successful Tuesday nights in May.

If such artistic incestuous isn’t enough for you, it was Harper who urged therealfranktee to open 378, reason enough for Harper to also be performing tonight.

Tee says the purpose of the gallery is “evolving,” but that his main hope is to provide a place for “local artists and musicians who need a space for a week or two, and to provide it to them if they are able to cover the operating expenses only while they are there.”

The artist/gallery operator says his art “will most likely always be represented, unless someone wants to take it down for their show.” Tee “encourages artists to reach out to book space to make sure the it gets used. The main goal of 378 is to help lift and build artists and musicians of all kinds,” he says. “I don’t have a plan. It’s just seeing where and how it evolves."

Tonight, he explains, “the artists will keep all proceeds from their sales. If money is donated for refreshments or at the door, after operating expenses are covered, those proceeds will be donated to a charity.”

Tee says that hopefully, once 378 is hosting pop-ups on a regular basis, more  I have a few ideas for  we have a few ideas as to what charity or school we will give the proceeds to after expenses.

The artists exhibiting at the opening were chosen because “they are who are in my life at the moment.” Tee moves in impressive circles. Ruth Franklin was voted “Best Established Visual Artist” by readers of Creative Loafing in 2014. Anna Jensen’s work has been commissioned by the Plaza Hotel in New York. Both artists have exhibited on the two sides of the Atlantic.

Kosmo Vinyl, one-time manager of The Clash, has been exhibiting the world over, including at Shawn Vinson’s Different Trains Gallery in Decatur. Vinyl has also been co-conspirator with Harper on a number of projects. He produced Drivin N Cryin’s 1997 self-titled album, released on Harper’s Casino Music label, recently remastered, retitled and re-released as Too Late to Turn Back Now. Perhaps it is Vinyl’s collaboration with Athens musician and artist Jack Logan that brings this party full-circle. Logan created the comic book that accompanied Doug, the second album by Harper’s first band, The Coolies. It was Logan’s clay figure Frank, from his album Bulk, which first inspired therealfranktee.

He explains. “He Logan made these little yellow clay figurines for his album Bulk. I have one. After collecting all types of art for 30 years or more, I started taking photos of Frank. Then I made stencils of him. Then drawings. After that, I started making the posters for Clay’s shows at Avondale Towne Cinema. Since then, I have become obsessed.

“The main reason I did Drivin N Cryin’s new album cover is because Clay has a lot of my stuff hanging in his house and Kevn saw it. It seems Kevn and I rode on the same spaceship at some point in 1985.

Tee describes his work as “fun. Really, it’s whatever makes me happy. I’m not sure if it fits in or not but it’s colorful, fun and open.” That attitude is why the flower has become so much a part of his paintings. “I thought it just made everything happy.

“One more thing about the flower,” he adds. “My ant was Japanese and barely spoke English. She adopted me as a child when i was getting off drugs. Before she died, she painted a water color for me. It was a red poppy so that’s the flower I paint. She was a saint. If we could all have grace and mercy like her, traffic wouldn’t be so bad in this town.”

“I get a lot of messages from deserving artists and musicians asking how they can book 378,” Tee notes. “I would love to hand the keys over to these people and let them man their own shows and create their own space for one or two weeks at a time. These are just ideas. Right now things are just moving, and I’m willing to see where it goes.I really don't know what this place is going to be. I am riddled with anxiety but that is life. I have hopes that artists of all types will have a chance to use the space, make some money from their art and bring some love to the community.”    therealfranktee THAT'S ONE SMALL STEP: Artwork for Drivin N Cryin's new single, "Step By Step," by therealfranktee.                                   HIGH FREQUENCIES: 378 — Art for art’s sake "
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Thursday May 2, 2019 09:58 am EDT
The new gallery in Candler Park is a ‘pop-up shop’ for local artists; Kevn Kinney and Clay Harper provide the soundtrack for tonight's opening | more...
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  string(4663) "Televised sporting events are among the most viewed broadcasts in the nation, complete with crowds of impassioned fans. With so many eyes on the players, it’s common for successful athletes to become household names, many being idolized by the general public. A select few athletes have recognized their level of influence and visibility, using their stature as a platform to create real societal change both on and off the field. The National Center for Civil and Human Rights traveling exhibit Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change, currently in Atlanta, seeks to pay tribute to such individuals and their contributions to social justice.

The National Center for Civil and Human Rights has partnered with ESPN in the creation of the exhibit, with the goal of examining the multiple intersections of human rights and sports throughout time. Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change debuted in Atlanta, but has made its way across the country, finding temporary homes in places like Tampa, Los Angeles, and the ESPN Headquarters in Bristol, Connecticut. The installation was expanded and tweaked at each stop along its journey, purposely finding its way back to Atlanta before the Super Bowl, certainly the biggest sporting event of the year.

“Our goal is to inspire folks who visit to find their voice and to see how sports can play a unique role in creating equity and acceptance,” says Ryan Roemerman, director of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights’ LGBTQ Institute and senior strategist. “People will be able to visit the center and learn more about the civil and human rights movements in general, but also see how sports can play a role in creating change.”

Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change’s return to Atlanta is more than just an attempt to increase its visibility with the those in town for the Super Bowl. The exhibit is as much a celebration of the city and its history of civil rights and social progress as it is of the athletes featured in the exhibit. The fight for justice mirrors Atlanta’s own significance and contribution to the Civil Rights Movement.

“The city of Atlanta is a place where the modern civil rights movement was born and that is something that we pride ourselves on,” Roemerman says. “The city understands that the fight for civil rights started here but it’s not over. It’s far from over. A lot of folks think of the Civil and Human rights movements through marches and things like that, and that is true, but I think the exhibit helps people understand that YOU can fight for civil and human rights and equity for all through a variety of platforms. We see that now more than ever.”

Legendary athletes Muhammad Ali, Jackie Robinson, and Billie Jean King, are some of those honored in the exhibit for their roles in advancing desegregation and minimizing gender disparity, but some contemporary sports personalities are given a spotlight as well. Bronze medalist fencer Ibtihaj Muhammad, the first Muslim American woman to compete wearing a hijab as well as the first Muslim American to be awarded an olympic medal, is one of the currently active athletes to receive recognition for her contributions to religious equality. African American women’s tennis player and gold medalist Venus Williams is featured as well for her representing black women as top athletic contenders.

While Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change celebrates the progress we’ve made as a society and the individuals that have done their part in fighting for justice, there’s still a long way to go. The recent harassment of Native American veteran Nathan Phillips during the 2019 Indigenous People’s March is off the court evidence of this. The National Center for Civil and Human Rights hopes that people find inspiration from the exhibit, and that they can continue the legacy started by these competitors.

“There’s always room for growth in terms of equity, even among current players,” Roemerman says. “At our launch the other night, we had Patricio Manuel, who is an American professional boxer and also the first transgender boxer in history to participate in a professional fight. Today you can see people challenging the concept of what someone who wants to play sports should be and has to be. People are really going to respond to that. As more folks use their platform as a way to educate, I can only hope sports becomes a more equitable place for all.”

The exhibit runs through March 29. Admission to the National Center for Civil and Human Rights is free through the end of February in celebration of Black History Month, courtesy of the Coca-Cola Foundation."
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  string(4687) "Televised sporting events are among the most viewed broadcasts in the nation, complete with crowds of impassioned fans. With so many eyes on the players, it’s common for successful athletes to become household names, many being idolized by the general public. A select few athletes have recognized their level of influence and visibility, using their stature as a platform to create real societal change both on and off the field. The National Center for Civil and Human Rights traveling exhibit ''Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change'', currently in Atlanta, seeks to pay tribute to such individuals and their contributions to social justice.

The National Center for Civil and Human Rights has partnered with ESPN in the creation of the exhibit, with the goal of examining the multiple intersections of human rights and sports throughout time. ''Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change'' debuted in Atlanta, but has made its way across the country, finding temporary homes in places like Tampa, Los Angeles, and the ESPN Headquarters in Bristol, Connecticut. The installation was expanded and tweaked at each stop along its journey, purposely finding its way back to Atlanta before the Super Bowl, certainly the biggest sporting event of the year.

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While ''Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change'' celebrates the progress we’ve made as a society and the individuals that have done their part in fighting for justice, there’s still a long way to go. The recent harassment of Native American veteran Nathan Phillips during the 2019 Indigenous People’s March is off the court evidence of this. The National Center for Civil and Human Rights hopes that people find inspiration from the exhibit, and that they can continue the legacy started by these competitors.

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''The exhibit runs through March 29. Admission to the National Center for Civil and Human Rights is free through the end of February in celebration of Black History Month, courtesy of the Coca-Cola Foundation.''"
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  string(5359) " Boxer  2019-02-14T22:20:43+00:00 boxer.jpg   you might want to reconsider the claim about justin smollett.  National Center for Civil and Human Rights team up with ESPN to show how sports can play a role in creating peace and acceptance 13650  2019-02-14T22:16:35+00:00 ‘Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change’ seeks equity for all will.cardwell@gmail.com Will Cardwell Will Cardwell  2019-02-14T22:16:35+00:00  Televised sporting events are among the most viewed broadcasts in the nation, complete with crowds of impassioned fans. With so many eyes on the players, it’s common for successful athletes to become household names, many being idolized by the general public. A select few athletes have recognized their level of influence and visibility, using their stature as a platform to create real societal change both on and off the field. The National Center for Civil and Human Rights traveling exhibit Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change, currently in Atlanta, seeks to pay tribute to such individuals and their contributions to social justice.

The National Center for Civil and Human Rights has partnered with ESPN in the creation of the exhibit, with the goal of examining the multiple intersections of human rights and sports throughout time. Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change debuted in Atlanta, but has made its way across the country, finding temporary homes in places like Tampa, Los Angeles, and the ESPN Headquarters in Bristol, Connecticut. The installation was expanded and tweaked at each stop along its journey, purposely finding its way back to Atlanta before the Super Bowl, certainly the biggest sporting event of the year.

“Our goal is to inspire folks who visit to find their voice and to see how sports can play a unique role in creating equity and acceptance,” says Ryan Roemerman, director of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights’ LGBTQ Institute and senior strategist. “People will be able to visit the center and learn more about the civil and human rights movements in general, but also see how sports can play a role in creating change.”

Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change’s return to Atlanta is more than just an attempt to increase its visibility with the those in town for the Super Bowl. The exhibit is as much a celebration of the city and its history of civil rights and social progress as it is of the athletes featured in the exhibit. The fight for justice mirrors Atlanta’s own significance and contribution to the Civil Rights Movement.

“The city of Atlanta is a place where the modern civil rights movement was born and that is something that we pride ourselves on,” Roemerman says. “The city understands that the fight for civil rights started here but it’s not over. It’s far from over. A lot of folks think of the Civil and Human rights movements through marches and things like that, and that is true, but I think the exhibit helps people understand that YOU can fight for civil and human rights and equity for all through a variety of platforms. We see that now more than ever.”

Legendary athletes Muhammad Ali, Jackie Robinson, and Billie Jean King, are some of those honored in the exhibit for their roles in advancing desegregation and minimizing gender disparity, but some contemporary sports personalities are given a spotlight as well. Bronze medalist fencer Ibtihaj Muhammad, the first Muslim American woman to compete wearing a hijab as well as the first Muslim American to be awarded an olympic medal, is one of the currently active athletes to receive recognition for her contributions to religious equality. African American women’s tennis player and gold medalist Venus Williams is featured as well for her representing black women as top athletic contenders.

While Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change celebrates the progress we’ve made as a society and the individuals that have done their part in fighting for justice, there’s still a long way to go. The recent harassment of Native American veteran Nathan Phillips during the 2019 Indigenous People’s March is off the court evidence of this. The National Center for Civil and Human Rights hopes that people find inspiration from the exhibit, and that they can continue the legacy started by these competitors.

“There’s always room for growth in terms of equity, even among current players,” Roemerman says. “At our launch the other night, we had Patricio Manuel, who is an American professional boxer and also the first transgender boxer in history to participate in a professional fight. Today you can see people challenging the concept of what someone who wants to play sports should be and has to be. People are really going to respond to that. As more folks use their platform as a way to educate, I can only hope sports becomes a more equitable place for all.”

The exhibit runs through March 29. Admission to the National Center for Civil and Human Rights is free through the end of February in celebration of Black History Month, courtesy of the Coca-Cola Foundation.    Courtesy of National Center for Civil and Human Rights PUT ‘EM UP: Transgender boxer Patricio Manuel is one of many athletes who continues to redefine what athletes should be.                                    ‘Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change’ seeks equity for all "
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Thursday February 14, 2019 05:16 pm EST
National Center for Civil and Human Rights team up with ESPN to show how sports can play a role in creating peace and acceptance | more...
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  string(53) "HIGH FREQUENCIES: Activism and the arts at the Bakery"
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  string(6462) "Activism and the arts. Are the two ever really separate? Whether reflecting what is, what could be, or what should be, isn’t art, at its best, a means of communication? A way to arouse emotions and to galvanize viewers to action? Yes, art is a means of escape, but also a contemplation of our current reality.

This Sunday, January 13, We Are March On Georgia, Art + Activism – Women’s Caucus For Art of Georgia, and The Bakery Atlanta will be hosting “The Art of Protest Workshop” at the arts and entertainment venue, 825 Warner Street, to not only discuss art and its role in activism, but for participants to create their own advocacy artwork to be used in the March On to 2020! women’s march in Atlanta on the BeltLine, January 19, and in the 2019 Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade, taking place this year on January 21.

On The Bakery Atlanta’s Facebook page, the workshop, which runs from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., is described as including “a breakdown of what Protest Art means and how to conceptualize it.” At a time in these United States, when protests — and protest art — are needed now perhaps more than at any other time in our nation’s history, the afternoon session promises to be an enlightening and invigorating discussion. Emily M. Getsay, the first queer person and the youngest to be elected as president of the Georgia chapter of the Women’s Caucus for Art, will partner with Gloria Moore, March On to 2020 and March on the Polls coordinator; Anne Rowles, co-founder of the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia (which is affiliated with the National Women’s Caucus for Art); WCAGA Vice President Chelsea Hoag; and Le’Dor Milteer, who will be singing at the March On to 2020; along with other members and constituents of the March and Atlanta resistance movements.

Creative Loafing: How long have you been involved with the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia?

Emily M. Getsay: I joined the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia in 2016. My first show as a member was “Artists Against Modern Day Slavery” at Mammal Gallery. It became an annual exhibition curated by our Art + Activism Committee. This year’s event will take place at the Shambhala Center in Decatur on Saturday, January 19 at 7 p.m. In 2017, I became the chair of our Art + Activism Committee and became the president of WCAGA in January 2018.

Does your interest in working with WCAGA stem from being an artist, or are you more focused on resistance movements?

As a conceptual artist, my work often portrays different elements of resistance and advocacy. My purpose as an artist is not only to mobilize other artists and marginalized voices through my art but also to create work that inspires other artists to do the same. The Caucus brought all of those elements together. As the president, I feel that I’m making the impact I’ve always wanted.

Do you see art as a means of drawing people into resistance and protest movements who might otherwise not give such movements a second thought?

Art serves as a connector. As humans, we are all connected in one way or another. Art serves as a way for people to remember that about ourselves.

Will the workshop focus on art in broader terms? Or is this more about the art of the protest sign in a march or demonstration situation and how to best get your message across?

The workshop will explore examples of my earlier work as an artist and the progression of my work in order to ignite a movement. It will also express the different elements for which attendees can fight as artists while protesting outside of physically participating in rallies and marches.

For example, my piece “Why Aren’t you Fighting?” the workshop background image explores my own space within protesting. We all have a part in the movements because we are all human. If one group is suffering, we are all suffering. Until we all have rights, none of us can stop fighting. This piece explores that space between finding your identity and fighting for others even if you as a person don’t specifically reflect those spaces that need fighting.

An “Art of Protest Exhibition,” in which the work of many of the participants of The Art of Protest workshop will be eligible, is also scheduled to take place, following the March to 2020 Rally on January 19 and the MLK Day parade on January 21. When and where will this exhibit be held?

The Exhibit will follow the March On to 2020 and take place on February 4 for one night only at The Bakery in southwest Atlanta. Those who participate in the “Art of Protest Workshop” will be granted a spot in the show. All artists are able to submit work as long as it is within the limitations. The show will be salon style and free to the public.

A portion of the proceeds from the exhibition will go to supporting the muralists covering up the Squishiepuss work throughout Atlanta. We will also be taking donations for these artists at the door.

Smoking allowed dept. ... The Earl continues to celebrate its twentieth anniversary this weekend. Rightly so. It’s no easy feat for a club booking rock ’n’ roll bands to stay open for any length of time, much less for two decades. When the restaurant/lounge/performance venue first opened its doors at 488 Flat Shoals Avenue, it, along with the Echo Lounge, were pioneers of East Atlanta Village, then just becoming another viable Atlanta nightlife district, especially for those believing Little Five Points was becoming too commercial for their alternative tastes. First booking local and regional bands, owner John Searson started including national touring acts, with the demise of the Echo Lounge. The mix of such bands, along with the restaurant’s sizable and tasty menu, along with Sunday theme brunches, cemented the Earl’s popularity and draw. Of the hundreds of acts to perform on the backroom stage, it’s hard to name a favorite show, but the Batusis with Sylvain Sylvain and Cheetah Chrome will always remain a favorite. The party continues through the weekend, though I wouldn’t say the celebration is capped off until Wednesday, January 16, when Jon Spencer and the Hitmakers and Subsonics take the stage.

Not only for book readers dept. ... The line-up for the Amplify Decatur Music Festival 2019 has been announced. Taking the Decatur Square stage April 13 will be Mavis Staples, Jeff Tweedy (Wilco), Kevn Kinney (Drivin N Cryin), and the Bitteroots."
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This Sunday, January 13, [https://www.facebook.com/wearemarchongeorgia/?tn-str=k*F|We Are March On Georgia], [https://www.facebook.com/art.activism.wcaga/|Art + Activism – Women’s Caucus For Art of Georgia], and [https://thebakeryatlanta.com|The Bakery Atlanta] will be hosting “[https://www.facebook.com/events/357060961774765/|The Art of Protest Workshop]” at the arts and entertainment venue, 825 Warner Street, to not only discuss art and its role in activism, but for participants to create their own advocacy artwork to be used in the March On to 2020! women’s march in Atlanta on the BeltLine, January 19, and in the 2019 Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade, taking place this year on January 21.

On The Bakery Atlanta’s Facebook page, the workshop, which runs from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., is described as including “a breakdown of what Protest Art means and how to conceptualize it.” At a time in these United States, when protests — and protest art — are needed now perhaps more than at any other time in our nation’s history, the afternoon session promises to be an enlightening and invigorating discussion. Emily M. Getsay, the first queer person and the youngest to be elected as president of the Georgia chapter of the Women’s Caucus for Art, will partner with Gloria Moore, March On to 2020 and March on the Polls coordinator; Anne Rowles, co-founder of the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia (which is affiliated with the [https://nationalwca.org/|National Women’s Caucus for Art]); WCAGA Vice President Chelsea Hoag; and Le’Dor Milteer, who will be singing at the March On to 2020; along with other members and constituents of the March and Atlanta resistance movements.

__''Creative Loafing'': How long have you been involved with the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia?__

Emily M. Getsay: I joined the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia in 2016. My first show as a member was “__[http://cp.wabe.org/post/womens-caucus-art-curates-exhibit-human-trafficking|Artists Against Modern Day Slavery]__” at Mammal Gallery. It became an annual exhibition curated by our Art + Activism Committee. This year’s [https://www.facebook.com/events/391257248287185/|event] will take place at the Shambhala Center in Decatur on Saturday, January 19 at 7 p.m. In 2017, I became the chair of our Art + Activism Committee and became the president of WCAGA in January 2018.

__Does your interest in working with WCAGA stem from being an artist, or are you more focused on resistance movements?__

As a conceptual artist, my work often portrays different elements of resistance and advocacy. My purpose as an artist is not only to mobilize other artists and marginalized voices through my art but also to create work that inspires other artists to do the same. The Caucus brought all of those elements together. As the president, I feel that I’m making the impact I’ve always wanted.

__Do you see art as a means of drawing people into resistance and protest movements who might otherwise not give such movements a second thought?__

Art serves as a connector. As humans, we are all connected in one way or another. Art serves as a way for people to remember that about ourselves.

__Will the workshop focus on art in broader terms? Or is this more about the art of the protest sign in a march or demonstration situation and how to best get your message across?__

The workshop will explore examples of my earlier work as an artist and the progression of my work in order to ignite a movement. It will also express the different elements for which attendees can fight as artists while protesting outside of physically participating in rallies and marches.

For example, my piece “Why Aren’t you Fighting?” [[the workshop background image] explores my own space within protesting. We all have a part in the movements because we are all human. If one group is suffering, we are all suffering. Until we all have rights, none of us can stop fighting. This piece explores that space between finding your identity and fighting for others even if you as a person don’t specifically reflect those spaces that need fighting.

__An “Art of Protest Exhibition,” in which the work of many of the participants of The Art of Protest workshop will be eligible, is also scheduled to take place, following the March to 2020 Rally on January 19 and the MLK Day parade on January 21. When and where will this exhibit be held?__

[https://www.facebook.com/events/2228238687445928/|The Exhibit] will follow the March On to 2020 and take place on February 4 for one night only at The Bakery in southwest Atlanta. Those who participate in the “Art of Protest Workshop” will be granted a spot in the show. All artists are able to submit work as long as it is within the limitations. The show will be salon style and free to the public.

A portion of the proceeds from the exhibition will go to supporting the muralists covering up the Squishiepuss work throughout Atlanta. We will also be taking donations for these artists at the door.

__Smoking allowed dept. ...__ __[http://www.badearl.com|The Earl]__ continues to celebrate its __twentieth __anniversary this weekend. Rightly so. It’s no easy feat for a club booking rock ’n’ roll bands to stay open for any length of time, much less for two decades. When the restaurant/lounge/performance venue first opened its doors at 488 Flat Shoals Avenue, it, along with the Echo Lounge, were pioneers of __East Atlanta Village__, then just becoming another viable Atlanta nightlife district, especially for those believing Little Five Points was becoming too commercial for their alternative tastes. First booking local and regional bands, owner __John Searson__ started including national touring acts, with the demise of the Echo Lounge. The mix of such bands, along with the restaurant’s sizable and tasty menu, along with Sunday theme brunches, cemented the Earl’s popularity and draw. Of the hundreds of acts to perform on the backroom stage, it’s hard to name a favorite show, but the __Batusis__ with __Sylvain Sylvain__ and __Cheetah Chrome__ will always remain a favorite. The party continues through the weekend, though I wouldn’t say the celebration is capped off until Wednesday, January 16, when __Jon Spencer and the Hitmakers__ and __Subsonics__ take the stage.

__Not only for book readers dept. ...__ The line-up for the __[https://www.amplifydecatur.org|Amplify Decatur]__ Music Festival 2019 has been announced. Taking the Decatur Square stage April 13 will be __Mavis Staples__, __Jeff Tweedy__ (Wilco), __Kevn Kinney__ (Drivin N Cryin), and the __Bitteroots__."
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  string(6949) " EmGetsay  2019-01-12T22:31:02+00:00 EmGetsay.png     Artist Emily M. Getsay, others, to discuss resistance art 12500  2019-01-17T22:58:00+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: Activism and the arts at the Bakery tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris TONY PARIS Tony Paris 2019-01-17T22:58:00+00:00  Activism and the arts. Are the two ever really separate? Whether reflecting what is, what could be, or what should be, isn’t art, at its best, a means of communication? A way to arouse emotions and to galvanize viewers to action? Yes, art is a means of escape, but also a contemplation of our current reality.

This Sunday, January 13, We Are March On Georgia, Art + Activism – Women’s Caucus For Art of Georgia, and The Bakery Atlanta will be hosting “The Art of Protest Workshop” at the arts and entertainment venue, 825 Warner Street, to not only discuss art and its role in activism, but for participants to create their own advocacy artwork to be used in the March On to 2020! women’s march in Atlanta on the BeltLine, January 19, and in the 2019 Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade, taking place this year on January 21.

On The Bakery Atlanta’s Facebook page, the workshop, which runs from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., is described as including “a breakdown of what Protest Art means and how to conceptualize it.” At a time in these United States, when protests — and protest art — are needed now perhaps more than at any other time in our nation’s history, the afternoon session promises to be an enlightening and invigorating discussion. Emily M. Getsay, the first queer person and the youngest to be elected as president of the Georgia chapter of the Women’s Caucus for Art, will partner with Gloria Moore, March On to 2020 and March on the Polls coordinator; Anne Rowles, co-founder of the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia (which is affiliated with the National Women’s Caucus for Art); WCAGA Vice President Chelsea Hoag; and Le’Dor Milteer, who will be singing at the March On to 2020; along with other members and constituents of the March and Atlanta resistance movements.

Creative Loafing: How long have you been involved with the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia?

Emily M. Getsay: I joined the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia in 2016. My first show as a member was “Artists Against Modern Day Slavery” at Mammal Gallery. It became an annual exhibition curated by our Art + Activism Committee. This year’s event will take place at the Shambhala Center in Decatur on Saturday, January 19 at 7 p.m. In 2017, I became the chair of our Art + Activism Committee and became the president of WCAGA in January 2018.

Does your interest in working with WCAGA stem from being an artist, or are you more focused on resistance movements?

As a conceptual artist, my work often portrays different elements of resistance and advocacy. My purpose as an artist is not only to mobilize other artists and marginalized voices through my art but also to create work that inspires other artists to do the same. The Caucus brought all of those elements together. As the president, I feel that I’m making the impact I’ve always wanted.

Do you see art as a means of drawing people into resistance and protest movements who might otherwise not give such movements a second thought?

Art serves as a connector. As humans, we are all connected in one way or another. Art serves as a way for people to remember that about ourselves.

Will the workshop focus on art in broader terms? Or is this more about the art of the protest sign in a march or demonstration situation and how to best get your message across?

The workshop will explore examples of my earlier work as an artist and the progression of my work in order to ignite a movement. It will also express the different elements for which attendees can fight as artists while protesting outside of physically participating in rallies and marches.

For example, my piece “Why Aren’t you Fighting?” the workshop background image explores my own space within protesting. We all have a part in the movements because we are all human. If one group is suffering, we are all suffering. Until we all have rights, none of us can stop fighting. This piece explores that space between finding your identity and fighting for others even if you as a person don’t specifically reflect those spaces that need fighting.

An “Art of Protest Exhibition,” in which the work of many of the participants of The Art of Protest workshop will be eligible, is also scheduled to take place, following the March to 2020 Rally on January 19 and the MLK Day parade on January 21. When and where will this exhibit be held?

The Exhibit will follow the March On to 2020 and take place on February 4 for one night only at The Bakery in southwest Atlanta. Those who participate in the “Art of Protest Workshop” will be granted a spot in the show. All artists are able to submit work as long as it is within the limitations. The show will be salon style and free to the public.

A portion of the proceeds from the exhibition will go to supporting the muralists covering up the Squishiepuss work throughout Atlanta. We will also be taking donations for these artists at the door.

Smoking allowed dept. ... The Earl continues to celebrate its twentieth anniversary this weekend. Rightly so. It’s no easy feat for a club booking rock ’n’ roll bands to stay open for any length of time, much less for two decades. When the restaurant/lounge/performance venue first opened its doors at 488 Flat Shoals Avenue, it, along with the Echo Lounge, were pioneers of East Atlanta Village, then just becoming another viable Atlanta nightlife district, especially for those believing Little Five Points was becoming too commercial for their alternative tastes. First booking local and regional bands, owner John Searson started including national touring acts, with the demise of the Echo Lounge. The mix of such bands, along with the restaurant’s sizable and tasty menu, along with Sunday theme brunches, cemented the Earl’s popularity and draw. Of the hundreds of acts to perform on the backroom stage, it’s hard to name a favorite show, but the Batusis with Sylvain Sylvain and Cheetah Chrome will always remain a favorite. The party continues through the weekend, though I wouldn’t say the celebration is capped off until Wednesday, January 16, when Jon Spencer and the Hitmakers and Subsonics take the stage.

Not only for book readers dept. ... The line-up for the Amplify Decatur Music Festival 2019 has been announced. Taking the Decatur Square stage April 13 will be Mavis Staples, Jeff Tweedy (Wilco), Kevn Kinney (Drivin N Cryin), and the Bitteroots.    COURTESY OF THE ARTIST WHY AREN’T YOU FIGHTING?: Lustre print by Emily M. Getsay, 2017, 4 ft. X 3 ft.                                   HIGH FREQUENCIES: Activism and the arts at the Bakery "
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Article

Thursday January 17, 2019 05:58 pm EST
Artist Emily M. Getsay, others, to discuss resistance art | more...
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Article

Thursday January 10, 2019 10:19 am EST
Free bop trio livens up Castleberry Hill Art Stroll on a cold evening | more...
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  string(148) "Days before the opening of Squishieland, a would-be art gallery and event space by Atlanta-based artist Ray Geier, texts and tweets of abuse surface"
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  string(148) "Days before the opening of Squishieland, a would-be art gallery and event space by Atlanta-based artist Ray Geier, texts and tweets of abuse surface"
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  string(6846) "You’ve probably seen the pink, octopus-like French bulldog creature painted on buildings all over town. You may even be a fan. But what if the creator of that cute squishy face turned out to be concealing an unexpectedly dark persona? That’s what folks are currently asking about Ray Geier, the artist also known as Squishiepuss, after extremely alarming sexual harassment allegations against him have surfaced.

Geier popped up in the Atlanta art scene around 2012 and quickly made a name for himself with his stylized cartoons of a French bulldog with an octopus body, a signature character that eventually gathered an enthusiastic following. On his website, Geier sold everything from enameled pins to skateboards to handpainted portraits — most featuring the bulldog’s memorable pink coat and pop eyes. Most recently, Geier planned to open a free art gallery and event space  to be called Squishieland, set to open January 12.

Late Thursday evening, January 3, on Facebook, a flood of allegations poured in, many echoing this one from an Atlanta Facebook user: "After hearing from dozens of women that this Ray Fella thinks it's funny to joke about rape and aids sic, be super abusive to women. Sleep on this artist, his gallery, his events. There are more talented artists in our city. I'm not one to jump on the call-out culture but you just don't have literally dozens of women come forward over the course of a few hours over misunderstandings. Ray, your behavior isn't acceptable.”



The allegations, which go as far as alleged pedophilia, include screenshots of Geier’s revenge porn, targeting those who rejected him sexually. These disturbing screenshots were made public by Atlanta artist and alleged victim Aliya Smith, who, when asked why she felt it important to go public, forwarded Creative Loafing this statement.

“This has been whispered around Atlanta, especially though the art scene, and especially among women, for years,” says Smith, who claims she tried to warn people about her experiences with Geier over a year ago. “I’d had a couple of uncomfortable interactions with him by that point and he made sexual comments about photos of mine that made me deeply uncomfortable."

As it turned out, Smith's experience was tame in comparison with that of others who began to speak out.

“On NYE 2018, Kayleen Scott posted some screenshots from Geier’s old Twitter account, “rayspitsongirls,” to her Instagram story and texted them to me out of anger after finding them,” Smith’s statement continues. “We both decided it was time to stop whispering and start speaking, yelling. A few days later, I posted them to my IG story. I posted anonymous accounts I had received along with my own because I wanted Geier to stop harassing people. I didn’t know how deep it went. In just 24 hours I received hundreds of messages, about 40 or so of which were claims of alleged harassment, assault, revenge porn, as well as talk of underage girls. Then Kayleen and I thought about the gallery he was going to open and we got so scared about the vulnerable young women it could bring in. When Kayleen started warning people about this, it was purely out of protection. When we posted the screenshots this week, it was out of the same motive. The city shouldn’t support anything given the claims we’ve received. And it seems like the city agrees.

“We’ve of course received backlash from people who think this is a conspiracy or a trend of some sort," added Smith, "but the overwhelming support for victims has been amazing.”

Atlanta artist and Facet Gallery owner, Peter Ferrari, also posted concerns involving Geier, just days before Geier was set to open a new retail, event, and art gallery in Grant Park’s latest development, The Beacon Atlanta. When CL reached out to Ferrari regarding the timing of his posts, he confirmed Smith’s statement and added his own take on Geier’s place in Atlanta’s art community, particularly regarding Kayleen Scott, who is also Ferrari’s girlfriend.

“I’ve avoided and actively ignored Ray for several years now. He said really inappropriate things to my girlfriend (artist Kayleen Scott), so I knew he was a creep and possibly worse. It was something shared privately, but often ignored. A friend sent me his video regarding Squishieland. I was immediately skeptical, as it seemed tailor-made to give him access to impressionable artists looking to break into the scene. I made a post on my story about artists being skeptical of those claiming to “support the arts” while simultaneously creeping on young women. I did not name Ray in the post. Afterwards I was contacted by a woman who immediately knew who I was referring to. She told me about his old twitter handle, @rayspitsongirls since deleted and I Googled it. We saw all the tweets. My girlfriend was furious. It brought back years of anger and trauma that she had pushed down. She posted the tweets to her private Instagram and shared her experiences with Ray. Another woman asked if she could share on her public page and see if others had the same experience. Once she did, she was inundated with dozens of accounts from women alleging inappropriate behavior from Ray. From there, it took off, resulting in his outing as an alleged serial mistreater of women and girls in the arts community. The timing was not a coincidence. His opening/gallery brought back trauma and grief to the victims that could not be suppressed. There was a risk to our community that couldn’t be ignored any longer,” Ferrari concluded.

Regardless of who leaked the first tweet, the furor has leveled Geier’s standing and created a significant threat to his career. When contacted by Creative Loafing for a comment on Friday, January 4, Geier responded, "I'm still trying to figure out between ignoring it or making a video / podcast addressing it. so that nothing gets misconstrued. ... That's why I haven't commented, yet. I'm listening." While not getting back to CL directly, Geier finally took to social media Saturday morning January 5, posting a video saying, “I’m ashamed and embarrassed.” More than 500 commenters reacted negatively, agreeing that the video was hardly a remorseful apology.

Within hours, the video and the artist’s social media presence was scrubbed from the internet. Businesses across Atlanta, such as Home Grown GA and Hodgepodge Coffeehouse, were quick to remove all traces of Squishiepuss art.

The Beacon Atlanta issued a statement saying they’ve ended their lease agreement with Geier and he will no longer be a tenant. Click here to read the full statement by The Beacon Atlanta.

Editor's note: This article has been edited since its original publication to more accurately report the story. "
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Geier popped up in the Atlanta art scene around 2012 and quickly made a name for himself with his stylized cartoons of a French bulldog with an octopus body, a signature character that eventually gathered an enthusiastic following. On his website, Geier sold everything from enameled pins to skateboards to handpainted portraits — most featuring the bulldog’s memorable pink coat and pop eyes. Most recently, Geier planned to open a free art gallery and event space  to be called Squishieland, set to open January 12.

Late Thursday evening, January 3, on Facebook, a flood of allegations poured in, many echoing this one from an Atlanta Facebook user: "After hearing from dozens of women that this Ray Fella thinks it's funny to joke about rape and aids [[sic], be super abusive to women. Sleep on this artist, his gallery, his events. There are more talented artists in our city. I'm not one to jump on the call-out culture but you just don't have literally dozens of women come forward over the course of a few hours over misunderstandings. Ray, your behavior isn't acceptable.”

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The allegations, which go as far as alleged pedophilia, include screenshots of Geier’s revenge porn, targeting those who rejected him sexually. [https://www.icloud.com/photos/?fbclid=IwAR3aMLEymix96Gp5-mSw3wCUEJoLT4sREO8B0oEKXEpmazo1UszicqfQfnc#05N5V4QomBsGMrNelrXcK5thQ?fbclid=IwAR3b_UHIDYUlnk9qn1seFsqPCoyU4F9RIpxcqiyquyuhN8vN1V9oLaETDgs|These disturbing screenshots ]were made public by Atlanta artist and alleged victim Aliya Smith, who, when asked why she felt it important to go public, forwarded ''Creative Loafing'' this statement.

“This has been whispered around Atlanta, especially though the art scene, and especially among women, for years,” says Smith, who claims she tried to warn people about her experiences with Geier over a year ago. “I’d had a couple of uncomfortable interactions with him by that point and he made sexual comments about photos of mine that made me deeply uncomfortable."

As it turned out, Smith's experience was tame in comparison with that of others who began to speak out.

“On NYE 2018, [[Kayleen] Scott posted some screenshots from Geier’s old Twitter account, “rayspitsongirls,” to her Instagram story and texted them to me out of anger after finding them,” Smith’s statement continues. “We both decided it was time to stop whispering and start speaking, yelling. A few days later, I posted them to my IG story. I posted anonymous accounts I had received along with my own because I wanted [[Geier] to stop harassing people. I didn’t know how deep it went. In just 24 hours I received hundreds of messages, about 40 or so of which were claims of [[alleged] harassment, assault, revenge porn, as well as talk of underage girls. Then Kayleen and I thought about the gallery he was going to open and we got so scared about the vulnerable young women it could bring in. When Kayleen started warning people about this, it was purely out of protection. When we [[posted the screenshots] this week, it was out of the same motive. The city shouldn’t support anything [[given] the claims we’ve received. And it seems like the city agrees.

“We’ve of course received backlash from people who think this is a conspiracy or a trend of some sort," added Smith, "but the overwhelming support for victims has been amazing.”

Atlanta artist and Facet Gallery owner, Peter Ferrari, also posted concerns involving Geier, just days before Geier was set to open a new retail, event, and art gallery in Grant Park’s latest development, The Beacon Atlanta. When ''CL'' reached out to Ferrari regarding the timing of his posts, he confirmed Smith’s statement and added his own take on Geier’s place in Atlanta’s art community, particularly regarding Kayleen Scott, who is also Ferrari’s girlfriend.

“I’ve avoided and actively ignored Ray for several years now. He said really inappropriate things to my girlfriend (artist Kayleen Scott), so I knew he was a creep and possibly worse. It was something shared privately, but often ignored. A friend sent me his video regarding Squishieland. I was immediately skeptical, as it seemed tailor-made to give him access to impressionable artists looking to break into the scene. I made a post on my story about artists being skeptical of those claiming to “support the arts” while simultaneously creeping on young women. I did not name Ray in the post. Afterwards I was contacted by a woman who immediately knew who I was referring to. She told me about his old twitter handle, @rayspitsongirls [[since deleted] and I Googled it. We saw all the tweets. My girlfriend was furious. It brought back years of anger and trauma that she had pushed down. She posted the tweets to her private Instagram and shared her experiences with Ray. Another woman asked if she could share on her public page and see if others had the same experience. Once she did, she was inundated with dozens of accounts from women alleging inappropriate behavior from Ray. From there, it took off, resulting in his outing as an [[alleged] serial mistreater of women and girls in the arts community. The timing was not a coincidence. His opening/gallery brought back trauma and grief to the victims that could not be suppressed. There was a risk to our community that couldn’t be ignored any longer,” Ferrari concluded.

Regardless of who leaked the first tweet, the furor has leveled Geier’s standing and created a significant threat to his career. When contacted by ''Creative Loafing'' for a comment on Friday, January 4, Geier responded, "I'm still trying to figure out between ignoring it or making a video / podcast addressing it. so that nothing gets misconstrued. ... That's why I haven't commented, yet. I'm listening." While not getting back to ''CL'' directly, Geier finally took to social media Saturday morning [[January 5], posting a video saying, “I’m ashamed and embarrassed.” More than 500 commenters reacted negatively, agreeing that the video was hardly a remorseful apology.

Within hours, the video and the artist’s social media presence was scrubbed from the internet. Businesses across Atlanta, such as Home Grown GA and Hodgepodge Coffeehouse, were quick to remove all traces of Squishiepuss art.

The Beacon Atlanta issued a statement saying they’ve ended their lease agreement with Geier and he will no longer be a tenant. Click [https://www.facebook.com/402836490189549/posts/553286755144521/|here] to read the full statement by The Beacon Atlanta.

''Editor's note: This article has been edited since its original publication to more accurately report the story.'' "
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  string(18724) " Squishiepuss2  2019-01-06T02:20:15+00:00 Squishiepuss2.png   Art crap, take-down speed would impress a PoMo’s post warhol. Hope they all heal. Interesting story, but the last paragraph of the article just trails off and feels disjointed. This is more of a comment on the writing than the story. Could be better. Thanks for talking about Ferrari’s role in this. He started this, led the charge, got this guys life destroyed judge jury executioner style, and then talked about stealing the idea on Facebook with friends. From what I see, this guy deserved a fair trial because a lot of this is fishy, but unfortunately he’s completely gone. I’ve also since heard some other guy competitors have talked about Peter [[allegedly — ''ed.''] doing something similar to them. I don't understand a word of this article as it's written in slang. There are so many gaps, so many unexplained statements that assume the reader already has vast knowledge of the Atlanta "Art" Scene (if you can call what appears to be one graffiti character 'art'). I guess you have to be young and 'hip' to get it. Now that the ball is rolling. 
Who’s going to speak out about the harassment, abuse, & bullying of free art Atlanta artists? Sadly being done by other free art artists. Woman telling other women that they don’t make enough art. Don’t live ITP. Don’t make enough drops. Turning art into burns dissing the original artist. For no reason than to be mean. It’s sad. That it’s continued for 5+ years and no one wants to talk about it. Ray is a complete douche and unoriginal artist, and I’m glad it all eventually came crashing down on him, but damn this is a really poorly written article. Do they still emphasize writing classes for journalists? For one, the end of the article just trails off Yea. I've been following Peter Ferari for a little while now and he comes off as the self righteous, self proclaimed atlanta art police. 

In the made up story in my head Peter decided to take Ray out after seeing him about to open up his own space. Peter, knowing he could use ray's inappropriate behavior to crush him. He would have used his girlfriend's experience, but that would have lead directly back to him, so they "used" that Aliya artist to get the campaign out. 

Just my guess as to how it went down. Ray's shown himself to be a horrible person who deserves to be run out of town, and potentially prosecuted. I feel terrible for all his victims and wish them the best in their healing processes.

That said: holy hell this "article" is a PoS. Typos, random bad links, an overall tone of a gossipy blog…what happened to the Loaf?! This is a serious topic that deserves serious journalism, not this crap. As of 4 am Saturday, there were over 500 comments, almost all about what a pathetic excuse of an apology it was. It didn't apologize for anything and he tried to use mental illness as an excuse. 

As an aside, where's the end of the article? It reads like a BuzzFeed article. "Here's our headline but this is basically all stuff somebody else wrote with us summing up things - inaccurately." 

Woohoo. My first-ever comment. I hope it is "overall" dope. Did you read the story? You're facts are not correct. To begin with,  I didnt leak anything and I certainly didn't "start this". This was started decades ago when Ray decided to mistreat and harass women. Your post is ridiculous. The people of Atlanta saw what was shared by his VICTIMS and took action. I amplified their message as many others have. I would also ask that you email me screenshots of this supposed conversation on FB where i "talked about stealing the idea" (what idea?) because that never happened. Please back up your anonymous claims about me and my behavior. My email is plfpaint@gmail.com and I will be sure to check back in on this thread to let folks know if you've sent them. Guy is a total creep. He hit me up in my dms a year ago and said "I'm hot because I look like a little boy". May he rot. Don't trust Peter Ferrari. This article is very poorly written. The evidence presented is anonymous and obviously doctored. There are two stories being smashed together on the third screenshot. I'm not trying to say the man is innocent or guilty, I'm just trying to say that this is a terrible example of journalism. Wow CL. God forbid you could just believe women and advocate for victims! Congratulations on distracting and distorting on the actual issue (a serial abuser) with remedial bullshit. Right?! Did they hire a middle schooler to writer this piece? The writing is so juvenile, including a handful of egregious grammatical errors. You're better than this Creative Loafing! This guy sounds like a total creep. Not advocating for him in any way. But the last paragraph in this article is ridiculous: "His popularity was always a bit in question by the art community, as it never varied, literally. He painted the same Squishiepuss character over and over."

Many of history's greatest artists' art "never varied, literally". They painted the same "character" or motif over and over and over and over again. To denigrate an artist because of this is nuts. Now, all the other creepy, abusive stuff is another story... Well, at least your comment has a beginning, middle, and ending! All these accusations, and no actual screens of [alleged] messages he is said to of sent to multiple victims. It’s only innocent when proven guilty when it’s suits you I guess. This shit reeks double standards. This article is garbage. How dare you question the motives of a man (Ferrari) who is being the type of ally women need and want? There are so many allegations against Geier, that even if Ferrari had ulterior motives in amplifying the victims' voices, IT WOULDNT MATTER. 

As a woman, this writer should re-examine her own motives in lending any type of credence to "gossip like conspiracy theories" in an article that should've remained focused on this piece of filth that degraded, harassed, and assaulted so many women.

I didn't realize CL was such a filthy rag. This writer owes Geier's victims a huge apology. And maybe should focus on facts and the context of her stories instead of shouting out her "overall dope" friends in a "news" article. It's only January 5 and Ema Carr is already a front runner for the Worst Writing of the Year award. I know CL went through crazy layoffs, but didn't you keep at least one true editor on staff?! Saying it reads like a Buzzfeed article is insulting to Buzzfeed. At least they don't pretend to be good writers. Peter Ferrari did what any civic minded, compassionate individual would’ve done. Don’t marginalize his endeavors because of his position in the arts community. Quit supporting abusive men and shaming victims. I’ve been aware of Ray’s [[alleged — ''ed.''] perversity for years, but because of victim shamers the message fell on deaf ears. You wanna continue to buy crap recycled talentless art from a [[alleged — ''ed.''] rapist? Go ahead, his website is still active. Also, take your shit to another city skin with you favorite [[alleged — ''ed.''] pedophilic joke “artist” and quit harassing decent people who are standing up for the downtrodden and mistreated women of Atlanta. Fuck ray and anyone who supports him. Fuck rape culture. You naysayers keep asking for proof but I say the tweets are enough. If you can’t accept that perhaps victims don’t want to fully embrace the media whirlwind at their own expense, keep sucking pink tentacle. You make me sick and should be ashamed of yourself, though we all know that won’t happen, since without “ray” you can’t spell RAYPIST How does digging up tweets from 8+ years ago make that half naked girl on Instagram a victim of anything? I have yet to see any proof of actual [[or alleged — ''ed.''] assault/rape/etc from “Ray”. While I appreciate this story getting coverage, I think its disjointedness deters away from the actual stories and trauma these women experienced.  The conspiracy that this was a witch hunt orchestrated by Peter is absurd (who is a lovely human, btw). To suggest this story is about two "competing" galleries diminishes the real pain and abuse women experienced over the span of a decade (and probably more). Thank you Aliya and Kayleen for getting this conversation started, and thank you to all the brave women who came forward with their stories. I hope CL will publish a more thoughtful re-write of this soon. So wait you're saying this is correct, you knew about it years ago, and JUST NOW decided to bring it all to the surface, right before he opened his gallery that would have directly competed with yours? I don't think any of the things he said were right, I just think your part in this is just as wrong because it doesn't come from the right place. Not that it matters anymore. You took part by not saying something right away but waiting until it was convenient for you to dig up those tweets from a decade ago. He said horrible things, but from reading this it seems to me you did something horrible. This is the level of "news" we get now! Pulling stuff off of social media and re-cycling hearsay that is three or four levels deep? Did the author reach out to the person being accused to at least get their point of view? This article is as irresponsible as those posting the hate and vitriol on social media. I would argue it is even more irresponsible, since the media [[barely] carries with it more of semblance of fact. 

I'm not arguing for either side of this issue but I do think this reeks of the bully mentality prevalent today. The court of public opinion has tried and convicted someone and ruined their life totally. Being a creepy asshole isn't a crime. If crimes have been committed, then report to the authorities and handle it like adults instead of spoiled children. Yes, Ray Geier was contacted by the author for a statement. His response was, "I'm still trying to figure out between ignoring it or making a video / podcast addressing it. so that nothing gets misconstrued. ... That's why I haven't commented, yet. I'm listening." Geier's response was the video referenced in the story. The legally actionable comments hosted here and the questionable dissemination by Creative Loafing for slander and defamation sure are troubling.  People and news organizations should exercise caution before broadcasting such accusations without evidence to support such claims represented here. Emma Carr does poor reporting. I see this article has changed drastically since I first read it two weeks ago. There was an excerpt that said all his art were “the same, literally.” Nice bias opinion there. He’s a horrible person but shame on the writer for not being objective. The art isn’t literally the same. If you google it, you’ll clearly see multiple variances. Again, not saying the artist is a good person, but when you are a journalist, you have to write about facts and leave your opinions out. Glad the writer edited that part out. Also, a great journalist does not need days to write a good article. If it’s breaking, they need to be able to produce high quality news on the spot. CL please hire better writers. Thank you for your comments and concerns. You are correct. squishie squishiepuss squishypuss puss squi squish skwishy squishipuss Days before the opening of Squishieland, a would-be art gallery and event space by Atlanta-based artist Ray Geier, texts and tweets of abuse surface 12320  2019-01-05T21:04:25+00:00 The Sun Sets on Squishiepuss tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Ema Carr Ema Carr 2019-01-05T21:04:25+00:00  You’ve probably seen the pink, octopus-like French bulldog creature painted on buildings all over town. You may even be a fan. But what if the creator of that cute squishy face turned out to be concealing an unexpectedly dark persona? That’s what folks are currently asking about Ray Geier, the artist also known as Squishiepuss, after extremely alarming sexual harassment allegations against him have surfaced.

Geier popped up in the Atlanta art scene around 2012 and quickly made a name for himself with his stylized cartoons of a French bulldog with an octopus body, a signature character that eventually gathered an enthusiastic following. On his website, Geier sold everything from enameled pins to skateboards to handpainted portraits — most featuring the bulldog’s memorable pink coat and pop eyes. Most recently, Geier planned to open a free art gallery and event space  to be called Squishieland, set to open January 12.

Late Thursday evening, January 3, on Facebook, a flood of allegations poured in, many echoing this one from an Atlanta Facebook user: "After hearing from dozens of women that this Ray Fella thinks it's funny to joke about rape and aids sic, be super abusive to women. Sleep on this artist, his gallery, his events. There are more talented artists in our city. I'm not one to jump on the call-out culture but you just don't have literally dozens of women come forward over the course of a few hours over misunderstandings. Ray, your behavior isn't acceptable.”



The allegations, which go as far as alleged pedophilia, include screenshots of Geier’s revenge porn, targeting those who rejected him sexually. These disturbing screenshots were made public by Atlanta artist and alleged victim Aliya Smith, who, when asked why she felt it important to go public, forwarded Creative Loafing this statement.

“This has been whispered around Atlanta, especially though the art scene, and especially among women, for years,” says Smith, who claims she tried to warn people about her experiences with Geier over a year ago. “I’d had a couple of uncomfortable interactions with him by that point and he made sexual comments about photos of mine that made me deeply uncomfortable."

As it turned out, Smith's experience was tame in comparison with that of others who began to speak out.

“On NYE 2018, Kayleen Scott posted some screenshots from Geier’s old Twitter account, “rayspitsongirls,” to her Instagram story and texted them to me out of anger after finding them,” Smith’s statement continues. “We both decided it was time to stop whispering and start speaking, yelling. A few days later, I posted them to my IG story. I posted anonymous accounts I had received along with my own because I wanted Geier to stop harassing people. I didn’t know how deep it went. In just 24 hours I received hundreds of messages, about 40 or so of which were claims of alleged harassment, assault, revenge porn, as well as talk of underage girls. Then Kayleen and I thought about the gallery he was going to open and we got so scared about the vulnerable young women it could bring in. When Kayleen started warning people about this, it was purely out of protection. When we posted the screenshots this week, it was out of the same motive. The city shouldn’t support anything given the claims we’ve received. And it seems like the city agrees.

“We’ve of course received backlash from people who think this is a conspiracy or a trend of some sort," added Smith, "but the overwhelming support for victims has been amazing.”

Atlanta artist and Facet Gallery owner, Peter Ferrari, also posted concerns involving Geier, just days before Geier was set to open a new retail, event, and art gallery in Grant Park’s latest development, The Beacon Atlanta. When CL reached out to Ferrari regarding the timing of his posts, he confirmed Smith’s statement and added his own take on Geier’s place in Atlanta’s art community, particularly regarding Kayleen Scott, who is also Ferrari’s girlfriend.

“I’ve avoided and actively ignored Ray for several years now. He said really inappropriate things to my girlfriend (artist Kayleen Scott), so I knew he was a creep and possibly worse. It was something shared privately, but often ignored. A friend sent me his video regarding Squishieland. I was immediately skeptical, as it seemed tailor-made to give him access to impressionable artists looking to break into the scene. I made a post on my story about artists being skeptical of those claiming to “support the arts” while simultaneously creeping on young women. I did not name Ray in the post. Afterwards I was contacted by a woman who immediately knew who I was referring to. She told me about his old twitter handle, @rayspitsongirls since deleted and I Googled it. We saw all the tweets. My girlfriend was furious. It brought back years of anger and trauma that she had pushed down. She posted the tweets to her private Instagram and shared her experiences with Ray. Another woman asked if she could share on her public page and see if others had the same experience. Once she did, she was inundated with dozens of accounts from women alleging inappropriate behavior from Ray. From there, it took off, resulting in his outing as an alleged serial mistreater of women and girls in the arts community. The timing was not a coincidence. His opening/gallery brought back trauma and grief to the victims that could not be suppressed. There was a risk to our community that couldn’t be ignored any longer,” Ferrari concluded.

Regardless of who leaked the first tweet, the furor has leveled Geier’s standing and created a significant threat to his career. When contacted by Creative Loafing for a comment on Friday, January 4, Geier responded, "I'm still trying to figure out between ignoring it or making a video / podcast addressing it. so that nothing gets misconstrued. ... That's why I haven't commented, yet. I'm listening." While not getting back to CL directly, Geier finally took to social media Saturday morning January 5, posting a video saying, “I’m ashamed and embarrassed.” More than 500 commenters reacted negatively, agreeing that the video was hardly a remorseful apology.

Within hours, the video and the artist’s social media presence was scrubbed from the internet. Businesses across Atlanta, such as Home Grown GA and Hodgepodge Coffeehouse, were quick to remove all traces of Squishiepuss art.

The Beacon Atlanta issued a statement saying they’ve ended their lease agreement with Geier and he will no longer be a tenant. Click here to read the full statement by The Beacon Atlanta.

Editor's note: This article has been edited since its original publication to more accurately report the story.     Photo Courtesy of Sam Maloney  KING OF POPS HQ: Painting over.  0,0,10    squishie squishiepuss squishypuss puss squi squish skwishy squishipuss                             The Sun Sets on Squishiepuss "
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Article

Saturday January 5, 2019 04:04 pm EST
Days before the opening of Squishieland, a would-be art gallery and event space by Atlanta-based artist Ray Geier, texts and tweets of abuse surface | more...
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  ["title"]=>
  string(63) "Dr. Tommie Smith  —  Stand! In the end, you’ll still be you"
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  string(10) "Tony Paris"
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  string(132) "Dr. Tommie Smith discusses his place at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, sports and justice in Atlanta, and, of course, the Super Bowl"
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  string(132) "Dr. Tommie Smith discusses his place at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, sports and justice in Atlanta, and, of course, the Super Bowl"
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  string(89) "Fifty years later, Tommie Smith's fist is still raised high
Raising a fits for justice
"
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  string(89) "Fifty years later, Tommie Smith's fist is still raised high
Raising a fits for justice
"
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  string(63) "Dr. Tommie Smith  —  Stand! In the end, you’ll still be you"
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  string(11744) "It is a moment those who witnessed firsthand, whether live at the 1968 Mexico City Olympic Games, or on television, will never forget. Tommie Smith and John Carlos, winners of the gold and bronze medals respectively in the 200-meter sprint, bowed their heads and raised their fists to God during the awards ceremony. Fifty thousand people at Estadio Olímpico Universitario went silent as the two U.S. athletes stood on the podium, protesting the disparity between whites and African Americans in this country. 
The silence gave way to shouts of outrage and prayers of reverence, the actions of the two athletes sparking a dialog that continues today. Fifty years later, the United States is still one nation, seeking liberty and justice for all, and while a lot has changed, much has not. NFL football players, borrowing a gesture from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., still find the need to take a knee when “The Star-Spangled Banner” is performed before American football games, provoking outrage from some while gaining the respect of others.
Smith and Carlos were not the first athletes to speak out about civil rights, about human rights. Jackie Robinson and Muhammad Ali immediately come to mind. But Smith and Carlos were the first to do so with the whole world watching. At the Olympics. Without saying a word.
A powerful image, alright. Iconic. I remember the hair standing up on the back of my neck as I watched the two men raise their black-gloved fists, the event being broadcast into my family’s living room from over 1,300 miles away.
Today, nowhere do sports and justice come together more than here in the birthplace of the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the home of the civil rights moment. With Atlanta’s hosting of Super Bowl LIII at the Mercedes-Benz Stadium only weeks away, the themes weave themselves into the fabric of our city, from the High Museum of Art to the National Center for Civil and Human Rights and into the streets with the WonderRoot murals project.
The High Museum of Art exhibit, “With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino & Tommie Smith,” presents a years-long collaboration between the Los Angeles-based conceptual artist and the U.S. gold medal Olympic winner who captured our attention with his silent gesture in 1968.
Smith, a California transplant now living in Stone Mountain, Georgia, is an affable and erudite man who sometimes refers to himself in the third person. Indeed, with the passage of time, it’s easy to understand how the 74-year-old retired college professor might look back and see a different person in the 24-year-old who first broke the 200-meter sprint record in 19.83 seconds, but once Smith starts talking, it’s evident they are one and the same.
When asked if he thinks there are similarities in his actions of 1968 and those of football players today, Smith offers a unique observation, answering in a roundabout way that those who know him expect, but may catch someone just meeting him off guard.
“Growth, personal growth, is the magical idea of moving forward,” Smith says. “In terms of our youth of today, yes, 50 years is a long time, but given our history, it’s short, really. Taking a knee, taking a stand of any kind is a beginning. It’s not an end. I took a stand, and I’m proud of the young athletes now.
“But you know, Tony, when we take a stand, when we take a knee, it must start in the mind, the mind and body growing in the same direction. ‘Why am I doing this? Am I for real doing this? Let me take a check on my feelings.’ There’s more than just taking a stand. There’s why I should take a stand. That’s where I see the growth has really bloomed since 50 years ago.”
What Smith is saying is something the ancient Greeks also believed to be important, that the greatest athletes were of sound body and mind.
He continues, “Too much of anything, I believe, is not good, and too little of the same, I also believe, is just as bad. We’re living in a sphere, a rolling ball. You roll too far, you’re going to go roll off into the water, you don’t roll enough you’re going to be in the desert. So where would you rather be? I would rather be someplace on that sphere where I can survive, but that survival should be of my own intentions. Of doing something good.


“I believe that moving forward takes so much effort and sacrifice, so much effort and thought, that a lot of us don’t want to deal with things that are good. Good takes time. It is a construction phase, such as the exhibit down at the High. That’s my inner feeling. No one has ever asked me about my feeling on the inside, only why I did what I did. And I don’t come up with the right answer, most of the time, why Tommie did what he did on the victory podium. It was a feeling of sacrifice. A feeling of need. And I think that’s the very thing that we sometimes forget. 
“For every action, there is a reaction, and if you’re not prepared for that reaction, then there is a problem. The attack phase is very, very weak. I think 1968 was a start, a start of athletes taking a stand. The athletes doing something good. Of course we are going to be questioned [[his  emphasis]. If we were not questioned, then I would think society to be just as weak as we are strong. As I say, too much of anything is not good, too little of the same is bad. We must be strong enough to deal with the reality of right and wrong. I’m happy that we started in ’68 — the recorded start in ‘68 — because everyone one remembers that stand. But there were a lot of athletes before me who took a stand, but had no way to expound upon it. They had no platform to do so.”
It’s obvious that it took a lot of courage for Smith to raise his fist and bow his head in 1968. But to take off his running shoes and take his place on the podium in black socks, wearing beads around his neck (shoeless to acknowledge the poverty of African Americans at the time; the beads symbolic of the lynchings of America’s Jim Crow past, he explained shortly after the ceremony), also took a lot of introspection. What was going through his mind at the time?
“It’s my time to speak,” Smith explains. “I did very little talking, and no speaking, really, during my college days, especially on the field. I let my feelings be known through my actions on the field. I still believe that the picture is much stronger than the words that can be used to explain it.
“It is the responsibility of those who are in power (to speak out). And I was in power at that time, that power was on the field of play, and my soul needed some type of ending, some type of connection to that power I had on that field of play. And that was with people. I’m a people person — and I had to think about people when I had a platform. And I’m still doing it. I became a school teacher because I wanted to teach. And that’s what I taught in my classrooms from fifth grade to Oberlin College, to Santa Monica College. Off the field, for me now, is at the High Museum. That exhibit is Tommie’s insides.”
Of course, he’s referring to the High Museum of Art exhibit that has been open since September and will continue through February 3. It’s an impressive collaboration of sculpture and documentary, including items from Smith’s personal archives. Highlighted by Kaino’s “Bridge” (2014), a 100-foot-long floating sculpture comprised of gold-painted casts of Smith’s arm and extended fist, the exhibit offers a rare glimpse into Smith and the moment in time which still resonates with us today.
I wondered if Smith believes athletes today enter professional sports to excel, to prove themselves to be the best, or if perhaps the lure of celebrity and financial gain, thanks to corporate sponsorships, has taken their eyes off the prize. 
“Again, we are talking about collaboration,” Smith says. “It’s both, money and position. Of course, a lot of it’s fanfare, but you have to sift through things to find out if it has a soul. Or if it has a heart. This movement of man certainly has a heart, but is that heart pure? Is that heart sound enough for the youth to follow? It takes us all to work through this thing, to make a sacrificial effort of G-O-O-D. Good. And which would you rather do? I don’t want to run with the bad. I’m fighting against that. Bad has a lot of different tentacles. I fight as hard as I can to make that difference.”
And what does Smith think of Atlanta being chosen as the site of Super Bowl LIII, especially after a tumultuous year that has pitted players against owners, the person occupying the White House against the football league, and fans against each other?
“The place of play of Super Bowls, wherever it’s played, is always on  people’s minds — why there? I think the Super Bowl being here is really important, Atlanta being the home of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the historical background as a place of the civil rights movement. It gives a credence to the Super Bowl, not that it was picked for that reason, but it is important because an historical portion of American power comes from Atlanta. One is not dependent on the other, but there is a lot here to see. A lot to learn from.” -CL-

!!Outside Mercedes-Benz Stadium – What to do
!!!With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino and Tommie Smith.
 High Museum of Art, Opening times: 10 a.m., Monday through Friday, 12 p.m., Sunday.Mon.-Fri., 12 p.m. January 10 through February 3. 

!!!Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change, the National Center for Civil and Human Rights.
National Center for Civil and Human Rights, a traveling exhibition that pays homage to athletes who have inspired civil and human rights reform and brought change in the world of sports and beyond. Muhammad Ali, Jackie Robinson, Billie Jean King, Venus Williams, and Jesse Owens are among the legendary athletes featured, but contemporary athletes facing obstacles such as racism, disabilities, gender discrimination, and sexual orientation will also be recognized. Januray 23 through March 29.

!!!Off the Wall: Atlanta’s Civil Rights and Social Justice Journey. 
Local arts and culture organization WonderRoot has partnered with the Atlanta Super Bowl Host Committee to create Off the Wall, a citywide art initiative that aims to generate and elevate conversations about the history and continuing journey of the progression of civil rights in Atlanta. By using murals and community conversation, Off the Wall draws focus to Atlanta’s storied history of progress and social justice, illuminating the crucial role Atlanta plays in the past, present, and future regarding the advancement of civil and human rights. The murals have been slated for installation in the neighborhoods of Vine City, English Avenue, Ashview Heights, and Castleberry Hill that surround Mercedes-Benz Stadium, the Sweet Auburn corridor, and the downtown district, between June 2018 and February 2019. Concepts and basis for the murals were formed at “community conversations,” where Off the Wall discussed and conferred with over 1,000 Atlantans in order to guarantee proper tribute to the city and its people. These ideas were refined at several feedback sessions to ensure maximum community satisfaction. January 10 – ongoing.

Eleven artists have been hand selected to carry out the artwork: Brandan “Bmike” Odums- New Orleans, Yehimi A. Cambrón-  Morelia, Mexico/Atlanta, Sheila Pree Bright- Atlanta, Gilbert Young- Atlanta, Ernest Shaw- Baltimore, Charmaine Minniefield- Atlanta, Muhammad Yungai- Atlanta, Gaia- Baltimore, Reginald “L.E.O.” O’Neal- Miami, Shanequa Gay- Atlanta, The Loss Prevention Arts Collective- Atlanta.


 


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  string(14109) "It is a moment those who witnessed firsthand, whether live at the 1968 Mexico City Olympic Games, or on television, will never forget. Tommie Smith and John Carlos, winners of the gold and bronze medals respectively in the 200-meter sprint, bowed their heads and raised their fists to God during the awards ceremony. Fifty thousand people at Estadio Olímpico Universitario went silent as the two U.S. athletes stood on the podium, protesting the disparity between whites and African Americans in this country. 
The silence gave way to shouts of outrage and prayers of reverence, the actions of the two athletes sparking a dialog that continues today. Fifty years later, the United States is still one nation, seeking liberty and justice for all, and while a lot has changed, much has not. NFL football players, borrowing a gesture from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., still find the need to take a knee when “The Star-Spangled Banner” is performed before American football games, provoking outrage from some while gaining the respect of others.
Smith and Carlos were not the first athletes to speak out about civil rights, about human rights. Jackie Robinson and Muhammad Ali immediately come to mind. But Smith and Carlos were the first to do so with the whole world watching. At the Olympics. Without saying a word.
A powerful image, alright. Iconic. I remember the hair standing up on the back of my neck as I watched the two men raise their black-gloved fists, the event being broadcast into my family’s living room from over 1,300 miles away.
Today, nowhere do sports and justice come together more than here in the birthplace of the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the home of the civil rights moment. With Atlanta’s hosting of Super Bowl LIII at the Mercedes-Benz Stadium only weeks away, the themes weave themselves into the fabric of our city, from the High Museum of Art to the National Center for Civil and Human Rights and into the streets with the WonderRoot murals project.
The High Museum of Art exhibit, “With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino & Tommie Smith,” presents a years-long collaboration between the Los Angeles-based conceptual artist and the U.S. gold medal Olympic winner who captured our attention with his silent gesture in 1968.
Smith, a California transplant now living in Stone Mountain, Georgia, is an affable and erudite man who sometimes refers to himself in the third person. Indeed, with the passage of time, it’s easy to understand how the 74-year-old retired college professor might look back and see a different person in the 24-year-old who first broke the 200-meter sprint record in 19.83 seconds, but once Smith starts talking, it’s evident they are one and the same.
When asked if he thinks there are similarities in his actions of 1968 and those of football players today, Smith offers a unique observation, answering in a roundabout way that those who know him expect, but may catch someone just meeting him off guard.
“Growth, personal growth, is the magical idea of moving forward,” Smith says. “In terms of our youth of today, yes, 50 years is a long time, but given our history, it’s short, really. Taking a knee, taking a stand of any kind is a beginning. It’s not an end. I took a stand, and I’m proud of the young athletes now.
“But you know, Tony, when we take a stand, when we take a knee, it must start in the mind, the mind and body growing in the same direction. ‘Why am I doing this? Am I for real doing this? Let me take a check on my feelings.’ There’s more than just taking a stand. There’s why I should take a stand. That’s where I see the growth has really bloomed since 50 years ago.”
What Smith is saying is something the ancient Greeks also believed to be important, that the greatest athletes were of sound body and mind.
He continues, “Too much of anything, I believe, is not good, and too little of the same, I also believe, is just as bad. We’re living in a sphere, a rolling ball. You roll too far, you’re going to go roll off into the water, you don’t roll enough you’re going to be in the desert. So where would you rather be? I would rather be someplace on that sphere where I can survive, but that survival should be of my own intentions. Of doing something good.

{img fileId="12435" stylebox="float: right; margin-left: 25px;" desc="LOOK TO YOUR SOUL: Reflections in a man standing tall. Glenn Kaino’s “Invisible Man” is not that at all. Photo courtesy of the High Museum." width="400"}
“I believe that moving forward takes so much effort and sacrifice, so much effort and thought, that a lot of us don’t want to deal with things that are good. Good takes time. It is a construction phase, such as the exhibit down at the High. That’s my inner feeling. No one has ever asked me about my feeling on the inside, only why I did what I did. And I don’t come up with the right answer, most of the time, why Tommie did what he did on the victory podium. It was a feeling of sacrifice. A feeling of need. And I think that’s the very thing that we sometimes forget. 
“For every action, there is a reaction, and if you’re not prepared for that reaction, then there is a problem. The attack phase is very, very weak. I think 1968 was a start, a start of athletes taking a stand. The athletes doing something good. Of course we are going to be questioned [[[[his  emphasis]. If we were not questioned, then I would think society to be just as weak as we are strong. As I say, too much of anything is not good, too little of the same is bad. We must be strong enough to deal with the reality of right and wrong. I’m happy that we started in ’68 — the recorded start in ‘68 — because everyone one remembers that stand. But there were a lot of athletes before me who took a stand, but had no way to expound upon it. They had no platform to do so.”
It’s obvious that it took a lot of courage for Smith to raise his fist and bow his head in 1968. But to take off his running shoes and take his place on the podium in black socks, wearing beads around his neck (shoeless to acknowledge the poverty of African Americans at the time; the beads symbolic of the lynchings of America’s Jim Crow past, he explained shortly after the ceremony), also took a lot of introspection. What was going through his mind at the time?
“It’s my time to speak,” Smith explains. “I did very little talking, and no speaking, really, during my college days, especially on the field. I let my feelings be known through my actions on the field. I still believe that the picture is much stronger than the words that can be used to explain it.
“It is the responsibility of those who are in power (to speak out). And I was in power at that time, that power was on the field of play, and my soul needed some type of ending, some type of connection to that power I had on that field of play. And that was with people. I’m a people person — and I had to think about people when I had a platform. And I’m still doing it. I became a school teacher because I wanted to teach. And that’s what I taught in my classrooms from fifth grade to Oberlin College, to Santa Monica College. Off the field, for me now, is at the High Museum. That exhibit is Tommie’s insides.”
Of course, he’s referring to the High Museum of Art exhibit that has been open since September and will continue through February 3. It’s an impressive collaboration of sculpture and documentary, including items from Smith’s personal archives. Highlighted by Kaino’s “Bridge” (2014), a 100-foot-long floating sculpture comprised of gold-painted casts of Smith’s arm and extended fist, the exhibit offers a rare glimpse into Smith and the moment in time which still resonates with us today.
I wondered if Smith believes athletes today enter professional sports to excel, to prove themselves to be the best, or if perhaps the lure of celebrity and financial gain, thanks to corporate sponsorships, has taken their eyes off the prize. 
“Again, we are talking about collaboration,” Smith says. “It’s both, money and position. Of course, a lot of it’s fanfare, but you have to sift through things to find out if it has a soul. Or if it has a heart. This movement of man certainly has a heart, but is that heart pure? Is that heart sound enough for the youth to follow? It takes us all to work through this thing, to make a sacrificial effort of G-O-O-D. Good. And which would you rather do? I don’t want to run with the bad. I’m fighting against that. Bad has a lot of different tentacles. I fight as hard as I can to make that difference.”
And what does Smith think of Atlanta being chosen as the site of Super Bowl LIII, especially after a tumultuous year that has pitted players against owners, the person occupying the White House against the football league, and fans against each other?
“The place of play of Super Bowls, wherever it’s played, is always on  people’s minds — why there? I think the Super Bowl being here is really important, Atlanta being the home of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the historical background as a place of the civil rights movement. It gives a credence to the Super Bowl, not that it was picked for that reason, but it is important because an historical portion of American power comes from Atlanta. One is not dependent on the other, but there is a lot here to see. A lot to learn from.” __-CL-__

!!__Outside Mercedes-Benz Stadium – What to do__
!!!__With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino and Tommie Smith.__
 High Museum of Art, Opening times: 10 a.m., Monday through Friday, 12 p.m., Sunday.Mon.-Fri., 12 p.m. January 10 through February 3. 

!!!__Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change, the National Center for Civil and Human Rights.__
National Center for Civil and Human Rights, a traveling exhibition that pays homage to athletes who have inspired civil and human rights reform and brought change in the world of sports and beyond. Muhammad Ali, Jackie Robinson, Billie Jean King, Venus Williams, and Jesse Owens are among the legendary athletes featured, but contemporary athletes facing obstacles such as racism, disabilities, gender discrimination, and sexual orientation will also be recognized. Januray 23 through March 29.

!!!__Off the Wall: Atlanta’s Civil Rights and Social Justice Journey. __
Local arts and culture organization WonderRoot has partnered with the Atlanta Super Bowl Host Committee to create ''Off the Wall'', a citywide art initiative that aims to generate and elevate conversations about the history and continuing journey of the progression of civil rights in Atlanta. By using murals and community conversation, ''Off the Wall'' draws focus to Atlanta’s storied history of progress and social justice, illuminating the crucial role Atlanta plays in the past, present, and future regarding the advancement of civil and human rights. The murals have been slated for installation in the neighborhoods of Vine City, English Avenue, Ashview Heights, and Castleberry Hill that surround Mercedes-Benz Stadium, the Sweet Auburn corridor, and the downtown district, between June 2018 and February 2019. Concepts and basis for the murals were formed at “community conversations,” where ''Off the Wall'' discussed and conferred with over 1,000 Atlantans in order to guarantee proper tribute to the city and its people. These ideas were refined at several feedback sessions to ensure maximum community satisfaction. January 10 – ongoing.

Eleven artists have been hand selected to carry out the artwork: Brandan “Bmike” Odums- New Orleans, Yehimi A. Cambrón-  Morelia, Mexico/Atlanta, Sheila Pree Bright- Atlanta, Gilbert Young- Atlanta, Ernest Shaw- Baltimore, Charmaine Minniefield- Atlanta, Muhammad Yungai- Atlanta, Gaia- Baltimore, Reginald “L.E.O.” O’Neal- Miami, Shanequa Gay- Atlanta, The Loss Prevention Arts Collective- Atlanta.

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{BOX( bg="#e5e5ff" width="75%" align="left")} __Friday, February 1:__
Super Bowl Experience, $40-$55, Georgia World Congress Center, 10 a.m. 
Off The Field Players’ Wives Association FASHION SHOW 2019, TBA, Shops of Buckhead, Atlanta, 12 p.m.
Super Bowl Live Presented by Verizon, Free, Centennial Hall, 2 p.m.  
First and Goal Comedy Bowl, Free, College Football Hall of Fame, 8 p.m. 
Bud Light Super Bowl Music Fest: Aerosmith with Post Malone, $100-$950, State Farm Arena, 9 p.m. 
Shaq’s Fun House with interactive circus. Tickets start at $299.99, Battery, Atlanta, 9 p.m.
Game Love and Hennessy, Free to $109.00, Atrium Event Center, 9 p.m. 
__Saturday, February 2:__ 
Super Bowl Breakfast, $200-$2500, Atlanta Marriott Marquis. 8 a.m.
Super Bowl Experience, $40-$55, Georgia World Congress Center, 10 a.m.  
World’s Largest Tailgate: A Tailgate with a Mission, Free with registration, Georgia International Convention Center, 10 a.m.
Super Bowl Live Presented by Verizon, Free, Centennial Hall, 11 a.m. 
Atlanta Big Game Day Party, $10-$160, 5 Seasons Brewing Company, Westside Atlanta, 4 p.m.
Taste of the NFL, $700.00, Cobb Galleria Centre, 7 p.m. 
2019 Maxim Super Bowl Party, TBD, The Fairmont, 9 p.m.
The Big Game Weekend, the ATL’s all-inclusive party, $150-$1200, Ambient + Studio, 9 p.m.
Super Saturday featuring Foo Fighters and Run The Jewels, sold-out, Atlantic Station, 9 p.m.
Bud Light Super Bowl Music Fest: Bruno Mars and Cardi B., $150-$1,550, State Farm Arena, 9 p.m.
ESP 101 [[Learn to Believe], Big Game Party, $50 - $100, IRIS (aka Rush Lounge), 9 p.m.
__Sunday, February 3:__
The Big Game Party, $5-$20, Genesis, The Chamber, 11 a.m.-11 p.m..
Cheer and Beers: The Big Game, $89, Dantanna’s, Buckhead, 12 p.m. 
Super Bowl Experience , $40-$55, Georgia World Congress Center, 2 p.m. 
Salvatore Ferragamo Big Day Party, $400, Antica Posta Restaurant, 5 p.m. 
The Big Game Watch Party, No Cover, Sweet Auburn Barbecue, Highland Ave, 6:30 p.m.
{BOX}
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  string(12731) " News05 SuperBowl1 1 18  2019-01-10T15:05:28+00:00 news05_SuperBowl1-1_18.jpg    tommie smith super bowl atlanta 1968 olympics mexico city 1968 john carlos high museum of art superbowl liii sports and justice Dr. Tommie Smith discusses his place at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, sports and justice in Atlanta, and, of course, the Super Bowl 12432  2019-01-02T15:00:00+00:00 Dr. Tommie Smith  —  Stand! In the end, you’ll still be you jim.harris@creativeloafing.com Jim Harris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2019-01-02T15:00:00+00:00 Fifty years later, Tommie Smith's fist is still raised high
Raising a fits for justice
 It is a moment those who witnessed firsthand, whether live at the 1968 Mexico City Olympic Games, or on television, will never forget. Tommie Smith and John Carlos, winners of the gold and bronze medals respectively in the 200-meter sprint, bowed their heads and raised their fists to God during the awards ceremony. Fifty thousand people at Estadio Olímpico Universitario went silent as the two U.S. athletes stood on the podium, protesting the disparity between whites and African Americans in this country. 
The silence gave way to shouts of outrage and prayers of reverence, the actions of the two athletes sparking a dialog that continues today. Fifty years later, the United States is still one nation, seeking liberty and justice for all, and while a lot has changed, much has not. NFL football players, borrowing a gesture from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., still find the need to take a knee when “The Star-Spangled Banner” is performed before American football games, provoking outrage from some while gaining the respect of others.
Smith and Carlos were not the first athletes to speak out about civil rights, about human rights. Jackie Robinson and Muhammad Ali immediately come to mind. But Smith and Carlos were the first to do so with the whole world watching. At the Olympics. Without saying a word.
A powerful image, alright. Iconic. I remember the hair standing up on the back of my neck as I watched the two men raise their black-gloved fists, the event being broadcast into my family’s living room from over 1,300 miles away.
Today, nowhere do sports and justice come together more than here in the birthplace of the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the home of the civil rights moment. With Atlanta’s hosting of Super Bowl LIII at the Mercedes-Benz Stadium only weeks away, the themes weave themselves into the fabric of our city, from the High Museum of Art to the National Center for Civil and Human Rights and into the streets with the WonderRoot murals project.
The High Museum of Art exhibit, “With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino & Tommie Smith,” presents a years-long collaboration between the Los Angeles-based conceptual artist and the U.S. gold medal Olympic winner who captured our attention with his silent gesture in 1968.
Smith, a California transplant now living in Stone Mountain, Georgia, is an affable and erudite man who sometimes refers to himself in the third person. Indeed, with the passage of time, it’s easy to understand how the 74-year-old retired college professor might look back and see a different person in the 24-year-old who first broke the 200-meter sprint record in 19.83 seconds, but once Smith starts talking, it’s evident they are one and the same.
When asked if he thinks there are similarities in his actions of 1968 and those of football players today, Smith offers a unique observation, answering in a roundabout way that those who know him expect, but may catch someone just meeting him off guard.
“Growth, personal growth, is the magical idea of moving forward,” Smith says. “In terms of our youth of today, yes, 50 years is a long time, but given our history, it’s short, really. Taking a knee, taking a stand of any kind is a beginning. It’s not an end. I took a stand, and I’m proud of the young athletes now.
“But you know, Tony, when we take a stand, when we take a knee, it must start in the mind, the mind and body growing in the same direction. ‘Why am I doing this? Am I for real doing this? Let me take a check on my feelings.’ There’s more than just taking a stand. There’s why I should take a stand. That’s where I see the growth has really bloomed since 50 years ago.”
What Smith is saying is something the ancient Greeks also believed to be important, that the greatest athletes were of sound body and mind.
He continues, “Too much of anything, I believe, is not good, and too little of the same, I also believe, is just as bad. We’re living in a sphere, a rolling ball. You roll too far, you’re going to go roll off into the water, you don’t roll enough you’re going to be in the desert. So where would you rather be? I would rather be someplace on that sphere where I can survive, but that survival should be of my own intentions. Of doing something good.


“I believe that moving forward takes so much effort and sacrifice, so much effort and thought, that a lot of us don’t want to deal with things that are good. Good takes time. It is a construction phase, such as the exhibit down at the High. That’s my inner feeling. No one has ever asked me about my feeling on the inside, only why I did what I did. And I don’t come up with the right answer, most of the time, why Tommie did what he did on the victory podium. It was a feeling of sacrifice. A feeling of need. And I think that’s the very thing that we sometimes forget. 
“For every action, there is a reaction, and if you’re not prepared for that reaction, then there is a problem. The attack phase is very, very weak. I think 1968 was a start, a start of athletes taking a stand. The athletes doing something good. Of course we are going to be questioned [[his  emphasis]. If we were not questioned, then I would think society to be just as weak as we are strong. As I say, too much of anything is not good, too little of the same is bad. We must be strong enough to deal with the reality of right and wrong. I’m happy that we started in ’68 — the recorded start in ‘68 — because everyone one remembers that stand. But there were a lot of athletes before me who took a stand, but had no way to expound upon it. They had no platform to do so.”
It’s obvious that it took a lot of courage for Smith to raise his fist and bow his head in 1968. But to take off his running shoes and take his place on the podium in black socks, wearing beads around his neck (shoeless to acknowledge the poverty of African Americans at the time; the beads symbolic of the lynchings of America’s Jim Crow past, he explained shortly after the ceremony), also took a lot of introspection. What was going through his mind at the time?
“It’s my time to speak,” Smith explains. “I did very little talking, and no speaking, really, during my college days, especially on the field. I let my feelings be known through my actions on the field. I still believe that the picture is much stronger than the words that can be used to explain it.
“It is the responsibility of those who are in power (to speak out). And I was in power at that time, that power was on the field of play, and my soul needed some type of ending, some type of connection to that power I had on that field of play. And that was with people. I’m a people person — and I had to think about people when I had a platform. And I’m still doing it. I became a school teacher because I wanted to teach. And that’s what I taught in my classrooms from fifth grade to Oberlin College, to Santa Monica College. Off the field, for me now, is at the High Museum. That exhibit is Tommie’s insides.”
Of course, he’s referring to the High Museum of Art exhibit that has been open since September and will continue through February 3. It’s an impressive collaboration of sculpture and documentary, including items from Smith’s personal archives. Highlighted by Kaino’s “Bridge” (2014), a 100-foot-long floating sculpture comprised of gold-painted casts of Smith’s arm and extended fist, the exhibit offers a rare glimpse into Smith and the moment in time which still resonates with us today.
I wondered if Smith believes athletes today enter professional sports to excel, to prove themselves to be the best, or if perhaps the lure of celebrity and financial gain, thanks to corporate sponsorships, has taken their eyes off the prize. 
“Again, we are talking about collaboration,” Smith says. “It’s both, money and position. Of course, a lot of it’s fanfare, but you have to sift through things to find out if it has a soul. Or if it has a heart. This movement of man certainly has a heart, but is that heart pure? Is that heart sound enough for the youth to follow? It takes us all to work through this thing, to make a sacrificial effort of G-O-O-D. Good. And which would you rather do? I don’t want to run with the bad. I’m fighting against that. Bad has a lot of different tentacles. I fight as hard as I can to make that difference.”
And what does Smith think of Atlanta being chosen as the site of Super Bowl LIII, especially after a tumultuous year that has pitted players against owners, the person occupying the White House against the football league, and fans against each other?
“The place of play of Super Bowls, wherever it’s played, is always on  people’s minds — why there? I think the Super Bowl being here is really important, Atlanta being the home of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the historical background as a place of the civil rights movement. It gives a credence to the Super Bowl, not that it was picked for that reason, but it is important because an historical portion of American power comes from Atlanta. One is not dependent on the other, but there is a lot here to see. A lot to learn from.” -CL-

!!Outside Mercedes-Benz Stadium – What to do
!!!With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino and Tommie Smith.
 High Museum of Art, Opening times: 10 a.m., Monday through Friday, 12 p.m., Sunday.Mon.-Fri., 12 p.m. January 10 through February 3. 

!!!Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change, the National Center for Civil and Human Rights.
National Center for Civil and Human Rights, a traveling exhibition that pays homage to athletes who have inspired civil and human rights reform and brought change in the world of sports and beyond. Muhammad Ali, Jackie Robinson, Billie Jean King, Venus Williams, and Jesse Owens are among the legendary athletes featured, but contemporary athletes facing obstacles such as racism, disabilities, gender discrimination, and sexual orientation will also be recognized. Januray 23 through March 29.

!!!Off the Wall: Atlanta’s Civil Rights and Social Justice Journey. 
Local arts and culture organization WonderRoot has partnered with the Atlanta Super Bowl Host Committee to create Off the Wall, a citywide art initiative that aims to generate and elevate conversations about the history and continuing journey of the progression of civil rights in Atlanta. By using murals and community conversation, Off the Wall draws focus to Atlanta’s storied history of progress and social justice, illuminating the crucial role Atlanta plays in the past, present, and future regarding the advancement of civil and human rights. The murals have been slated for installation in the neighborhoods of Vine City, English Avenue, Ashview Heights, and Castleberry Hill that surround Mercedes-Benz Stadium, the Sweet Auburn corridor, and the downtown district, between June 2018 and February 2019. Concepts and basis for the murals were formed at “community conversations,” where Off the Wall discussed and conferred with over 1,000 Atlantans in order to guarantee proper tribute to the city and its people. These ideas were refined at several feedback sessions to ensure maximum community satisfaction. January 10 – ongoing.

Eleven artists have been hand selected to carry out the artwork: Brandan “Bmike” Odums- New Orleans, Yehimi A. Cambrón-  Morelia, Mexico/Atlanta, Sheila Pree Bright- Atlanta, Gilbert Young- Atlanta, Ernest Shaw- Baltimore, Charmaine Minniefield- Atlanta, Muhammad Yungai- Atlanta, Gaia- Baltimore, Reginald “L.E.O.” O’Neal- Miami, Shanequa Gay- Atlanta, The Loss Prevention Arts Collective- Atlanta.


 


     Courtesy the High Museum of Art PAST TO PRESENT: “The Bridge” by Glenn Kaino. Smith’s fist casts many shadows.  0,0,10    "super bowl atlanta" "Tommie Smith" "1968 Olympics" "Mexico city" 1968 "John Carlos" "High Museum of Art" "Superbowl LIII" "sports and justice"                             Dr. Tommie Smith  —  Stand! In the end, you’ll still be you "
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Wednesday January 2, 2019 10:00 am EST
Dr. Tommie Smith discusses his place at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, sports and justice in Atlanta, and, of course, the Super Bowl | more...
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Since 2006, MINT has provided a (sometimes roving) space where Atlanta’s young artists and creative communities can show their work. Over the years, MINT, now located at 92 Peachtree Street S.W., has exhibited contemporary and experimental works by more than 1,000 artists. In November, the organization announced that it has become W.A.G.E. certified — that’s an anagram for Working Artists and the Greater Economy.

W.A.G.E. is a New York-based organization focused on regulating payments and maintaining sustainable relationships between artists and the institutions who contract their work, regardless of sales. To see this through, MINT partnered with the City of Atlanta and an anonymous donor to raise $10,000 to fun W.A.G.E. efforts. MINT's certification is retroactively effective as of July 1, 2018.

Being included on the W.A.G.E roster places MINT on a short list of high-profile galleries, museums, and arts organizations such as The Art Institute of Chicago, The Guggenheim, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and MOMA. MINT is also the first W.A.G.E.-certified organization in the state of Georgia, which, according to the National Assembly of Arts Agencies, ranks 49th lowest per capita arts funding in the U.S.

To talk more about what becoming W.A.G.E. certified means, MINT’s Executive Director Cory Klose paid a visit to CL’s Short Notice studio.

On Sat., Dec. 8, MINT hosts an opening reception for Small Enough To Hold, an exhibition featuring works by Leap Year artist Crystal Desai (on view through Jan. 12). Free. from 7-10 p.m. 92 Peachtree Street S.W.



Music for this podcast is provided by Delorean Gray.

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~~#000000:Since 2006,~~ [https://www.mintatl.org/|MINT] ~~#000000:has provided a (sometimes roving) space where Atlanta’s young artists and creative communities can show their work. Over the years, MINT, now located at 92 Peachtree Street S.W., has exhibited contemporary and experimental works by more than 1,000 artists. In November, the organization announced that it has become ~~[https://wageforwork.com/certification|W.A.G.E.] ~~#000000:certified — that’s an anagram for Working Artists and the Greater Economy.~~

~~#000000:W.A.G.E. is a New York-based organization focused on regulating payments and maintaining sustainable relationships between artists and the institutions who contract their work, regardless of sales. To see this through, MINT partnered with the City of Atlanta and an anonymous donor to raise $10,000 to fun W.A.G.E. efforts. MINT's certification is retroactively effective as of July 1, 2018.~~

~~#000000:Being included on the W.A.G.E roster places MINT on a short list of high-profile galleries, museums, and arts organizations such as The Art Institute of Chicago, The Guggenheim, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and MOMA. MINT is also the first W.A.G.E.-certified organization in the state of Georgia, which, according to the [https://nasaa-arts.org/|National Assembly of Arts Agencies], ranks 49th lowest per capita arts funding in the U.S.~~

~~#000000:To talk more about what becoming W.A.G.E. certified means, MINT’s Executive Director Cory Klose paid a visit to CL’s Short Notice studio.~~

''~~#000000:On Sat., Dec. 8, MINT hosts an opening reception for~~ [https://www.mintatl.org/calendar/|Small Enough To Hold, an exhibition featuring works by Leap Year artist Crystal Desai (on view through Jan. 12)]~~#000000:. Free. from 7-10 p.m. 92 Peachtree Street S.W.~~''

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~~#000000:Music for this podcast is provided by~~ [https://graydelorean.bandcamp.com/|Delorean Gray].

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Since 2006, MINT has provided a (sometimes roving) space where Atlanta’s young artists and creative communities can show their work. Over the years, MINT, now located at 92 Peachtree Street S.W., has exhibited contemporary and experimental works by more than 1,000 artists. In November, the organization announced that it has become W.A.G.E. certified — that’s an anagram for Working Artists and the Greater Economy.

W.A.G.E. is a New York-based organization focused on regulating payments and maintaining sustainable relationships between artists and the institutions who contract their work, regardless of sales. To see this through, MINT partnered with the City of Atlanta and an anonymous donor to raise $10,000 to fun W.A.G.E. efforts. MINT's certification is retroactively effective as of July 1, 2018.

Being included on the W.A.G.E roster places MINT on a short list of high-profile galleries, museums, and arts organizations such as The Art Institute of Chicago, The Guggenheim, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and MOMA. MINT is also the first W.A.G.E.-certified organization in the state of Georgia, which, according to the National Assembly of Arts Agencies, ranks 49th lowest per capita arts funding in the U.S.

To talk more about what becoming W.A.G.E. certified means, MINT’s Executive Director Cory Klose paid a visit to CL’s Short Notice studio.

On Sat., Dec. 8, MINT hosts an opening reception for Small Enough To Hold, an exhibition featuring works by Leap Year artist Crystal Desai (on view through Jan. 12). Free. from 7-10 p.m. 92 Peachtree Street S.W.



Music for this podcast is provided by Delorean Gray.

     Chad Radford ARTS AND COMMERCE: MINT, located at 92 Peachtree S.W. recently earned W.A.G.E. certification.                                   Podcast: MINT earns W.A.G.E. certification "
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Free (donations at the door). 6 p.m. Sun., Nov. 4. Pratt-Pullman Yard, 225 Rogers St. N.E. www.facebook.com/events/649809412080971.    Courtesy Sarah Keys TOES                                   A one-night exhibition honors the life and work of TOES "
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Thursday November 1, 2018 11:10 am EDT
Over//Under takes over Pratt-Pullman Yard with an evening of art, projections, and classical music | more...
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  string(4112) "Two lifelong artists and activists, Rozina Shiraz Gilani and Matheus Blasczak, are on a mission to promote a new way for Atlanta to experience and support art. Their new group, Atlanta’s Radical Art Community, will host its debut showcase, titled “Resist: A Simulation of Struggle,” on September 21-22.

The interactive multimedia show will take place at the Collective Ink & Art Society’s studio and promises to be like nothing you’ve experienced before. “Resist: A Simulation of Struggle,” featuring more than 16 political artists, will explore social and political topics through a spectrum of mediums, from tattoo to dance. Attendees will not just witness the showcase, but participate in it through visual and performance projects.

Rich and varied life experiences have led Gilani, the mind behind the show, and Blasczak, her assistant, to undertake such a project. Gilani studies, choreographs, and teaches Indian classical dance. As a child, she used dance to perform traditional Hindu epics, but felt little connection to the stories. Her dance became intertwined with her work as a social justice and community organizer when she first visited Palestine more than a decade ago. There, where she taught and choreographed Indian classical dance, working alongside local organizers and exposure to political artists inspired her to use her art form as a medium for liberation. When she left, she carried her new philosophy with her.

“As I started to invest more in community and social justice issues,” Gilani says. “I realized my art had the capacity to serve as a sort of movement testimony. I focused more on the stories that I felt were relevant and could touch people, move people towards action.”

Blasczak, a Brazil-born transplant to Atlanta, found himself troubled by the slew of violent injustices occurring in the United States. He volunteered for the 2016 Bernie Sanders campaign, which became his first foray into activism. But the intersection of art and activism for Blasczak took a more profound form following his experience with the No Dakota Access Pipeline (NODAPL) campaign.

While brainstorming art to take to North Dakota, Blasczak sought the advice of members of the indigenous community’s on how to appropriately use Native American themes and images. The owner of Little Five Points’ Coyote Trading Company advised him to recreate Native American art only when his mind was clear and positive, then drew a buffalo design for him that Blasczak replicated on banners he created for NODAPL.

In North Dakota, Blasczak met an indigenous woman named Great White Buffalo, who immediately felt a connection to his banners and asked him to paint the design on her tent. She told Blasczak that the symbol of the buffalo would protect her from the Black Snake energy of the pipeline.

“That Buffalo — just that whole journey, was a very epic moment in terms of relating art and activism,” says Blasczak, who has since obtained a tattoo of the same buffalo design.

The common and central thread for Gilani and Blasczak was learning how art could — and should — be more than just beautiful. Both see art as a sacred exchange, and like any successful exchange, participants have a responsibility to communicate with one another. After their upcoming show, Gilani and Blasczak hope to create more spaces for radical artists to showcase and connect with one another and to ultimately build a self-reliant community, independent of institutional support, where issues of racism, sexism, fascism, colonialism, transphobia, homophobia, islamophobia, ableism and xenophobia can be challenged head on.

Of the upcoming exhibit, Blasczak says,“It’s an open door for different experiences for different folks. Be ready when you walk in the door to either be challenged or celebrated.” 

Experience Atlanta’s Radical Art Community’s debut. $15 suggested. 7:30-11:30 p.m. Sept. 21-22. Collective Ink & Arts Studio, Ste. 5097, 675 Metropolitan Parkway S.W. 404-993-2811. https://www.tickettailor.com/events/atlantasradicalartcommunity. "
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The interactive multimedia show will take place at the Collective Ink & Art Society’s studio and promises to be like nothing you’ve experienced before. “Resist: A Simulation of Struggle,” featuring more than 16 political artists, will explore social and political topics through a spectrum of mediums, from tattoo to dance. Attendees will not just witness the showcase, but participate in it through visual and performance projects.

Rich and varied life experiences have led Gilani, the mind behind the show, and Blasczak, her assistant, to undertake such a project. Gilani studies, choreographs, and teaches Indian classical dance. As a child, she used dance to perform traditional Hindu epics, but felt little connection to the stories. Her dance became intertwined with her work as a social justice and community organizer when she first visited Palestine more than a decade ago. There, where she taught and choreographed Indian classical dance, working alongside local organizers and exposure to political artists inspired her to use her art form as a medium for liberation. When she left, she carried her new philosophy with her.

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Blasczak, a Brazil-born transplant to Atlanta, found himself troubled by the slew of violent injustices occurring in the United States. He volunteered for the 2016 Bernie Sanders campaign, which became his first foray into activism. But the intersection of art and activism for Blasczak took a more profound form following his experience with the No Dakota Access Pipeline (NODAPL) campaign.

While brainstorming art to take to North Dakota, Blasczak sought the advice of members of the indigenous community’s on how to appropriately use Native American themes and images. The owner of Little Five Points’ Coyote Trading Company advised him to recreate Native American art only when his mind was clear and positive, then drew a buffalo design for him that Blasczak replicated on banners he created for NODAPL.

In North Dakota, Blasczak met an indigenous woman named Great White Buffalo, who immediately felt a connection to his banners and asked him to paint the design on her tent. She told Blasczak that the symbol of the buffalo would protect her from the Black Snake energy of the pipeline.

“That Buffalo — just that whole journey, was a very epic moment in terms of relating art and activism,” says Blasczak, who has since obtained a tattoo of the same buffalo design.

The common and central thread for Gilani and Blasczak was learning how art could — and should — be more than just beautiful. Both see art as a sacred exchange, and like any successful exchange, participants have a responsibility to communicate with one another. After their upcoming show, Gilani and Blasczak hope to create more spaces for radical artists to showcase and connect with one another and to ultimately build a self-reliant community, independent of institutional support, where issues of racism, sexism, fascism, colonialism, transphobia, homophobia, islamophobia, ableism and xenophobia can be challenged head on.

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Thursday September 20, 2018 05:00 am EDT
Rozina Shiraz Gilani and Matheus Blasczak hope to activate Atlanta with ‘Resist: A Simulation of Struggle’ | more...
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  string(7566) "Alien puppets, spaceship props, and a bioluminescent rainforest transformed the vibrantly painted warehouse into a distant planet, where extraterrestrial performers executed the fluid musical stagecraft of Joshua Loner’s intergalactic space-opera Celesthesia 1.5: Light Speed! The decorative installations were crafted with love by local artists and volunteers, each part recycled from materials left behind at a wedding the week before.

The hybrid musical-theatre performance illustrates the self-reliant and fiercely creative energy cultivated by the Bakery, a progressive, multi-use arts and music venue on Atlanta’s Southwest side.

On the cusp of Oakland City and the rapidly gentrifying Adair Park, the Bakery sits between the Westside BeltLine Trail and the Aluma Farm. Slathered in hand-painted pastel murals and artful graffiti, the warehouse was once a functioning bakery in the ‘50s, ‘60s, and ‘70s, before housing secretive rave party hotspots CoLab and Kaleidoscape circa 2006-2016. Since founder and creative director Willow Goldstein and her mother, Olive Hagemeier, took over the space in October of 2017, she and a team of volunteers have shifted away from the building’s former rave affiliations and have developed the Bakery as a community center for DIY arts, music, and education.

Over the last year, like-minded independent gallery and venue spaces such as Mammal Gallery and Eyedrum have been forced out of their buildings, casualties of a wave of gentrification sweeping over South Downtown.

The Bakery is fighting to preserve legitimacy for community-based arts. “I have said it’s inherently DIY because my mom has taught me to just do everything ourselves my whole life,” Goldstein says. “I have been trying to recall when DIY, as an ethos, first entered my vocabulary, and it definitely is more recently. I'm certainly trying to run a business — not turn a profit necessarily — that balances DIY with more traditional operations because I want people to be paid and valued and sustained. I'm absolutely not working toward 501(3)(c) status because while we operate largely as a team with regular team/staff meetings, I still retain decision-making power,” she adds. “This is based on my past experience and frustrations with nonprofits.”
As an Eyedrum Art & Music Gallery board member, Goldstein's administrative and curatorial experiences have allowed her to continue building professional and friendly relationships with many of the artists and volunteers who now contribute to the Bakery. When she and her mother began focusing their energies on building up the Bakery and assembling a team of volunteers through social media and Craigslist ads, they were met by a flood of artists eager for a place to showcase their work.

Their efforts highlighted a dilemma: While there is an abundance of compelling art being created by Atlanta-based artists, there’s a lack of spaces in which it can be presented. “The caliber of artwork brought to a warehouse in this random location was surprising,” Goldstein says.

Goldstein handles art curation and community building. In the meantime, musical programming is overseen by fellow Eyedrum board member Daniel DeSimone, who also plays bass for local grindcore band Malevich. While DeSimone’s promotion company, Face of Knives Productions, focuses on heavy metal, post-rock, and abstract noise acts, he also books artists of all genres, ensuring that guests of the Bakery experience something new every time they return. “I’d rather throw a thousand genuine artists against our walls just to see what sticks rather than try to craft the most appealing lineup to the masses or some capitalist entity,” he says. “That way, even if a show is weird, at least I’ll know it’s going to be sick. It’s about curating valuable art from a revolving door of different people and building a genuine and positive environment around that.”

For Goldstein, keeping that door revolving means expanding programming to accommodate community gatherings and educational opportunities. This includes technology workshops with Streetcat.media’s Maggie Kane and art classes such as photography and life drawing.

The Bakery houses a handful of performance spaces, affording time and square-footage to host yoga classes, afternoon art and technology workshops, evening film screenings, and a full bill of musical performances to finish off the night. The venue even offers a small daytime coffee shop with snacks and drinks, where the staff of PLASMA Magazine operates editorial meetings in exchange for people power and promotion for the Bakery’s events. A large team of multi-talented artists and media producers came to the Bakery in search of residency and workshop space, and many have found themselves organically folded into the team as their talents were needed for programming, curation, and the extra elbow grease required to maintain a DIY space.

Goldstein and DeSimone want everyone who comes to the Bakery to feel comfortable being who they are, as long as they are respectful. The building features a gender-neutral bathroom facility, and programming regularly promotes gender equality. The venue hosted the Southern Fried Queer Pride festival in June of this year. “If I am a gender nonconforming person, am I going to have to fight the battle that I have to fight every day of my life just to go see a show?” DeSimone says. “There should be a space where no one feels that they are going to be heckled by drunk people just for being different.”

Programming is overseen by Goldstein, whose methodical but affectionate pragmatism can be felt within every crevice of the Bakery. Goldstein is supported by a sizeable team of artists, musicians, teachers, curators, and contributors who make the venue’s round-the-clock activity possible. Goldstein says that her mother, who studied at the Atlanta College of Art and is playfully referred to as “the Muscle” of the operation,  continues to help supervise its daily operations. Most of the venue staff work as volunteers, for work exchange or barter, or simply because they enjoy what the Bakery has to offer.
“DIY doesn’t have to mean shitty, and it isn’t always just about doing everything yourself,” DeSimone says. “That comes with a lot of its own hang-ups, and the burnout fuel of thinking that you have a burden to shoulder by yourself. It’s about taking what you are and making it successful rather than trying to conform to someone else’s idea of success. I know this is badass, and I’m going to do everything I can to foster it until I either get crushed under the machine or win.”

Highlights for the Bakery's upcoming programming include Diane Cluck, Loudermilk and Moon, and Casey Hood on Sept. 3, Lupita’s Revenge: Shadow Puppet play with live music on Sept. 9, and the Turn Up/Turn Out Rock the Vote show featuring Little Tybee, Linqua Franqa, Loner, and more on Nov. 3.

Looking to the future, the Bakery will continue to expand the capacity of its performance spaces, while Goldstein, DeSimone, and the rest of the team work to incorporate new projects and experiments into the venue. “It’s a platform for events, a platform for the people, even a platform for me to learn how to run a business,” Goldstein says. “Everything that’s happened at the Bakery so far has been so positive that I’m just trusting in it to be whatever it is."

The Bakery is located at 825 Warner Street S.W. www.thebakeryatlanta.com."
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  string(7729) "Alien puppets, spaceship props, and a bioluminescent rainforest transformed the vibrantly painted warehouse into a distant planet, where extraterrestrial performers executed the fluid musical stagecraft of Joshua Loner’s intergalactic space-opera ''Celesthesia 1.5: Light Speed!'' The decorative installations were crafted with love by local artists and volunteers, each part recycled from materials left behind at a wedding the week before.

The hybrid musical-theatre performance illustrates the self-reliant and fiercely creative energy cultivated by the Bakery, a progressive, multi-use arts and music venue on Atlanta’s Southwest side.

On the cusp of Oakland City and the rapidly gentrifying Adair Park, [https://thebakeryatlanta.com/|the Bakery] sits between the Westside BeltLine Trail and the Aluma Farm. Slathered in hand-painted pastel murals and artful graffiti, the warehouse was once a functioning bakery in the ‘50s, ‘60s, and ‘70s, before housing secretive rave party hotspots CoLab and Kaleidoscape circa 2006-2016. Since founder and creative director Willow Goldstein and her mother, Olive Hagemeier, took over the space in October of 2017, she and a team of volunteers have shifted away from the building’s former rave affiliations and have developed the Bakery as a community center for DIY arts, music, and education.

Over the last year, like-minded independent gallery and venue spaces such as Mammal Gallery and Eyedrum have been forced out of their buildings, casualties of a wave of gentrification sweeping over South Downtown.

The Bakery is fighting to preserve legitimacy for community-based arts. “I have said it’s inherently DIY because my mom has taught me to just do everything ourselves my whole life,” Goldstein says. “I have been trying to recall when DIY, as an ethos, first entered my vocabulary, and it definitely is more recently. I'm certainly trying to run a business — not turn a profit necessarily — that balances DIY with more traditional operations because I want people to be paid and valued and sustained. I'm absolutely not working toward 501(3)(c) status because while we operate largely as a team with regular team/staff meetings, I still retain decision-making power,” she adds. “This is based on my past experience and frustrations with nonprofits.”
As an Eyedrum Art & Music Gallery board member, Goldstein's administrative and curatorial experiences have allowed her to continue building professional and friendly relationships with many of the artists and volunteers who now contribute to the Bakery. When she and her mother began focusing their energies on building up the Bakery and assembling a team of volunteers through social media and Craigslist ads, they were met by a flood of artists eager for a place to showcase their work.

Their efforts highlighted a dilemma: While there is an abundance of compelling art being created by Atlanta-based artists, there’s a lack of spaces in which it can be presented. “The caliber of artwork brought to a warehouse in this random location was surprising,” Goldstein says.

Goldstein handles art curation and community building. In the meantime, musical programming is overseen by fellow Eyedrum board member Daniel DeSimone, who also plays bass for local grindcore band Malevich. While DeSimone’s promotion company, [https://www.facebook.com/faceofknives/?ref=br_rs|Face of Knives Productions], focuses on heavy metal, post-rock, and abstract noise acts, he also books artists of all genres, ensuring that guests of the Bakery experience something new every time they return. “I’d rather throw a thousand genuine artists against our walls just to see what sticks rather than try to craft the most appealing lineup to the masses or some capitalist entity,” he says. “That way, even if a show is weird, at least I’ll know it’s going to be sick. It’s about curating valuable art from a revolving door of different people and building a genuine and positive environment around that.”

For Goldstein, keeping that door revolving means expanding programming to accommodate community gatherings and educational opportunities. This includes technology workshops with Streetcat.media’s Maggie Kane and art classes such as photography and life drawing.

The Bakery houses a handful of performance spaces, affording time and square-footage to host yoga classes, afternoon art and technology workshops, evening film screenings, and a full bill of musical performances to finish off the night. The venue even offers a small daytime coffee shop with snacks and drinks, where the staff of ''[http://plasmamag.com/|PLASMA Magazine]'' operates editorial meetings in exchange for people power and promotion for the Bakery’s events. A large team of multi-talented artists and media producers came to the Bakery in search of residency and workshop space, and many have found themselves organically folded into the team as their talents were needed for programming, curation, and the extra elbow grease required to maintain a DIY space.

Goldstein and DeSimone want everyone who comes to the Bakery to feel comfortable being who they are, as long as they are respectful. The building features a gender-neutral bathroom facility, and programming regularly promotes gender equality. The venue hosted the Southern Fried Queer Pride festival in June of this year. “If I am a gender nonconforming person, am I going to have to fight the battle that I have to fight every day of my life just to go see a show?” DeSimone says. “There should be a space where no one feels that they are going to be heckled by drunk people just for being different.”

Programming is overseen by Goldstein, whose methodical but affectionate pragmatism can be felt within every crevice of the Bakery. Goldstein is supported by a sizeable team of artists, musicians, teachers, curators, and contributors who make the venue’s round-the-clock activity possible. Goldstein says that her mother, who studied at the Atlanta College of Art and is playfully referred to as “the Muscle” of the operation,  continues to help supervise its daily operations. Most of the venue staff work as volunteers, for work exchange or barter, or simply because they enjoy what the Bakery has to offer.
“DIY doesn’t have to mean shitty, and it isn’t always just about doing everything yourself,” DeSimone says. “That comes with a lot of its own hang-ups, and the burnout fuel of thinking that you have a burden to shoulder by yourself. It’s about taking what you are and making it successful rather than trying to conform to someone else’s idea of success. I know this is badass, and I’m going to do everything I can to foster it until I either get crushed under the machine or win.”

Highlights for the Bakery's upcoming programming include Diane Cluck, Loudermilk and Moon, and Casey Hood on __Sept. 3__, Lupita’s Revenge: Shadow Puppet play with live music on __Sept. 9__, and the Turn Up/Turn Out Rock the Vote show featuring Little Tybee, Linqua Franqa, Loner, and more on __Nov. 3__.

Looking to the future, the Bakery will continue to expand the capacity of its performance spaces, while Goldstein, DeSimone, and the rest of the team work to incorporate new projects and experiments into the venue. “It’s a platform for events, a platform for the people, even a platform for me to learn how to run a business,” Goldstein says. “Everything that’s happened at the Bakery so far has been so positive that I’m just trusting in it to be whatever it is."

''[https://thebakeryatlanta.com/|The Bakery is located at 825 Warner Street S.W. www.thebakeryatlanta.com.]''"
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  string(8209) " The Bakery DSC 0873  2018-06-28T16:34:34+00:00 The_Bakery_DSC_0873.JPG     How the grass-roots gallery and venue cultivates community 6917  2018-08-27T19:00:00+00:00 The Bakery fosters homegrown creativity chad.radford@creativeloafing.com Chad Radford Alex Patton Alex Patton 2018-08-27T19:00:00+00:00  Alien puppets, spaceship props, and a bioluminescent rainforest transformed the vibrantly painted warehouse into a distant planet, where extraterrestrial performers executed the fluid musical stagecraft of Joshua Loner’s intergalactic space-opera Celesthesia 1.5: Light Speed! The decorative installations were crafted with love by local artists and volunteers, each part recycled from materials left behind at a wedding the week before.

The hybrid musical-theatre performance illustrates the self-reliant and fiercely creative energy cultivated by the Bakery, a progressive, multi-use arts and music venue on Atlanta’s Southwest side.

On the cusp of Oakland City and the rapidly gentrifying Adair Park, the Bakery sits between the Westside BeltLine Trail and the Aluma Farm. Slathered in hand-painted pastel murals and artful graffiti, the warehouse was once a functioning bakery in the ‘50s, ‘60s, and ‘70s, before housing secretive rave party hotspots CoLab and Kaleidoscape circa 2006-2016. Since founder and creative director Willow Goldstein and her mother, Olive Hagemeier, took over the space in October of 2017, she and a team of volunteers have shifted away from the building’s former rave affiliations and have developed the Bakery as a community center for DIY arts, music, and education.

Over the last year, like-minded independent gallery and venue spaces such as Mammal Gallery and Eyedrum have been forced out of their buildings, casualties of a wave of gentrification sweeping over South Downtown.

The Bakery is fighting to preserve legitimacy for community-based arts. “I have said it’s inherently DIY because my mom has taught me to just do everything ourselves my whole life,” Goldstein says. “I have been trying to recall when DIY, as an ethos, first entered my vocabulary, and it definitely is more recently. I'm certainly trying to run a business — not turn a profit necessarily — that balances DIY with more traditional operations because I want people to be paid and valued and sustained. I'm absolutely not working toward 501(3)(c) status because while we operate largely as a team with regular team/staff meetings, I still retain decision-making power,” she adds. “This is based on my past experience and frustrations with nonprofits.”
As an Eyedrum Art & Music Gallery board member, Goldstein's administrative and curatorial experiences have allowed her to continue building professional and friendly relationships with many of the artists and volunteers who now contribute to the Bakery. When she and her mother began focusing their energies on building up the Bakery and assembling a team of volunteers through social media and Craigslist ads, they were met by a flood of artists eager for a place to showcase their work.

Their efforts highlighted a dilemma: While there is an abundance of compelling art being created by Atlanta-based artists, there’s a lack of spaces in which it can be presented. “The caliber of artwork brought to a warehouse in this random location was surprising,” Goldstein says.

Goldstein handles art curation and community building. In the meantime, musical programming is overseen by fellow Eyedrum board member Daniel DeSimone, who also plays bass for local grindcore band Malevich. While DeSimone’s promotion company, Face of Knives Productions, focuses on heavy metal, post-rock, and abstract noise acts, he also books artists of all genres, ensuring that guests of the Bakery experience something new every time they return. “I’d rather throw a thousand genuine artists against our walls just to see what sticks rather than try to craft the most appealing lineup to the masses or some capitalist entity,” he says. “That way, even if a show is weird, at least I’ll know it’s going to be sick. It’s about curating valuable art from a revolving door of different people and building a genuine and positive environment around that.”

For Goldstein, keeping that door revolving means expanding programming to accommodate community gatherings and educational opportunities. This includes technology workshops with Streetcat.media’s Maggie Kane and art classes such as photography and life drawing.

The Bakery houses a handful of performance spaces, affording time and square-footage to host yoga classes, afternoon art and technology workshops, evening film screenings, and a full bill of musical performances to finish off the night. The venue even offers a small daytime coffee shop with snacks and drinks, where the staff of PLASMA Magazine operates editorial meetings in exchange for people power and promotion for the Bakery’s events. A large team of multi-talented artists and media producers came to the Bakery in search of residency and workshop space, and many have found themselves organically folded into the team as their talents were needed for programming, curation, and the extra elbow grease required to maintain a DIY space.

Goldstein and DeSimone want everyone who comes to the Bakery to feel comfortable being who they are, as long as they are respectful. The building features a gender-neutral bathroom facility, and programming regularly promotes gender equality. The venue hosted the Southern Fried Queer Pride festival in June of this year. “If I am a gender nonconforming person, am I going to have to fight the battle that I have to fight every day of my life just to go see a show?” DeSimone says. “There should be a space where no one feels that they are going to be heckled by drunk people just for being different.”

Programming is overseen by Goldstein, whose methodical but affectionate pragmatism can be felt within every crevice of the Bakery. Goldstein is supported by a sizeable team of artists, musicians, teachers, curators, and contributors who make the venue’s round-the-clock activity possible. Goldstein says that her mother, who studied at the Atlanta College of Art and is playfully referred to as “the Muscle” of the operation,  continues to help supervise its daily operations. Most of the venue staff work as volunteers, for work exchange or barter, or simply because they enjoy what the Bakery has to offer.
“DIY doesn’t have to mean shitty, and it isn’t always just about doing everything yourself,” DeSimone says. “That comes with a lot of its own hang-ups, and the burnout fuel of thinking that you have a burden to shoulder by yourself. It’s about taking what you are and making it successful rather than trying to conform to someone else’s idea of success. I know this is badass, and I’m going to do everything I can to foster it until I either get crushed under the machine or win.”

Highlights for the Bakery's upcoming programming include Diane Cluck, Loudermilk and Moon, and Casey Hood on Sept. 3, Lupita’s Revenge: Shadow Puppet play with live music on Sept. 9, and the Turn Up/Turn Out Rock the Vote show featuring Little Tybee, Linqua Franqa, Loner, and more on Nov. 3.

Looking to the future, the Bakery will continue to expand the capacity of its performance spaces, while Goldstein, DeSimone, and the rest of the team work to incorporate new projects and experiments into the venue. “It’s a platform for events, a platform for the people, even a platform for me to learn how to run a business,” Goldstein says. “Everything that’s happened at the Bakery so far has been so positive that I’m just trusting in it to be whatever it is."

The Bakery is located at 825 Warner Street S.W. www.thebakeryatlanta.com.    Bakie THE CREW: Willow Goldstein (from left), Pearl Bryant, Maggie Kane, Lev Omelchenko, Xenia Simos, Severiana Iocovozzi, Meredith Kooi, Olive Hagemeier, Mark "Q" Gilbert, Daniel DeSimone, and Jordan Neal are among the staff and volunteers who run the Bakery.                                   The Bakery fosters homegrown creativity "
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Article

Monday August 27, 2018 03:00 pm EDT
How the grass-roots gallery and venue cultivates community | more...