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Visual Arts

Visual Arts


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Tuesday July 10, 2018 05:00 am EDT
Produced in collaboration with the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia and opening on July 14, the exhibit aims to explore identity and bodily agency | more...
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Saturday July 7, 2018 05:00 am EDT
Lisa Shinault and Phoebe A. Maze put the pieces together in their brainchild exhibit at Galeria Regina opening on July 7 | more...
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  string(4567) "Normally when we hear of self-taught artists, we think of individuals who created their own aesthetic. These artists operated in relative isolation, outside the mainstream to express themselves using a variety of techniques and media. At The High Museum of Art’s latest exhibition: “Outliers and American Vanguard Art,” we learn self-taught artists tell a story about our country that breaks artistic traditions and cultural boundaries.

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The show features artworks that span over a century and range from paintings and sculpture to photographs and textiles that highlight the tenor and talent of American creativity and self expression.

In preparation of the exhibition opening, Creative Loafing spoke with Jentleson about self-taught artists and their lasting legacy. 

“Outliers and American Vanguard Art” opens Sunday, June 24 through September 30, 2018 at the High Museum of Art.

Creative Loafing: Why curate an exhibit like “Outliers”

Katie Jentleson: That's the term used in the show to describe  artists who have a distance from the mainstream in some way, in many cases  because they weren't trained, but also because they often had positions in society that were marginalized, whether it was because they were living in rural areas or because of cognitive diversity, meaning different kinds of experiences that are outside of what we would consider to be normal in terms of mental health. And then certainly in terms of class and race. These artists because of their skin color or social standing were traditionally underrepresented in the mainstream art world. 

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Outliers and American Vanguard Art. June 24 – September 30, 2018. Tickets available now at www.high.org.

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The show features artworks that span over a century and range from paintings and sculpture to photographs and textiles that highlight the tenor and talent of American creativity and self expression.

In preparation of the exhibition opening, Creative Loafing spoke with Jentleson about self-taught artists and their lasting legacy. 

“Outliers and American Vanguard Art” opens Sunday, June 24 through September 30, 2018 at the High Museum of Art.

Creative Loafing: Why curate an exhibit like “Outliers”

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Outliers and American Vanguard Art. June 24 – September 30, 2018. Tickets available now at www.high.org.

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Article

Friday June 29, 2018 11:00 am EDT
Normally when we hear of self-taught artists, we think of individuals who created their own aesthetic. These artists operated in relative isolation, outside the mainstream to express themselves using a variety of techniques and media. At The High Museum of Art’s latest exhibition: “Outliers and American Vanguard Art,” we learn self-taught artists tell a story about our country that breaks... | more...

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  string(1155) "Founded in 1989, Museum of Design Atlanta is the one and only museum in the Southeast dedicated to the study of design and is committed to furthering the understanding of design through its various exhibitions and programs for visitors of all ages. Now, guests have the opportunity to hear MODA Director of Development Aimee Chan-Lindquist speak on the museum’s rich history, background, programs, and future excursions. After her talk at the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library event space, attendees are invited to continue the evening with wine. cheese, and the opportunity to view MODA’s exhibition, Making Change: The Art and Craft of Activism. The exhibition explores craftivism, the worldwide movement that artists and activists are taking part in using traditional materials such as yarn, glue guns, quilt patterns, and creating art to protest social and political injustice. This event is free and requires no tickets or reservations so if you’re into design or activism, this one’s for you! 

Free. 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Wed., June 20. Peachtree Branch of the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System, 1315 Peachtree St. N.E. www.museumofdesign.org."
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''Free. 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Wed., June 20. Peachtree Branch of the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System, 1315 Peachtree St. N.E. www.museumofdesign.org.''"
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  string(1657) " Aimee Headshot (1)  2018-06-20T17:22:51+00:00 Aimee_Headshot_(1).jpg     MODA Director of Development shares a bit of history on June 20. 6710  2018-06-20T17:19:35+00:00 Get learnt with Aimee Chan-Lindquist laureneleathers@gmail.com Lauren Leathers Amy Strang  2018-06-20T17:19:35+00:00  Founded in 1989, Museum of Design Atlanta is the one and only museum in the Southeast dedicated to the study of design and is committed to furthering the understanding of design through its various exhibitions and programs for visitors of all ages. Now, guests have the opportunity to hear MODA Director of Development Aimee Chan-Lindquist speak on the museum’s rich history, background, programs, and future excursions. After her talk at the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library event space, attendees are invited to continue the evening with wine. cheese, and the opportunity to view MODA’s exhibition, Making Change: The Art and Craft of Activism. The exhibition explores craftivism, the worldwide movement that artists and activists are taking part in using traditional materials such as yarn, glue guns, quilt patterns, and creating art to protest social and political injustice. This event is free and requires no tickets or reservations so if you’re into design or activism, this one’s for you! 

Free. 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Wed., June 20. Peachtree Branch of the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System, 1315 Peachtree St. N.E. www.museumofdesign.org.    Maria Royal PICTURE PERFECT: Chan-Lindquist speak on the museum’s rich history, background, programs, and future excursions on June 20.                                   Get learnt with Aimee Chan-Lindquist "
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Wednesday June 20, 2018 01:19 pm EDT
MODA Director of Development shares a bit of history on June 20. | more...
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Thursday June 7, 2018 11:35 am EDT
Homegrown artists display empowering femme-inspired works on June 10 | more...
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  string(6875) "You won’t think you’re in Atlanta anymore. Whether you’re a hardcore raw foodie or just curious, you can step into a new world of afrocentric radical health at Wonderful Wizards of Raw - A Raw Food Extravaganza. Sample and purchase raw foods from local chefs, listen to the wisdom of keynote speakers, and enjoy the musical stylings by hostess Sheriese Nicole and DJ Grey. If you want even more raw magic, return sunday for film screenings and a wrap-up dance party! Kids welcome. Free. Sat., June 2, 1-7 p.m.; Sun., June 3, 1-7 p.m. Tassili’s Raw Reality, 1059 Ralph David Abernathy Blvd. S.W. www.tassilisrawreality.com.


Do you enjoy comedy improv? What about carefully crafted, time-honored plays? Well come one, come all, because The Actor’s Worst Nightmare half-asses both! Watch two actors perform two different plays, and throw an improviser in the mix while they’re at it. The object: to make a story out of the mess. Whether you enjoy watching performers squirm under pressure, or are captivated by the power of quick thinking and creativity to turn nonsense into art, you are guaranteed to be entertained. Pay as little as $7 for a one-hour show, and you’ll have the option to stay for another free of charge! $7-10. 8-9 p.m. Fri., June 1.-Sat., June 2. Highwire Comedy Co., 451 Bishop St N.W. http://www.highwirecomedy.com.


If an artsy, indie vibe is more your speed, don’t miss out on the Summer Indie Craft Experience 2018. Swag bags, fun activities with the Atlanta Library, local food, and musical stylings by DJ Zano are just the sprinkles on top of the over 135 craft and vintage vendors who will be selling their wares. Kids get in free, and the Five Points MARTA station is in walking distance of the venue. If you are an etsy addict, aspiring artist, or just want to get to know more about Atlanta’s artists and crafters, this is so worth the $5. $5. 11-6 p.m. Sat., June 2.-Sun., June 3. Georgia Freight Depot, 65 M.L.K. Jr. Dr. S.E. http://www.ice-atlanta.com. 


Need to use all that useless Atlanta trivia that’s been cluttering your brain for years? Looking to make new friends, enjoy drinks, and prove your status as a true ATLien? Tired of rhetorical statements used to convince you doing something is a good idea? If you answered yes to at least two of the above questions, then the return of Are You An ATLien Trivia should pique your interest. Assemble your team and test your knowledge of obscure ATL history and culture to secure bragging rights and the illustrious mystery prize. Shots are $3, because if anything helps in recalling information it’s alcohol. $5. 5:30-9 p.m. Sun., June 3. WERD Studio, 54 Hilliard St. N.E. https://www.facebook.com/events/1979285272388033. 


Are you itching to do something completely new this weekend, but also really need to relax? Chances are Reel Paddling Film Festival will sate your need for chill adventurism. Come out to see serene wilderness and wild rivers without having to leave behind air conditioning! Or, get inspired for your next extreme paddling trip. All proceeds will be going to Paddle4Tomorrow, an organization dedicated to fostering appreciation and respect in youth for nature and others. What’s more? You’ll get a free, locally crafted beer! $22. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Sun., June 3. Westbrook Supply Co., 1240 Chattahoochee Ave. N.W. Suite J. https://www.paddle4tomorrow.org. 

For those with a more sophisticated palette, Atlanta Food and Wine Festival is back all weekend. For $100, connoisseurs will be able to participate in unlimited tastings of the south’s best wine, beer, and spirits, as well as bites from award-winning Atlanta chefs. If you have not yet registered for this opportunity to be swept into a world of flavor, be swift! Saturday is already sold out, and Friday and Sunday are going fast! $100. Fri., June 1, 7:30-10:30 p.m.; Sun., June 3., 1:30-4:30 p.m. Midtown, 1000 Marietta St., Suite 108. https://atlfoodandwinefestival.com.


Atlanta’s first alternative newspaper, The Great Speckled Bird, covered issues of racial justice, women’s rights, gay liberation, and anti-war sentiments when no other Georgia newspaper was doing it. Now, it’s 50 years later and we’re still fighting the same battles. In honor of the 50th anniversary of Atlanta’s second most important newspaper, The 50th Anniversary Celebration of The Great Speckled Bird will be kicking off Saturday at 4 p.m. Featuring Democracy Now lead anchor Amy Goodman, senior writer for Splinter News Hamilton Nolan, music from Sing Out Defiance, and a panel discussing media then and now led by Bird veterans. With local progressive grassroots organizations picking up steam since the election, swing by for a chance to gain some insight and knowledge about the radical, anti-establishment movements that happened right here in The Peach City. $10-$12. 4-9 p.m. Sat., June 2. Chosewood Ballroom, 420 McDonough Ave. www.library.gsu.edu/GSB50. 


Get your Fast & Furious kicks in a safe, non-illegal street race environment at the 2018 Georgia Street Rod Show Hosted by GSRA (Georgia Street Rod Association) this show celebrates cars and bikes of all varieties, including specalitty custom vehicles you won't be able to find anywhere else. Proceeds from the event will go to helping Honor Flight, a non-profit dedicated to helping veterans find closure by visiting monuments dedicated to their sacrifice. Prizes will be given out, food will be eaten, and music will be listened to so even if you’re too young to see above the steering wheel it shouldn’t be hard to find something to do. $20. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., June 2. Summit Racing Equipment, 20 King Mill Road, McDonough. https://gsra.wildapricot.org.

Joyner Lucas at The Loft Known for his controversial “I’m Not Racist” music video tackling issues of race in today’s polarized political climate, rapper Joyner Lucas makes a stop at The Loft for his I’m Kind Of A Big Deal tour. Born and raised in Worcester, Massachusetts, Lucas has always found passion in listening and creating music that speaks to his own experience and issues plaguing society today. $20. 8-11 p.m. Sun., June 3. Center Stage - The Loft - Vinyl 1374 W. Peachtree St. N.W. http://www.centerstage-atlanta.com/shows/the-loft. 


Have you ever dreamt about drinking while painting erotic masterpieces in the back of a tattoo parlor? Bring your wildest fantasies to life with Tipsy Topics & Texture’s Paint Your Pleasure. Perfect for a carefree girl’s night out or a sexy date, Black Ink Atlanta is graciously providing space for @SassyFierce to teach Atlanta’s most stimulating painting class. Light food and drink will be provided for purchase. Come on over for a good time. $35-$75. 8:00-11:00 p.m. Sat., June 2. Black Ink Atlanta, 2989 North Fulton Dr. https://www.tipsytopicstextures.com."
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Do you enjoy comedy improv? What about carefully crafted, time-honored plays? Well come one, come all, because __The Actor’s Worst Nightmare____ __half-asses both! Watch two actors perform two different plays, and throw an improviser in the mix while they’re at it. The object: to make a story out of the mess. Whether you enjoy watching performers squirm under pressure, or are captivated by the power of quick thinking and creativity to turn nonsense into art, you are guaranteed to be entertained. Pay as little as $7 for a one-hour show, and you’ll have the option to stay for another free of charge! ''$7-10. 8-9 p.m. Fri., June 1.-Sat., June 2. Highwire Comedy Co., 451 Bishop St N.W. [http://www.highwirecomedy.com/|http://www.highwirecomedy.com].''


If an artsy, indie vibe is more your speed, don’t miss out on the __Summer Indie Craft Experience 2018.__ Swag bags, fun activities with the Atlanta Library, local food, and musical stylings by DJ Zano are just the sprinkles on top of the over 135 craft and vintage vendors who will be selling their wares. Kids get in free, and the Five Points MARTA station is in walking distance of the venue. If you are an etsy addict, aspiring artist, or just want to get to know more about Atlanta’s artists and crafters, this is so worth the $5. ''$5. 11-6 p.m. Sat., June 2.-Sun., June 3. Georgia Freight Depot, 65 M.L.K. Jr. Dr. S.E. [http://www.ice-atlanta.com/|http://www.ice-atlanta.com]. ''


Need to use all that useless Atlanta trivia that’s been cluttering your brain for years? Looking to make new friends, enjoy drinks, and prove your status as a true ATLien? Tired of rhetorical statements used to convince you doing something is a good idea? If you answered yes to at least two of the above questions, then the return of __Are You An ATLien Trivia __should pique your interest. Assemble your team and test your knowledge of obscure ATL history and culture to secure bragging rights and the illustrious mystery prize. Shots are $3, because if anything helps in recalling information it’s alcohol. ''$5. 5:30-9 p.m. Sun., June 3. WERD Studio, 54 Hilliard St. N.E. [https://www.facebook.com/events/1979285272388033]. ''


Are you itching to do something completely new this weekend, but also really'' ''need to relax? Chances are __Reel Paddling Film Festival____ __will sate your need for chill adventurism. Come out to see serene wilderness and wild rivers without having to leave behind air conditioning! Or, get inspired for your next extreme paddling trip. All proceeds will be going to Paddle4Tomorrow, an organization dedicated to fostering appreciation and respect in youth for nature and others. What’s more? You’ll get a free, locally crafted beer! ''$22. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Sun., June 3. Westbrook Supply Co., 1240 Chattahoochee Ave. N.W. Suite J. [https://www.paddle4tomorrow.org/|https://www.paddle4tomorrow.org]. ''

For those with a more sophisticated palette, __Atlanta Food and Wine Festival____ __is back all weekend. For $100, connoisseurs will be able to participate in unlimited tastings of the south’s best wine, beer, and spirits, as well as bites from award-winning Atlanta chefs. If you have not yet registered for this opportunity to be swept into a world of flavor, be swift! Saturday is already sold out, and Friday and Sunday are going fast! ''$100. Fri., June 1, 7:30-10:30 p.m.; Sun., June 3., 1:30-4:30 p.m. Midtown, 1000 Marietta St., Suite 108. [https://atlfoodandwinefestival.com/|https://atlfoodandwinefestival.com].''


Atlanta’s first alternative newspaper, ''The Great Speckled Bird'', covered issues of racial justice, women’s rights, gay liberation, and anti-war sentiments when no other Georgia newspaper was doing it. Now, it’s 50 years later and we’re still fighting the same battles. In honor of the 50th anniversary of Atlanta’s second most important newspaper, __The 50th Anniversary Celebration of The Great Speckled Bird____ __will be kicking off Saturday at 4 p.m. Featuring Democracy Now lead anchor Amy Goodman, senior writer for Splinter News Hamilton Nolan, music from Sing Out Defiance, and a panel discussing media then and now led by ''Bird'' veterans. With local progressive grassroots organizations picking up steam since the election, swing by for a chance to gain some insight and knowledge about the radical, anti-establishment movements that happened right here in The Peach City. ''$10-$12. 4-9 p.m. Sat., June 2. Chosewood Ballroom, 420 McDonough Ave. [http://www.library.gsu.edu/GSB50|www.library.gsu.edu/GSB50]. ''


Get your Fast & Furious kicks in a safe, non-illegal street race environment at the __2018 Georgia Street Rod Show__ Hosted by GSRA (Georgia Street Rod Association) this show celebrates cars and bikes of all varieties, including specalitty custom vehicles you won't be able to find anywhere else. Proceeds from the event will go to helping Honor Flight, a non-profit dedicated to helping veterans find closure by visiting monuments dedicated to their sacrifice. Prizes will be given out, food will be eaten, and music will be listened to so even if you’re too young to see above the steering wheel it shouldn’t be hard to find something to do. ''$20. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., June 2. Summit Racing Equipment, 20 King Mill Road, McDonough. [https://gsra.wildapricot.org/|https://gsra.wildapricot.org].''

__Joyner Lucas at The Loft____ __Known for his controversial “I’m Not Racist” music video tackling issues of race in today’s polarized political climate, rapper Joyner Lucas makes a stop at The Loft for his ''I’m Kind Of A Big Deal ''tour. Born and raised in Worcester, Massachusetts, Lucas has always found passion in listening and creating music that speaks to his own experience and issues plaguing society today. ''$20. 8-11 p.m. Sun., June 3. Center Stage - The Loft - Vinyl 1374 W. Peachtree St. N.W. [http://www.centerstage-atlanta.com/shows/the-loft/|http://www.centerstage-atlanta.com/shows/the-loft]. ''


Have you ever dreamt about drinking while painting erotic masterpieces in the back of a tattoo parlor? Bring your wildest fantasies to life with Tipsy Topics & Texture’s __Paint Your Pleasure.__ Perfect for a carefree girl’s night out or a sexy date, Black Ink Atlanta is graciously providing space for @SassyFierce to teach Atlanta’s most stimulating painting class. Light food and drink will be provided for purchase. Come on over for a good time. ''$35-$75. 8:00-11:00 p.m. Sat., June 2. Black Ink Atlanta, 2989 North Fulton Dr. [https://www.tipsytopicstextures.com/|https://www.tipsytopicstextures.com].''"
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  string(7479) " Indie Craft Experience 2  2018-06-02T00:09:44+00:00 Indie_Craft_Experience_2.jpg     PLUS: Tipsy Topics and Textures host an erotic painting party, rapper Joyner Lucas comes to town, and more 6107  2018-06-01T09:02:00+00:00 Welcome warmer weather at the Summer Indie Craft Experience market laureneleathers@gmail.com Lauren Leathers Jessica Struempf, Jake Van Valkenburg, and Mathew Shankute  2018-06-01T09:02:00+00:00  You won’t think you’re in Atlanta anymore. Whether you’re a hardcore raw foodie or just curious, you can step into a new world of afrocentric radical health at Wonderful Wizards of Raw - A Raw Food Extravaganza. Sample and purchase raw foods from local chefs, listen to the wisdom of keynote speakers, and enjoy the musical stylings by hostess Sheriese Nicole and DJ Grey. If you want even more raw magic, return sunday for film screenings and a wrap-up dance party! Kids welcome. Free. Sat., June 2, 1-7 p.m.; Sun., June 3, 1-7 p.m. Tassili’s Raw Reality, 1059 Ralph David Abernathy Blvd. S.W. www.tassilisrawreality.com.


Do you enjoy comedy improv? What about carefully crafted, time-honored plays? Well come one, come all, because The Actor’s Worst Nightmare half-asses both! Watch two actors perform two different plays, and throw an improviser in the mix while they’re at it. The object: to make a story out of the mess. Whether you enjoy watching performers squirm under pressure, or are captivated by the power of quick thinking and creativity to turn nonsense into art, you are guaranteed to be entertained. Pay as little as $7 for a one-hour show, and you’ll have the option to stay for another free of charge! $7-10. 8-9 p.m. Fri., June 1.-Sat., June 2. Highwire Comedy Co., 451 Bishop St N.W. http://www.highwirecomedy.com.


If an artsy, indie vibe is more your speed, don’t miss out on the Summer Indie Craft Experience 2018. Swag bags, fun activities with the Atlanta Library, local food, and musical stylings by DJ Zano are just the sprinkles on top of the over 135 craft and vintage vendors who will be selling their wares. Kids get in free, and the Five Points MARTA station is in walking distance of the venue. If you are an etsy addict, aspiring artist, or just want to get to know more about Atlanta’s artists and crafters, this is so worth the $5. $5. 11-6 p.m. Sat., June 2.-Sun., June 3. Georgia Freight Depot, 65 M.L.K. Jr. Dr. S.E. http://www.ice-atlanta.com. 


Need to use all that useless Atlanta trivia that’s been cluttering your brain for years? Looking to make new friends, enjoy drinks, and prove your status as a true ATLien? Tired of rhetorical statements used to convince you doing something is a good idea? If you answered yes to at least two of the above questions, then the return of Are You An ATLien Trivia should pique your interest. Assemble your team and test your knowledge of obscure ATL history and culture to secure bragging rights and the illustrious mystery prize. Shots are $3, because if anything helps in recalling information it’s alcohol. $5. 5:30-9 p.m. Sun., June 3. WERD Studio, 54 Hilliard St. N.E. https://www.facebook.com/events/1979285272388033. 


Are you itching to do something completely new this weekend, but also really need to relax? Chances are Reel Paddling Film Festival will sate your need for chill adventurism. Come out to see serene wilderness and wild rivers without having to leave behind air conditioning! Or, get inspired for your next extreme paddling trip. All proceeds will be going to Paddle4Tomorrow, an organization dedicated to fostering appreciation and respect in youth for nature and others. What’s more? You’ll get a free, locally crafted beer! $22. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Sun., June 3. Westbrook Supply Co., 1240 Chattahoochee Ave. N.W. Suite J. https://www.paddle4tomorrow.org. 

For those with a more sophisticated palette, Atlanta Food and Wine Festival is back all weekend. For $100, connoisseurs will be able to participate in unlimited tastings of the south’s best wine, beer, and spirits, as well as bites from award-winning Atlanta chefs. If you have not yet registered for this opportunity to be swept into a world of flavor, be swift! Saturday is already sold out, and Friday and Sunday are going fast! $100. Fri., June 1, 7:30-10:30 p.m.; Sun., June 3., 1:30-4:30 p.m. Midtown, 1000 Marietta St., Suite 108. https://atlfoodandwinefestival.com.


Atlanta’s first alternative newspaper, The Great Speckled Bird, covered issues of racial justice, women’s rights, gay liberation, and anti-war sentiments when no other Georgia newspaper was doing it. Now, it’s 50 years later and we’re still fighting the same battles. In honor of the 50th anniversary of Atlanta’s second most important newspaper, The 50th Anniversary Celebration of The Great Speckled Bird will be kicking off Saturday at 4 p.m. Featuring Democracy Now lead anchor Amy Goodman, senior writer for Splinter News Hamilton Nolan, music from Sing Out Defiance, and a panel discussing media then and now led by Bird veterans. With local progressive grassroots organizations picking up steam since the election, swing by for a chance to gain some insight and knowledge about the radical, anti-establishment movements that happened right here in The Peach City. $10-$12. 4-9 p.m. Sat., June 2. Chosewood Ballroom, 420 McDonough Ave. www.library.gsu.edu/GSB50. 


Get your Fast & Furious kicks in a safe, non-illegal street race environment at the 2018 Georgia Street Rod Show Hosted by GSRA (Georgia Street Rod Association) this show celebrates cars and bikes of all varieties, including specalitty custom vehicles you won't be able to find anywhere else. Proceeds from the event will go to helping Honor Flight, a non-profit dedicated to helping veterans find closure by visiting monuments dedicated to their sacrifice. Prizes will be given out, food will be eaten, and music will be listened to so even if you’re too young to see above the steering wheel it shouldn’t be hard to find something to do. $20. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., June 2. Summit Racing Equipment, 20 King Mill Road, McDonough. https://gsra.wildapricot.org.

Joyner Lucas at The Loft Known for his controversial “I’m Not Racist” music video tackling issues of race in today’s polarized political climate, rapper Joyner Lucas makes a stop at The Loft for his I’m Kind Of A Big Deal tour. Born and raised in Worcester, Massachusetts, Lucas has always found passion in listening and creating music that speaks to his own experience and issues plaguing society today. $20. 8-11 p.m. Sun., June 3. Center Stage - The Loft - Vinyl 1374 W. Peachtree St. N.W. http://www.centerstage-atlanta.com/shows/the-loft. 


Have you ever dreamt about drinking while painting erotic masterpieces in the back of a tattoo parlor? Bring your wildest fantasies to life with Tipsy Topics & Texture’s Paint Your Pleasure. Perfect for a carefree girl’s night out or a sexy date, Black Ink Atlanta is graciously providing space for @SassyFierce to teach Atlanta’s most stimulating painting class. Light food and drink will be provided for purchase. Come on over for a good time. $35-$75. 8:00-11:00 p.m. Sat., June 2. Black Ink Atlanta, 2989 North Fulton Dr. https://www.tipsytopicstextures.com.    Bonnie J. Heath Photography SUMMER SHOPPING: Shop local arts all weekend long                                   Welcome warmer weather at the Summer Indie Craft Experience market "
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Friday June 1, 2018 05:02 am EDT
PLUS: Tipsy Topics and Textures host an erotic painting party, rapper Joyner Lucas comes to town, and more | more...
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  string(71) "Explore a classic exhibition through July 8 at the Woodruff Arts Center"
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  string(1078) "Pooh, Piglet, and other pals guide audience members of all ages on a joyride of wild adventures. A.A. Milne’s playful tale, Winnie-The-Pooh, has popped off the page since 1926, and now the beloved characters are literally being brought to life. The High Museum and Alliance Theatre present their fourth born child, a collab exhibit and theatrical production based on the memorable characters that warmed our childhood hearts. Original sketches and vintage memorabilia in combination with a hilarious live performance remind friends and families that the smallest gestures can make the biggest difference. The exhibit will run through September 2, but the multidimensional journey of the Alliance Theatre, layered with hijinks and problem-solving, will run through July 8. Whether it be making new memories or reminiscing on your childhood, the Woodruff Arts Center’s got you covered with this timeless classic.


$5-$15. Various times. Thurs.-Sun., June 7-July 8. Rich Theatre at the Woodruff Arts Center, 1280 W. Peachtree St. N.E. www.alliancetheatre.org. 404-733-4650."
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  string(1147) "Pooh, Piglet, and other pals guide audience members of all ages on a joyride of wild adventures. A.A. Milne’s playful tale, Winnie-The-Pooh, has popped off the page since 1926, and now the beloved characters are literally being brought to life. The High Museum and Alliance Theatre present their fourth born child, a collab exhibit and theatrical production based on the memorable characters that warmed our childhood hearts. Original sketches and vintage memorabilia in combination with a hilarious live performance remind friends and families that the smallest gestures can make the biggest difference. The exhibit will run through September 2, but the multidimensional journey of the Alliance Theatre, layered with hijinks and problem-solving, will run through July 8. Whether it be making new memories or reminiscing on your childhood, the Woodruff Arts Center’s got you covered with this timeless classic.


''$5-$15. Various times. Thurs.-Sun., June 7-July 8. Rich Theatre at the Woodruff Arts Center, 1280 W. Peachtree St. N.E. www.[https://alliancetheatre.org/production/2018-19/winnie-the-pooh|alliancetheatre.org]. 404-733-4650.''"
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  string(1572) " Winnie The Pooh  2018-05-30T15:49:37+00:00 Winnie-the-Pooh.jpeg     Explore a classic exhibition through July 8 at the Woodruff Arts Center 6033  2018-05-30T15:48:19+00:00 Winnie-the-Pooh brings back memories laureneleathers@gmail.com Lauren Leathers Lily Guthrie   2018-05-30T15:48:19+00:00  Pooh, Piglet, and other pals guide audience members of all ages on a joyride of wild adventures. A.A. Milne’s playful tale, Winnie-The-Pooh, has popped off the page since 1926, and now the beloved characters are literally being brought to life. The High Museum and Alliance Theatre present their fourth born child, a collab exhibit and theatrical production based on the memorable characters that warmed our childhood hearts. Original sketches and vintage memorabilia in combination with a hilarious live performance remind friends and families that the smallest gestures can make the biggest difference. The exhibit will run through September 2, but the multidimensional journey of the Alliance Theatre, layered with hijinks and problem-solving, will run through July 8. Whether it be making new memories or reminiscing on your childhood, the Woodruff Arts Center’s got you covered with this timeless classic.


$5-$15. Various times. Thurs.-Sun., June 7-July 8. Rich Theatre at the Woodruff Arts Center, 1280 W. Peachtree St. N.E. www.alliancetheatre.org. 404-733-4650.    A’riel Tinter OH BOTHER: The first day of rehearsals for the Alliance Theatre’s 2018/2019 production of Winnie-the-Pooh.                                   Winnie-the-Pooh brings back memories "
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Article

Wednesday May 30, 2018 11:48 am EDT
Explore a classic exhibition through July 8 at the Woodruff Arts Center | more...
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Peter Street Station is an artistic community center, gallery and coffee house in Castleberry Hills. Legendary City of Ink co-founder and tattoo artist Miya Bailey manifested it as another hub in the local art community, which shines through in the works cultivated in the parlor. The space offers free art classes, private studios and a gallery with rotating exhibitions. This closing party for “City of Ink 11: Expression,” which is celebrating its 11th anniversary, will feature live performances by jazz collective Visitors, denim-wearing, house-heavy rapper Hommeboy, and a closing set by DJ Genesis. This is the last chance to check out an eclectic display of paintings by artists from the tattoo shop and the local community.

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Article

Wednesday April 4, 2018 10:17 pm EDT
The community art hub’s 11th anniversary party comes to an end | more...
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For some inexplicable reason, the presence of flowers creates an inviting and emotional environment. Flowers provide a sense of happiness, even if only temporary, and this idea is what prompted Project Bloom ATL.

Amanda Lankford is a local floral designer who has been beautifying local and iconic places in Atlanta with a method she refers to as ‘floral tagging.’ The ornamentations created by #projectbloomatl are not permanent, mirroring our constantly changing natural environment, and, depending on people’s use of the flowers, the display may last from a couple of days to several weeks. The next floral tagging will occur late this March.

Along with her team at Amanda Jewel Floral + Design, Lankford has already embellished multiple locations around metro Atlanta. The bronze couple in George Lundeen’s “Valentine” sculpture at Decatur Square, when adorned by colorful flowers, provided an even stronger sentiment of love. This statue holds personal significance for Lankford, as it was where she photographed her first bouquets, launching her floral business.

More floral tagging occurred in Krog Street Tunnel, specifically in the area surrounding Tiny Door #1 of Tiny Doors ATL. The alluring, giant bouquet served as a reminder of beauty to those that strolled by and encouraged people to admire other local art projects.

Additionally, Jackson Street Bridge was embellished with a Pride flag made up of carnations, accompanied by a message that read “We’re all the colors, all the sexes, all the genders. Infinite people. Infinite colors.” Many witnesses have commented on social media how these flowers had brightened their day, reaffirming Lankford’s reason for starting the project in the first place.

Join Lankford on her next flowering fun expedition by following @amandajewelfloraldesign on Instagram or using the hashtag #projectbloomatl. Details on upcoming floral tagging destinations are usually posted only a few hours before, so stay tuned!

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Article

Saturday March 10, 2018 09:54 am EST
A local’s contribution towards urban beautification | more...
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Curators AD “Kaya” Clark and Ralph “rEN” Dillard present an original artistic perspective at South Fulton Arts Center’s latest showing, Hood Alchemy. The exhibition revolves around the philosophical and metaphysical practice of alchemy as seen through the lens of  “the hood” or Black experience. It illustrates African-American practices such as graffiti, jazz, and hip-hop through photographic poetry. The show will feature 15 to 20 different Atlanta photographers. The opening reception will occur on Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. at the South Fulton Arts Center. Revel in the sights of unique concepts by local photographers in a highly distinctive presentation.

Free. Sat., Feb. 24-Sat., Apr. 21. 1-6 p.m. South Fulton Arts Center, 4645 Butner Road College Park, Ga. 30349. 404-612-3087. www/fultonarts.org.




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Curators AD “Kaya” Clark and Ralph “rEN” Dillard present an original artistic perspective at South Fulton Arts Center’s latest showing, Hood Alchemy. The exhibition revolves around the philosophical and metaphysical practice of alchemy as seen through the lens of  “the hood” or Black experience. It illustrates African-American practices such as graffiti, jazz, and hip-hop through photographic poetry. The show will feature 15 to 20 different Atlanta photographers. The opening reception will occur on Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. at the South Fulton Arts Center. Revel in the sights of unique concepts by local photographers in a highly distinctive presentation.

''Free. Sat., Feb. 24-Sat., Apr. 21. 1-6 p.m. South Fulton Arts Center, 4645 Butner Road College Park, Ga. 30349. 404-612-3087. www/fultonarts.org.''

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  string(1298) "    Photographic poetry comes to life at the Hood Alchemy Exhibition.    2018-02-20T10:00:00+00:00 SEE & DO: Hood Alchemy Exhibition laureneleathers@gmail.com Lauren Leathers Crysta Jones  2018-02-20T10:00:00+00:00  The exhibition revolves around the philosophical and metaphysical practice of alchemy as seen through the lens of “the hood” or Black experience.AD “Kaya” Clark<!]}%-->


Curators AD “Kaya” Clark and Ralph “rEN” Dillard present an original artistic perspective at South Fulton Arts Center’s latest showing, Hood Alchemy. The exhibition revolves around the philosophical and metaphysical practice of alchemy as seen through the lens of  “the hood” or Black experience. It illustrates African-American practices such as graffiti, jazz, and hip-hop through photographic poetry. The show will feature 15 to 20 different Atlanta photographers. The opening reception will occur on Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. at the South Fulton Arts Center. Revel in the sights of unique concepts by local photographers in a highly distinctive presentation.

Free. Sat., Feb. 24-Sat., Apr. 21. 1-6 p.m. South Fulton Arts Center, 4645 Butner Road College Park, Ga. 30349. 404-612-3087. www/fultonarts.org.




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Tuesday February 20, 2018 05:00 am EST
Photographic poetry comes to life at the Hood Alchemy Exhibition.  | more...
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  string(6552) "Most promotional merchandise ends up in the garbage, unless Lincoln Bilancia gets his hands on it. In 2008, a client shipped its branded swag to the marketing company where Bilancia worked, and perhaps fatefully, the smiley face stress toys had been earmarked for the trash. Bilancia took the toys and began transforming them into sculptures that tell stories from the Old Testament, recount Greek myths and fairy tales, and pay tribute to legendary artists and musicians. He needed an outlet during the dissolving marriage that brought him to Atlanta from New York City. “I would have gone crazy otherwise,” he says.

Over the course of eight years, he has incorporated at least 300 of the dolls into 190 total sculptures that cover his Grant Park home. On the mantle, Rapunzel peers from her tower at the bloody prince who fell from her artificial braid. (The following pennant is tacked to the top: “Miss Rapunzel’s Weaves, Wigs, & Extensions.”) David Bowie soars on a flying carpet near the pots and pans, and Jackson Pollock flicks a paintbrush toward Bilancia’s books. In lieu of antique family plates, the china cabinet teems with dozens of grinning figurines. And yet the neighbors have no idea the house with a smiley face flag whipping in the wind doubles as a museum.

Bilancia grew up drawing and painting under the influence of his grandmother, who at one time owned an art supply store in Queens, and he still uses the inherited leftover stock from when the shop closed. He studied traditional painting at the Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts but didn’t dabble in sculpture until the smileys arrived at the office. “They were crying out for something to be done to them,” he says.

The first piece Bilancia completed — a smiley ripping off its head — involved few props, but over time the figures became more complex with random household items. Groucho Marx's hair consists of crinkly black packing paper; Marvin the Martian's pistol is a screw; in the Psycho stabbing, the shower curtain is represented by a white, corrugated FedEx envelope and Norman Bates' robe, a fragment from a plaid dress Bilancia's niece had outgrown. "It ain't Michelangelo's materials," he says.

When Bilancia's co-workers found out about his obsession, they began bringing him possible accessories, like a ceramic sheep that inspired the Little Bo Peep sculpture and a plastic couch brandished with an antidepressant manufacturer's logo that, once covered with purple velvet fabric, became Sigmund Freud's sofa. Recently, Bilancia's girlfriend discarded a pair of leather boots that he repurposed into Joey Ramone's motorcycle jacket.

Certain people in Bilancia's life have driven the genesis of smileys as well, such as the "Squeal Like a Pig" vignette from Deliverance. More visually transfixing than the violated polyethylene foam ball with flailing arms and legs is a smiley in a tiny rocking chair strumming "Dueling Banjos" — a shout-out to Eric Weissberg, Bilancia's former neighbor who played the solo in the movie's famous theme. "The Jewish kid from New York was a phenomenal bluegrass musician," he says.

The smileys not only entertain but also provide lessons in history and pop culture: anything from Genghis Khan to Travis Bickle, from Gandhi to Walter White. Sporting miniscule versions of the Heisenberg hat, sunglasses, and brown mustache and beard, the "Breaking Bad" smiley clutches a sandwich bag of meth. "It was actually from my ex-wife's blue cosmetic case," Bilancia says, laughing. "I took great pleasure smashing it into tiny 'crystals.'"



    
                            

                    JOEFF DAVIS                            “Jackson Pollock”                
                            

                    JOEFF DAVIS                            “‘Psycho’ Shower Scene”                
                            

                    JOEFF DAVIS                            “Lascaux cave”            

Bilancia exhaustively records his brainstorming and creation process. "Because I'm a pack rat and in case someone ever challenges my ideas," he says. A thick notebook contains a pencil sketch of the Bride of Frankenstein to gauge the feasibility of his design, a copy of the story of Perseus and Medusa to provide a reference, and photos to document the transformation of a miniature plastic Escalade to a convertible for the Kennedy assassination scene. He currently is reproducing Lascaux, a network of caves in France covered in 17,300-year-old paintings. After he constructed the cave out of a steel banding frame, mesh, fiber glass, and spackle, Bilancia's cat Remy mistook it for a bed. (He added a picture of Remy sleeping in her new hut along with printouts of actual cave art to his notebook.) However, instead of Paleolithic animals, the art in Bilancia's cave consists of smiley silhouettes suspending arrows and spears above their heads. A battery-powered fire pit lights the sculpture from inside as a smiley caveman donning a crude fur vest grips a paint can, pausing to survey his work. Bilancia can whip together a simple sculpture in two hours, but the Lascaux piece will end up consuming several weeks.

Less than 60 stress toys remain in Bilancia's supply, and additional smileys that match his original stockpile have been difficult to find. In an effort to restock in advance, he has ordered samples from a couple of merchandising companies, but the eyes are too small or the lips are too thin. In fact, he used one misshapen sample in the Deliverance piece. "It looks like a weird-lookin' simpleton, so that became the banjo-playing kid," Bilancia says.

One might wonder what message Bilancia intends to convey by placing smileys in traumatizing situations while their faces remain plastered with shit-eating grins. Jesus beams during the Crucifixion; John F. Kennedy takes a bullet with pleasure; Kurt Cobain simpers in a pool of blood that has splattered the wee Melvins, Sonic Youth, and Bikini Kill posters on equally crimsoned walls. Bilancia means no disrespect but instead aims to encapsulate the indomitable human spirit. "No matter what you do to them, they're still smiling away," Bilancia says. "They're resilient little bastards. We all should be more like smileys."

Bilancia probably is right. Think about it: If someone squeezed the hell out of a smiley stress toy, its joyful expression wouldn't just remain. It would expand.

To contact Bilancia regarding his work, email lincolnbilancia@gmail.com."
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Over the course of eight years, he has incorporated at least 300 of the dolls into 190 total sculptures that cover his Grant Park home. On the mantle, Rapunzel peers from her tower at the bloody prince who fell from her artificial braid. (The following pennant is tacked to the top: “Miss Rapunzel’s Weaves, Wigs, & Extensions.”) David Bowie soars on a flying carpet near the pots and pans, and Jackson Pollock flicks a paintbrush toward Bilancia’s books. In lieu of antique family plates, the china cabinet teems with dozens of grinning figurines. And yet the neighbors have no idea the house with a smiley face flag whipping in the wind doubles as a museum.

Bilancia grew up drawing and painting under the influence of his grandmother, who at one time owned an art supply store in Queens, and he still uses the inherited leftover stock from when the shop closed. He studied traditional painting at the Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts but didn’t dabble in sculpture until the smileys arrived at the office. “They were crying out for something to be done to them,” he says.

The first piece Bilancia completed — a smiley ripping off its head — involved few props, but over time the figures became more complex with random household items. Groucho Marx's hair consists of crinkly black packing paper; Marvin the Martian's pistol is a screw; in the ''Psycho'' stabbing, the shower curtain is represented by a white, corrugated FedEx envelope and Norman Bates' robe, a fragment from a plaid dress Bilancia's niece had outgrown. "It ain't Michelangelo's materials," he says.

When Bilancia's co-workers found out about his obsession, they began bringing him possible accessories, like a ceramic sheep that inspired the Little Bo Peep sculpture and a plastic couch brandished with an antidepressant manufacturer's logo that, once covered with purple velvet fabric, became Sigmund Freud's sofa. Recently, Bilancia's girlfriend discarded a pair of leather boots that he repurposed into Joey Ramone's motorcycle jacket.

Certain people in Bilancia's life have driven the genesis of smileys as well, such as the "Squeal Like a Pig" vignette from ''Deliverance''. More visually transfixing than the violated polyethylene foam ball with flailing arms and legs is a smiley in a tiny rocking chair strumming "Dueling Banjos" — a shout-out to Eric Weissberg, Bilancia's former neighbor who played the solo in the movie's famous theme. "The Jewish kid from New York was a phenomenal bluegrass musician," he says.

The smileys not only entertain but also provide lessons in history and pop culture: anything from Genghis Khan to Travis Bickle, from Gandhi to Walter White. Sporting miniscule versions of the Heisenberg hat, sunglasses, and brown mustache and beard, the "Breaking Bad" smiley clutches a sandwich bag of meth. "It was actually from my ex-wife's blue cosmetic case," Bilancia says, laughing. "I took great pleasure smashing it into tiny 'crystals.'"


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                    JOEFF DAVIS                            __“Jackson Pollock”__                
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                    JOEFF DAVIS                            __“‘Psycho’ Shower Scene”__                
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Bilancia exhaustively records his brainstorming and creation process. "Because I'm a pack rat and in case someone ever challenges my ideas," he says. A thick notebook contains a pencil sketch of the Bride of Frankenstein to gauge the feasibility of his design, a copy of the story of Perseus and Medusa to provide a reference, and photos to document the transformation of a miniature plastic Escalade to a convertible for the Kennedy assassination scene. He currently is reproducing [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lascaux|Lascaux], a network of caves in France covered in 17,300-year-old paintings. After he constructed the cave out of a steel banding frame, mesh, fiber glass, and spackle, Bilancia's cat Remy mistook it for a bed. (He added a picture of Remy sleeping in her new hut along with printouts of actual cave art to his notebook.) However, instead of Paleolithic animals, the art in Bilancia's cave consists of smiley silhouettes suspending arrows and spears above their heads. A battery-powered fire pit lights the sculpture from inside as a smiley caveman donning a crude fur vest grips a paint can, pausing to survey his work. Bilancia can whip together a simple sculpture in two hours, but the Lascaux piece will end up consuming several weeks.

Less than 60 stress toys remain in Bilancia's supply, and additional smileys that match his original stockpile have been difficult to find. In an effort to restock in advance, he has ordered samples from a couple of merchandising companies, but the eyes are too small or the lips are too thin. In fact, he used one misshapen sample in the ''Deliverance'' piece. "It looks like a weird-lookin' simpleton, so that became the banjo-playing kid," Bilancia says.

One might wonder what message Bilancia intends to convey by placing smileys in traumatizing situations while their faces remain plastered with shit-eating grins. Jesus beams during the Crucifixion; John F. Kennedy takes a bullet with pleasure; Kurt Cobain simpers in a pool of blood that has splattered the wee Melvins, Sonic Youth, and Bikini Kill posters on equally crimsoned walls. Bilancia means no disrespect but instead aims to encapsulate the indomitable human spirit. "No matter what you do to them, they're still smiling away," Bilancia says. "They're resilient little bastards. We all should be more like smileys."

Bilancia probably is right. Think about it: If someone squeezed the hell out of a smiley stress toy, its joyful expression wouldn't just remain. It would expand.

''To contact Bilancia regarding his work, email [mailto:lincolnbilancia@gmail.com|lincolnbilancia@gmail.com].''"
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  string(6898) "    Folk artist Lincoln Bilancia builds hundreds of sculptures from hoarded smiley face stress toys   2016-06-29T08:00:00+00:00 Don't tell them not to smile     2016-06-29T08:00:00+00:00  Most promotional merchandise ends up in the garbage, unless Lincoln Bilancia gets his hands on it. In 2008, a client shipped its branded swag to the marketing company where Bilancia worked, and perhaps fatefully, the smiley face stress toys had been earmarked for the trash. Bilancia took the toys and began transforming them into sculptures that tell stories from the Old Testament, recount Greek myths and fairy tales, and pay tribute to legendary artists and musicians. He needed an outlet during the dissolving marriage that brought him to Atlanta from New York City. “I would have gone crazy otherwise,” he says.

Over the course of eight years, he has incorporated at least 300 of the dolls into 190 total sculptures that cover his Grant Park home. On the mantle, Rapunzel peers from her tower at the bloody prince who fell from her artificial braid. (The following pennant is tacked to the top: “Miss Rapunzel’s Weaves, Wigs, & Extensions.”) David Bowie soars on a flying carpet near the pots and pans, and Jackson Pollock flicks a paintbrush toward Bilancia’s books. In lieu of antique family plates, the china cabinet teems with dozens of grinning figurines. And yet the neighbors have no idea the house with a smiley face flag whipping in the wind doubles as a museum.

Bilancia grew up drawing and painting under the influence of his grandmother, who at one time owned an art supply store in Queens, and he still uses the inherited leftover stock from when the shop closed. He studied traditional painting at the Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts but didn’t dabble in sculpture until the smileys arrived at the office. “They were crying out for something to be done to them,” he says.

The first piece Bilancia completed — a smiley ripping off its head — involved few props, but over time the figures became more complex with random household items. Groucho Marx's hair consists of crinkly black packing paper; Marvin the Martian's pistol is a screw; in the Psycho stabbing, the shower curtain is represented by a white, corrugated FedEx envelope and Norman Bates' robe, a fragment from a plaid dress Bilancia's niece had outgrown. "It ain't Michelangelo's materials," he says.

When Bilancia's co-workers found out about his obsession, they began bringing him possible accessories, like a ceramic sheep that inspired the Little Bo Peep sculpture and a plastic couch brandished with an antidepressant manufacturer's logo that, once covered with purple velvet fabric, became Sigmund Freud's sofa. Recently, Bilancia's girlfriend discarded a pair of leather boots that he repurposed into Joey Ramone's motorcycle jacket.

Certain people in Bilancia's life have driven the genesis of smileys as well, such as the "Squeal Like a Pig" vignette from Deliverance. More visually transfixing than the violated polyethylene foam ball with flailing arms and legs is a smiley in a tiny rocking chair strumming "Dueling Banjos" — a shout-out to Eric Weissberg, Bilancia's former neighbor who played the solo in the movie's famous theme. "The Jewish kid from New York was a phenomenal bluegrass musician," he says.

The smileys not only entertain but also provide lessons in history and pop culture: anything from Genghis Khan to Travis Bickle, from Gandhi to Walter White. Sporting miniscule versions of the Heisenberg hat, sunglasses, and brown mustache and beard, the "Breaking Bad" smiley clutches a sandwich bag of meth. "It was actually from my ex-wife's blue cosmetic case," Bilancia says, laughing. "I took great pleasure smashing it into tiny 'crystals.'"



    
                            

                    JOEFF DAVIS                            “Jackson Pollock”                
                            

                    JOEFF DAVIS                            “‘Psycho’ Shower Scene”                
                            

                    JOEFF DAVIS                            “Lascaux cave”            

Bilancia exhaustively records his brainstorming and creation process. "Because I'm a pack rat and in case someone ever challenges my ideas," he says. A thick notebook contains a pencil sketch of the Bride of Frankenstein to gauge the feasibility of his design, a copy of the story of Perseus and Medusa to provide a reference, and photos to document the transformation of a miniature plastic Escalade to a convertible for the Kennedy assassination scene. He currently is reproducing Lascaux, a network of caves in France covered in 17,300-year-old paintings. After he constructed the cave out of a steel banding frame, mesh, fiber glass, and spackle, Bilancia's cat Remy mistook it for a bed. (He added a picture of Remy sleeping in her new hut along with printouts of actual cave art to his notebook.) However, instead of Paleolithic animals, the art in Bilancia's cave consists of smiley silhouettes suspending arrows and spears above their heads. A battery-powered fire pit lights the sculpture from inside as a smiley caveman donning a crude fur vest grips a paint can, pausing to survey his work. Bilancia can whip together a simple sculpture in two hours, but the Lascaux piece will end up consuming several weeks.

Less than 60 stress toys remain in Bilancia's supply, and additional smileys that match his original stockpile have been difficult to find. In an effort to restock in advance, he has ordered samples from a couple of merchandising companies, but the eyes are too small or the lips are too thin. In fact, he used one misshapen sample in the Deliverance piece. "It looks like a weird-lookin' simpleton, so that became the banjo-playing kid," Bilancia says.

One might wonder what message Bilancia intends to convey by placing smileys in traumatizing situations while their faces remain plastered with shit-eating grins. Jesus beams during the Crucifixion; John F. Kennedy takes a bullet with pleasure; Kurt Cobain simpers in a pool of blood that has splattered the wee Melvins, Sonic Youth, and Bikini Kill posters on equally crimsoned walls. Bilancia means no disrespect but instead aims to encapsulate the indomitable human spirit. "No matter what you do to them, they're still smiling away," Bilancia says. "They're resilient little bastards. We all should be more like smileys."

Bilancia probably is right. Think about it: If someone squeezed the hell out of a smiley stress toy, its joyful expression wouldn't just remain. It would expand.

To contact Bilancia regarding his work, email lincolnbilancia@gmail.com.             13087742 17350258        http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/06/08be50_arts_smiley1_1_10.png                  Don't tell them not to smile "
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Wednesday June 29, 2016 04:00 am EDT
Folk artist Lincoln Bilancia builds hundreds of sculptures from hoarded smiley face stress toys | more...
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While driving north on Boulevard toward its intersection with Ponce de Leon Avenue, you might pass Derr Robinson Steadman in a lawn chair holding a sign that says, "You are reading this now," or, "Mattering does not even care." Stalled motorists comprise the majority of the artist's audience. Their chuckles are his only compensation. When not entertaining traffic, he sits away from the road drawing trippy postcards that portray awkward conversations at bus stops or cynical book covers like How to Shove Yourself Up Yourself, Volume Eat Me. Many of the postcards end up stuffed in a beach bag, but some of them make it to Derr's pen pal of 11 years, Ivette Spradlin, whom he affectionately calls Evie.

Derr and Ivette met at the Local in the early 2000s through her brother, who happened to be Derr's co-worker at the Rolling Frame Revue, a custom framing shop that has employed Derr off and on since 1978 and sells some of his pieces. That night at the dive bar, Derr drew Ivette's portrait and gave her a postcard of a flying George Washington wearing a green watercolor cape; the president's face was a George Washington stamp Derr had affixed to the paper. Ivette immediately appreciated Derr's humor and sense of composition and design. "The humor comes out because of how he crops it and fills the frame," she says. "It's playful and kind of cartoony, but there's also a smart, dark side to it."

image-2
Derr's bleak outlook partially stems from his service in the Vietnam War. After graduating from Hapeville High School in 1965, he enrolled at Georgia State University but got drafted in 1968. "I spent a week lying in the woods waiting for people to walk by, and then they got killed!" Derr yells. "Post-traumatic stress disorder. That's what they say I've got." (In addition to regularly hanging out at the Rolling Frame Revue, Ivette and Derr often saw each other at the Atlanta VA Medical Center where she worked at the valet check-in and he still receives treatment.)

After his one-year, 10-month, 25-day stint in the Army, Derr secured a job with Eastern Air Lines in Hartford, Connecticut, but the company fired him in 1975. While hitchhiking back to Atlanta, he started creating his postcards. "I couldn't carry anything bigger," he says, noting his artistic talent dates back to second grade. "When I was supposed to be developing my reading and math skills, I was taken out of class to paint sets for school plays. So I don't know words like 'incoherent' and such."

image-3
Ivette moved to Pennsylvania in August 2005 to attend graduate school but asked Derr to be her pen pal before relocating. Derr mails her postcards in intermittent spurts, and Ivette, now an adjunct professor of photography at Carnegie Mellon University, sends Derr photographs in return. Ivette's favorite postcard portrays two feet on a blue and white tile floor along with the headline, "At least one way that tattoos can be functional as well as decorative." The tattoo on the left foot reads, "This is this one," and the tattoo on the right foot reads, "This is this one" — which encapsulates the absurd sense of humor she and Derr share. "When I was at the University of Georgia, I made the boring drive on 316 to Atlanta a lot," Ivette says. "I had an idea for a performance piece where someone on the side of the road holds a sign that says 'Hey you,' and 10 minutes down the road, another person is holding a sign that says, 'No really. Hey you.'"

Ivette brought a crowd of friends to Derr's show at the Eyedrum Art & Music Gallery in 2005 prior to her departure, and to this day she champions his drawings. Two years ago, she shot footage for Nothing Is All That I Yearn For, a feature-length documentary about Derr that would help promote and sell his work, and hopefully lead to another show at a local gallery. Because Ivette's professional and personal obligations have prevented the film's completion, she recently set up an Instagram profile to build a fanbase in the meantime. The Instagram profile consists of Derr's artwork, photographs of Derr, and clips from the documentary. Soon, Ivette and two collaborators will launch video interpretations of Derr's postcards on the account as well. As a result of the film and growing Instagram following, Derr has become more prolific in the past couple years. "As you age and don't have a partner — and you're also living in poverty plus with mental illness — it's hard to want to keep going," Ivette says. "I feel that my interest and care mean a lot to Derr."

"What do we thrive on? Praise and all that," Derr says. "Evie got me to where I am today."

image-4
Some of the postcards stored in Derr's beach bag are addressed to former classmates, or the recipient section remains blank. An overwhelming majority, though, were intended to be sent to Ivette's old addresses in Pittsburgh. Perhaps he should send them anyway and make strangers cackle. In Derr's world, laughter is currency."
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While driving north on Boulevard toward its intersection with Ponce de Leon Avenue, you might pass [https://www.instagram.com/derrrobinson/|Derr Robinson Steadman] in a lawn chair holding a sign that says, "You are reading this now," or, "Mattering does not even care." Stalled motorists comprise the majority of the artist's audience. Their chuckles are his only compensation. When not entertaining traffic, he sits away from the road drawing trippy postcards that portray awkward conversations at bus stops or cynical book covers like ''How to Shove Yourself Up Yourself, Volume Eat Me''. Many of the postcards end up stuffed in a beach bag, but some of them make it to Derr's pen pal of 11 years, Ivette Spradlin, whom he affectionately calls Evie.

Derr and Ivette met at the Local in the early 2000s through her brother, who happened to be Derr's co-worker at the Rolling Frame Revue, a custom framing shop that has employed Derr off and on since 1978 and sells some of his pieces. That night at the dive bar, Derr drew Ivette's portrait and gave her a postcard of a flying George Washington wearing a green watercolor cape; the president's face was a George Washington stamp Derr had affixed to the paper. Ivette immediately appreciated Derr's humor and sense of composition and design. "The humor comes out because of how he crops it and fills the frame," she says. "It's playful and kind of cartoony, but there's also a smart, dark side to it."

[image-2]
Derr's bleak outlook partially stems from his service in the Vietnam War. After graduating from Hapeville High School in 1965, he enrolled at Georgia State University but got drafted in 1968. "I spent a week lying in the woods waiting for people to walk by, and then they got killed!" Derr yells. "Post-traumatic stress disorder. That's what they say I've got." (In addition to regularly hanging out at the Rolling Frame Revue, Ivette and Derr often saw each other at the Atlanta VA Medical Center where she worked at the valet check-in and he still receives treatment.)

After his one-year, 10-month, 25-day stint in the Army, Derr secured a job with Eastern Air Lines in Hartford, Connecticut, but the company fired him in 1975. While hitchhiking back to Atlanta, he started creating his postcards. "I couldn't carry anything bigger," he says, noting his artistic talent dates back to second grade. "When I was supposed to be developing my reading and math skills, I was taken out of class to paint sets for school plays. So I don't know words like 'incoherent' and such."

[image-3]
Ivette moved to Pennsylvania in August 2005 to attend graduate school but asked Derr to be her pen pal before relocating. Derr mails her postcards in intermittent spurts, and Ivette, now an adjunct professor of photography at Carnegie Mellon University, sends Derr photographs in return. Ivette's favorite postcard portrays two feet on a blue and white tile floor along with the headline, "At least one way that tattoos can be functional as well as decorative." The tattoo on the left foot reads, "This is this one," and the tattoo on the right foot reads, "This is this one" — which encapsulates the absurd sense of humor she and Derr share. "When I was at [[the University of Georgia], I made the boring drive on 316 to Atlanta a lot," Ivette says. "I had an idea for a performance piece where someone on the side of the road holds a sign that says 'Hey you,' and 10 minutes down the road, another person is holding a sign that says, 'No really. Hey you.'"

Ivette brought a crowd of friends to Derr's show at the Eyedrum Art & Music Gallery in 2005 prior to her departure, and to this day she champions his drawings. Two years ago, she shot footage for ''Nothing Is All That I Yearn For'', a feature-length documentary about Derr that would help promote and sell his work, and hopefully lead to another show at a local gallery. Because Ivette's professional and personal obligations have prevented the film's completion, she recently set up an Instagram profile to build a fanbase in the meantime. The Instagram profile consists of Derr's artwork, photographs of Derr, and clips from the documentary. Soon, Ivette and two collaborators will launch video interpretations of Derr's postcards on the account as well. As a result of the film and growing Instagram following, Derr has become more prolific in the past couple years. "As you age and don't have a partner — and you're also living in poverty plus with mental illness — it's hard to want to keep going," Ivette says. "I feel that my interest and care mean a lot to Derr."

"What do we thrive on? Praise and all that," Derr says. "Evie got me to where I am today."

[image-4]
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While driving north on Boulevard toward its intersection with Ponce de Leon Avenue, you might pass Derr Robinson Steadman in a lawn chair holding a sign that says, "You are reading this now," or, "Mattering does not even care." Stalled motorists comprise the majority of the artist's audience. Their chuckles are his only compensation. When not entertaining traffic, he sits away from the road drawing trippy postcards that portray awkward conversations at bus stops or cynical book covers like How to Shove Yourself Up Yourself, Volume Eat Me. Many of the postcards end up stuffed in a beach bag, but some of them make it to Derr's pen pal of 11 years, Ivette Spradlin, whom he affectionately calls Evie.

Derr and Ivette met at the Local in the early 2000s through her brother, who happened to be Derr's co-worker at the Rolling Frame Revue, a custom framing shop that has employed Derr off and on since 1978 and sells some of his pieces. That night at the dive bar, Derr drew Ivette's portrait and gave her a postcard of a flying George Washington wearing a green watercolor cape; the president's face was a George Washington stamp Derr had affixed to the paper. Ivette immediately appreciated Derr's humor and sense of composition and design. "The humor comes out because of how he crops it and fills the frame," she says. "It's playful and kind of cartoony, but there's also a smart, dark side to it."

image-2
Derr's bleak outlook partially stems from his service in the Vietnam War. After graduating from Hapeville High School in 1965, he enrolled at Georgia State University but got drafted in 1968. "I spent a week lying in the woods waiting for people to walk by, and then they got killed!" Derr yells. "Post-traumatic stress disorder. That's what they say I've got." (In addition to regularly hanging out at the Rolling Frame Revue, Ivette and Derr often saw each other at the Atlanta VA Medical Center where she worked at the valet check-in and he still receives treatment.)

After his one-year, 10-month, 25-day stint in the Army, Derr secured a job with Eastern Air Lines in Hartford, Connecticut, but the company fired him in 1975. While hitchhiking back to Atlanta, he started creating his postcards. "I couldn't carry anything bigger," he says, noting his artistic talent dates back to second grade. "When I was supposed to be developing my reading and math skills, I was taken out of class to paint sets for school plays. So I don't know words like 'incoherent' and such."

image-3
Ivette moved to Pennsylvania in August 2005 to attend graduate school but asked Derr to be her pen pal before relocating. Derr mails her postcards in intermittent spurts, and Ivette, now an adjunct professor of photography at Carnegie Mellon University, sends Derr photographs in return. Ivette's favorite postcard portrays two feet on a blue and white tile floor along with the headline, "At least one way that tattoos can be functional as well as decorative." The tattoo on the left foot reads, "This is this one," and the tattoo on the right foot reads, "This is this one" — which encapsulates the absurd sense of humor she and Derr share. "When I was at the University of Georgia, I made the boring drive on 316 to Atlanta a lot," Ivette says. "I had an idea for a performance piece where someone on the side of the road holds a sign that says 'Hey you,' and 10 minutes down the road, another person is holding a sign that says, 'No really. Hey you.'"

Ivette brought a crowd of friends to Derr's show at the Eyedrum Art & Music Gallery in 2005 prior to her departure, and to this day she champions his drawings. Two years ago, she shot footage for Nothing Is All That I Yearn For, a feature-length documentary about Derr that would help promote and sell his work, and hopefully lead to another show at a local gallery. Because Ivette's professional and personal obligations have prevented the film's completion, she recently set up an Instagram profile to build a fanbase in the meantime. The Instagram profile consists of Derr's artwork, photographs of Derr, and clips from the documentary. Soon, Ivette and two collaborators will launch video interpretations of Derr's postcards on the account as well. As a result of the film and growing Instagram following, Derr has become more prolific in the past couple years. "As you age and don't have a partner — and you're also living in poverty plus with mental illness — it's hard to want to keep going," Ivette says. "I feel that my interest and care mean a lot to Derr."

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image-4
Some of the postcards stored in Derr's beach bag are addressed to former classmates, or the recipient section remains blank. An overwhelming majority, though, were intended to be sent to Ivette's old addresses in Pittsburgh. Perhaps he should send them anyway and make strangers cackle. In Derr's world, laughter is currency.             13087180 17179656        http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/04/062403_arts_derr1_1_02.png                  You are reading this now "
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Article

Wednesday May 4, 2016 04:00 am EDT
Vietnam vet artist Derr Robinson Steadman draws trippy postcards all day and mails them to his pen pal in Pittsburgh | more...

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  string(4334) "The gardens at Oakland Cemetery are ablaze with spring. Hot pink azaleas have engulfed the beds around the Bell Tower and plots along the pathways burn bright with green. The season has just begun, though, and it's still cool in the early morning, particularly under the shade of the towering magnolias where artist/gardener Cooper Sanchez is installing work for April 16's Illumine: An Evening of Light and Art in the Gardens.

For six months Sanchez gathered wisteria vines from abandoned acres and untended lots. He's dried and whitewashed them and draped the knotty ropes from tree branches. The sculptural vines curl against and twist in tandem with the lines of the giant trees. The stark white color makes each tree — four magnolias and one Chinese evergreen oak — into a beacon.

"I've been messing with this idea for a few years," Sanchez says. "I like taking wisteria and repurposing it. I guess being a gardener, we're always twisting and manipulating and retraining plants."

For Illumine, Sanchez crafted lanterns out of tomato cages, created a new series of light boxes, and enlisted three of his artist friends to turn Oakland into a gallery for an evening. On April 16, visitors will guide themselves through the grounds, drawing a route from luminary to luminary and exploring the gardens as twilight turns to dusk turns to night.

"I can't show the kind of work that I want to show in a traditional gallery setting," Sanchez says. "For me, it's become more about putting somebody in a place that is important to me or a place that I find interesting. This isn't a gallery, but to me it's like an outdoor museum. I truly adore this place."

Sanchez graduated from the School of Visual Arts in New York in 1999. Never partial to a desk job, Sanchez ran a landscape service for a stretch and worked as a graphic designer before coming on at Oakland eight years ago. As head gardener, he maintains the flora year round in areas of the cemetery that are actively being restored, about a quarter of the property's 48 acres.

image-1
Illumine won't be the first time Sanchez has used Oakland's Victorian backdrop as a gallery for his work. In 2009 he created the moody Oakland :: In the Greenhouse Ruins. It featured his paintings, light boxes, and cyanotypes (blue photographic prints) and spoke directly to the cemetery's history and aesthetic, with its ornate mausoleums, rambling cobblestone walkways, and crumbling greenhouse.

At Illumine, Charles Ladson will show four large-scale paintings, which Sanchez describes as "surreal" and "dreamlike." Filmmaker Steve Bransford will project selected excerpts from his and Sanchez's ongoing documentary about renowned gardener Ryan Gainey, one of Sanchez's mentors. Elizabeth Ingram, a designer and stylist who's worked on Ford Fry's recent restaurants, has been charring furniture and burning cabinetry for a takeover of Oakland's new greenhouse.

Along the paths from the gates to the greenhouse and under those wisteria canopies, Sanchez is installing his light boxes containing pressed plants, cyanotypes, and smoke drawings or a combination of the techniques.

To make the smoke drawings, he burns diesel or lamp oil in an old-timey lantern and holds semi-opaque Plexiglas above the flame to capture the soot and smoke. Then he makes his marks with his hands and fingernails or some other tool.

"It's really hard to control smoke or draw with it. It's almost like finger-painting because it's so delicate," he says.

For his pressed botanicals (a year's worth, most from Oakland), he might go two, four, or six layers thick, sometimes including photographs, varnish, or translucent paper for added texture and depth. In "Pressed Iris," Japanese irises poke up through a tangle of bare branches from a photo of a winter tree at Oakland.

"Pressed botanicals, to me, they always seem like a real Victorian thing to do," he says. "Same thing with cyanotypes. It just naturally lends itself to that period of time when people were very interested in science, in the natural world and capturing it in some way or another. And that's a happy accident — I'm into that and they were into that."

The result is gauzy and ethereal; spectral silhouettes of garden fragments that highlight the natural elements surrounding us, particularly in a space like Oakland Cemetery."
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  string(4504) "The gardens at Oakland Cemetery are ablaze with spring. Hot pink azaleas have engulfed the beds around the Bell Tower and plots along the pathways burn bright with green. The season has just begun, though, and it's still cool in the early morning, particularly under the shade of the towering magnolias where artist/gardener Cooper Sanchez is installing work for April 16's ''Illumine: An Evening of Light and Art in the Gardens''.

For six months Sanchez gathered wisteria vines from abandoned acres and untended lots. He's dried and whitewashed them and draped the knotty ropes from tree branches. The sculptural vines curl against and twist in tandem with the lines of the giant trees. The stark white color makes each tree — four magnolias and one Chinese evergreen oak — into a beacon.

"I've been messing with this idea for a few years," Sanchez says. "I like taking wisteria and repurposing it. I guess being a gardener, we're always twisting and manipulating and retraining plants."

For ''Illumine'', Sanchez crafted lanterns out of tomato cages, created a new series of light boxes, and enlisted three of his artist friends to turn Oakland into a gallery for an evening. On April 16, visitors will guide themselves through the grounds, drawing a route from luminary to luminary and exploring the gardens as twilight turns to dusk turns to night.

"I can't show the kind of work that I want to show in a traditional gallery setting," Sanchez says. "For me, it's become more about putting somebody in a place that is important to me or a place that I find interesting. This isn't a gallery, but to me it's like an outdoor museum. I truly adore this place."

Sanchez graduated from the School of Visual Arts in New York in 1999. Never partial to a desk job, Sanchez ran a landscape service for a stretch and worked as a graphic designer before coming on at Oakland eight years ago. As head gardener, he maintains the flora year round in areas of the cemetery that are actively being restored, about a quarter of the property's 48 acres.

[image-1]
''Illumine'' won't be the first time Sanchez has used Oakland's Victorian backdrop as a gallery for his work. In 2009 he created the moody ''[http://clatl.com/freshloaf/archives/2009/10/14/postmortem-examination-oakland-in-the-greenhouse-ruins|Oakland :: In the Greenhouse Ruins]''. It featured his paintings, light boxes, and cyanotypes (blue photographic prints) and spoke directly to the cemetery's history and aesthetic, with its ornate mausoleums, rambling cobblestone walkways, and crumbling greenhouse.

At ''Illumine'', Charles Ladson will show four large-scale paintings, which Sanchez describes as "surreal" and "dreamlike." Filmmaker Steve Bransford will project selected excerpts from his and Sanchez's ongoing documentary about renowned gardener [http://www.ryangainey.com/biography.shtml|Ryan Gainey], one of Sanchez's mentors. Elizabeth Ingram, a designer and stylist who's worked on Ford Fry's recent restaurants, has been charring furniture and burning cabinetry for a takeover of Oakland's new greenhouse.

Along the paths from the gates to the greenhouse and under those wisteria canopies, Sanchez is installing his light boxes containing pressed plants, cyanotypes, and smoke drawings or a combination of the techniques.

To make the smoke drawings, he burns diesel or lamp oil in an old-timey lantern and holds semi-opaque Plexiglas above the flame to capture the soot and smoke. Then he makes his marks with his hands and fingernails or some other tool.

"It's really hard to control smoke or draw with it. It's almost like finger-painting because it's so delicate," he says.

For his pressed botanicals (a year's worth, most from Oakland), he might go two, four, or six layers thick, sometimes including photographs, varnish, or translucent paper for added texture and depth. In "Pressed Iris," Japanese irises poke up through a tangle of bare branches from a photo of a winter tree at Oakland.

"Pressed botanicals, to me, they always seem like a real Victorian thing to do," he says. "Same thing with cyanotypes. It just naturally lends itself to that period of time when people were very interested in science, in the natural world and capturing it in some way or another. And that's a happy accident — I'm into that and they were into that."

The result is gauzy and ethereal; spectral silhouettes of garden fragments that highlight the natural elements surrounding us, particularly in a space like Oakland Cemetery."
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  string(4704) "    The gardens become gallery for the artist's 'Illumine'   2016-04-12T15:15:00+00:00 Artist Cooper Sanchez illuminates Oakland Cemetery   Debbie Michaud 1223919 2016-04-12T15:15:00+00:00  The gardens at Oakland Cemetery are ablaze with spring. Hot pink azaleas have engulfed the beds around the Bell Tower and plots along the pathways burn bright with green. The season has just begun, though, and it's still cool in the early morning, particularly under the shade of the towering magnolias where artist/gardener Cooper Sanchez is installing work for April 16's Illumine: An Evening of Light and Art in the Gardens.

For six months Sanchez gathered wisteria vines from abandoned acres and untended lots. He's dried and whitewashed them and draped the knotty ropes from tree branches. The sculptural vines curl against and twist in tandem with the lines of the giant trees. The stark white color makes each tree — four magnolias and one Chinese evergreen oak — into a beacon.

"I've been messing with this idea for a few years," Sanchez says. "I like taking wisteria and repurposing it. I guess being a gardener, we're always twisting and manipulating and retraining plants."

For Illumine, Sanchez crafted lanterns out of tomato cages, created a new series of light boxes, and enlisted three of his artist friends to turn Oakland into a gallery for an evening. On April 16, visitors will guide themselves through the grounds, drawing a route from luminary to luminary and exploring the gardens as twilight turns to dusk turns to night.

"I can't show the kind of work that I want to show in a traditional gallery setting," Sanchez says. "For me, it's become more about putting somebody in a place that is important to me or a place that I find interesting. This isn't a gallery, but to me it's like an outdoor museum. I truly adore this place."

Sanchez graduated from the School of Visual Arts in New York in 1999. Never partial to a desk job, Sanchez ran a landscape service for a stretch and worked as a graphic designer before coming on at Oakland eight years ago. As head gardener, he maintains the flora year round in areas of the cemetery that are actively being restored, about a quarter of the property's 48 acres.

image-1
Illumine won't be the first time Sanchez has used Oakland's Victorian backdrop as a gallery for his work. In 2009 he created the moody Oakland :: In the Greenhouse Ruins. It featured his paintings, light boxes, and cyanotypes (blue photographic prints) and spoke directly to the cemetery's history and aesthetic, with its ornate mausoleums, rambling cobblestone walkways, and crumbling greenhouse.

At Illumine, Charles Ladson will show four large-scale paintings, which Sanchez describes as "surreal" and "dreamlike." Filmmaker Steve Bransford will project selected excerpts from his and Sanchez's ongoing documentary about renowned gardener Ryan Gainey, one of Sanchez's mentors. Elizabeth Ingram, a designer and stylist who's worked on Ford Fry's recent restaurants, has been charring furniture and burning cabinetry for a takeover of Oakland's new greenhouse.

Along the paths from the gates to the greenhouse and under those wisteria canopies, Sanchez is installing his light boxes containing pressed plants, cyanotypes, and smoke drawings or a combination of the techniques.

To make the smoke drawings, he burns diesel or lamp oil in an old-timey lantern and holds semi-opaque Plexiglas above the flame to capture the soot and smoke. Then he makes his marks with his hands and fingernails or some other tool.

"It's really hard to control smoke or draw with it. It's almost like finger-painting because it's so delicate," he says.

For his pressed botanicals (a year's worth, most from Oakland), he might go two, four, or six layers thick, sometimes including photographs, varnish, or translucent paper for added texture and depth. In "Pressed Iris," Japanese irises poke up through a tangle of bare branches from a photo of a winter tree at Oakland.

"Pressed botanicals, to me, they always seem like a real Victorian thing to do," he says. "Same thing with cyanotypes. It just naturally lends itself to that period of time when people were very interested in science, in the natural world and capturing it in some way or another. And that's a happy accident — I'm into that and they were into that."

The result is gauzy and ethereal; spectral silhouettes of garden fragments that highlight the natural elements surrounding us, particularly in a space like Oakland Cemetery.             13087013 17128961        http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/04/055dfc_arts_cooper3_1_51.png                  Artist Cooper Sanchez illuminates Oakland Cemetery "
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Tuesday April 12, 2016 11:15 am EDT
The gardens become gallery for the artist's 'Illumine' | more...
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  string(3286) "Katsushika Hokusai, a Japanese printmaker famous for his One Hundred Views of Mt. Fuji, spent a hunk of his career depicting this beloved mountain from various vantage points, caught in thrashing tsunamis and demure rainy days alike. "The Great Wave Off Kanagawa" is his most famous one, according to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The adoration of Mount Fuji in Japanese art dates back to the 11th century. Today, the often-snow capped mountain holds World Heritage UNESCO status.

Ten centuries later, Ashley Anderson, mixed-media artist and video game connoisseur, adds a contemporary voice to that adoration with his new exhibition, The 101 Views of Mt. Fuji: An Art-Historical Excavation of Early Gaming.

"I'm all about finding these correspondences between video game images usually not intended to exist very long in cultural memory," Anderson says about what attracts him to video game details. "The creation of those images is very telling of what cultural influences are at play."

After five years of hoarding video game images of Mount Fuji, he's finally ready to show them to Atlanta — all 101 of them.

It's been three years since I, personally, went to Japan. Upon our descent into the airport, the pilot said he hoped we got to see Mount Fuji during our stay. I didn't. The mountain hid behind the clouds like a timid child.

Now, thanks to Anderson, I'll get 101 chances to catch a glimpse.

image-1
Mixed-bag luck in 2012 granted Anderson a broken foot, and, with it, a hell of a lot of time to organize his seven-year-old video game image collection. As he organized, he quickly found an accidental collection of Mount Fuji images, thus inspiring the conception of 101 Views.

Paying special attention to the often-ignored background and title screens of video games, Anderson began to capture more Mount Fuji images over the last few years. He blends his vibrant style with nods to popular culture in the same way he treated his Shinobi Marilyn series (2012), which enjoyed some time at the High Museum of Art.

His research involved hours of playing games on his Playstation 2 emulator and navigating levels looking for hidden Mount Fujis. Think Street Fighter, SEGA games, arcade games, and others.

image-2
Anderson says in video games, especially racing and fighting games, you must establish a sense of place. Epochal structures and geographical features — like Mount Fuji — are a shorthand method of doing that.

Like Hokusai, Anderson followed certain themes for different images, with one image even being pee-themed. That particular Mount Fuji interpretation happened by accident as Anderson was playing with colors for the sea and background. After he painted the sea yellow, it quickly devolved (or evolved, pending your POV) into fourth-grade humor. "The person stopping on this route is making 'pit stops' and at one point, they peed into the ocean and turned it yellow," Anderson says. "Combined with the toilet paper structure of the scroll, I decided to make the background bathroom tile."

Potty jokes aside, Hokusai inspired Anderson to temporarily turn into an archivist, hence the Art-Historical Excavation in the exhibition name, and he pushed past the character action to shine pixelated light on what often gets missed: the background."
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Ten centuries later, [https://www.facebook.com/Ashley-Anderson-Press-Start-to-Begin-111242802247472/|Ashley Anderson], mixed-media artist and video game connoisseur, adds a contemporary voice to that adoration with his new exhibition, ''[https://www.facebook.com/events/969810299722559/980169298686659/|The 101 Views of Mt. Fuji: An Art-Historical Excavation of Early Gaming]''.

"I'm all about finding these correspondences between video game images usually not intended to exist very long in cultural memory," Anderson says about what attracts him to video game details. "The creation of those images is very telling of what cultural influences are at play."

After five years of hoarding video game images of Mount Fuji, he's finally ready to show them to Atlanta — all 101 of them.

It's been three years since I, personally, went to Japan. Upon our descent into the airport, the pilot said he hoped we got to see Mount Fuji during our stay. I didn't. The mountain hid behind the clouds like a timid child.

Now, thanks to Anderson, I'll get 101 chances to catch a glimpse.

[image-1]
Mixed-bag luck in 2012 granted Anderson a broken foot, and, with it, a hell of a lot of time to organize his seven-year-old video game image collection. As he organized, he quickly found an accidental collection of Mount Fuji images, thus inspiring the conception of ''101 Views''.

Paying special attention to the often-ignored background and title screens of video games, Anderson began to capture more Mount Fuji images over the last few years. He blends his vibrant style with nods to popular culture in the same way he treated his ''Shinobi Marilyn'' series (2012), which enjoyed some time at the High Museum of Art.

His research involved hours of playing games on his Playstation 2 emulator and navigating levels looking for hidden Mount Fujis. Think Street Fighter, SEGA games, arcade games, and others.

[image-2]
Anderson says in video games, especially racing and fighting games, you must establish a sense of place. Epochal structures and geographical features — like Mount Fuji — are a shorthand method of doing that.

Like Hokusai, Anderson followed certain themes for different images, with one image even being pee-themed. That particular Mount Fuji interpretation happened by accident as Anderson was playing with colors for the sea and background. After he painted the sea yellow, it quickly devolved (or evolved, pending your POV) into fourth-grade humor. "The person stopping on this route is making 'pit stops' and at one point, they peed into the ocean and turned it yellow," Anderson says. "Combined with the toilet paper structure of the scroll, I decided to make the background bathroom tile."

Potty jokes aside, Hokusai inspired Anderson to temporarily turn into an archivist, hence the ''Art-Historical Excavation'' in the exhibition name, and he pushed past the character action to shine pixelated light on what often gets missed: the background."
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  string(3621) "    Ashley Anderson's solo exhibition stitches five years of research into Hokusai's legacy   2016-04-06T08:00:00+00:00 Mt. Fuji levels up   Muriel Vega 10135279 2016-04-06T08:00:00+00:00  Katsushika Hokusai, a Japanese printmaker famous for his One Hundred Views of Mt. Fuji, spent a hunk of his career depicting this beloved mountain from various vantage points, caught in thrashing tsunamis and demure rainy days alike. "The Great Wave Off Kanagawa" is his most famous one, according to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The adoration of Mount Fuji in Japanese art dates back to the 11th century. Today, the often-snow capped mountain holds World Heritage UNESCO status.

Ten centuries later, Ashley Anderson, mixed-media artist and video game connoisseur, adds a contemporary voice to that adoration with his new exhibition, The 101 Views of Mt. Fuji: An Art-Historical Excavation of Early Gaming.

"I'm all about finding these correspondences between video game images usually not intended to exist very long in cultural memory," Anderson says about what attracts him to video game details. "The creation of those images is very telling of what cultural influences are at play."

After five years of hoarding video game images of Mount Fuji, he's finally ready to show them to Atlanta — all 101 of them.

It's been three years since I, personally, went to Japan. Upon our descent into the airport, the pilot said he hoped we got to see Mount Fuji during our stay. I didn't. The mountain hid behind the clouds like a timid child.

Now, thanks to Anderson, I'll get 101 chances to catch a glimpse.

image-1
Mixed-bag luck in 2012 granted Anderson a broken foot, and, with it, a hell of a lot of time to organize his seven-year-old video game image collection. As he organized, he quickly found an accidental collection of Mount Fuji images, thus inspiring the conception of 101 Views.

Paying special attention to the often-ignored background and title screens of video games, Anderson began to capture more Mount Fuji images over the last few years. He blends his vibrant style with nods to popular culture in the same way he treated his Shinobi Marilyn series (2012), which enjoyed some time at the High Museum of Art.

His research involved hours of playing games on his Playstation 2 emulator and navigating levels looking for hidden Mount Fujis. Think Street Fighter, SEGA games, arcade games, and others.

image-2
Anderson says in video games, especially racing and fighting games, you must establish a sense of place. Epochal structures and geographical features — like Mount Fuji — are a shorthand method of doing that.

Like Hokusai, Anderson followed certain themes for different images, with one image even being pee-themed. That particular Mount Fuji interpretation happened by accident as Anderson was playing with colors for the sea and background. After he painted the sea yellow, it quickly devolved (or evolved, pending your POV) into fourth-grade humor. "The person stopping on this route is making 'pit stops' and at one point, they peed into the ocean and turned it yellow," Anderson says. "Combined with the toilet paper structure of the scroll, I decided to make the background bathroom tile."

Potty jokes aside, Hokusai inspired Anderson to temporarily turn into an archivist, hence the Art-Historical Excavation in the exhibition name, and he pushed past the character action to shine pixelated light on what often gets missed: the background.             13086926 17107622        http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/04/050aa2_arts_fuji2_1_50.png                  Mt. Fuji levels up "
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Wednesday April 6, 2016 04:00 am EDT
Ashley Anderson's solo exhibition stitches five years of research into Hokusai's legacy | more...
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Tookes, who operated Monica Tookes Gallery in Castleberry Hill for three years before its shuttering in 2008, goes on to explain how terrible it is arts programs typically get the ax first as school budgets evaporate. In fact, arts education is one of Tookes' primary passions, and something she wants to further explore with the opening of her newest gallery. This June, Tookes plans to introduce a program she's been developing for the past few years. Girls in the Gallery is a two-week leadership enrichment program at Empty Spaces that aims to connect young girls with female entrepreneurs working in creative fields.

"Girls who go through the program will have direct access to the program's featured women each day," Tookes says. She added that, for her teaching role, she will lead the program's 14 girls in a course specifically examining art's business side. "It's not only about teaching them how to be creative, but how to make money using their creative field of choice," she says. "We want to show them how to make a career and connect them to professional women who are already doing those things."

Tookes tapped students between the ages of 13 and 17 from Drew Charter School to participate in the inaugural program. She plans to expand the opportunity over time to other girls in the community, utilizing organizations such as the YMCA and Boys & Girls Club to attract potential attendees.

"I'm a huge champion for young girls," Tookes says. "We just really want to help them see some of their interests differently."

Tookes will also resurrect her initiative 100 for 100, in which she creates 100 paintings in 100 days. The paintings sell for $100 each, with proceeds poised to fund two scholarships for Girls in the Gallery attendees.

"It's fun," Tookes says. "No one gets to see their painting before it's finished. You only choose a number, which represents one of the 100 days. You don't know what your painting will be until we unveil all 100 paintings at the same time."

Although Tookes was a pre-law major when starting at Spelman College, she eventually switched to art at the urging of her professors — a move that changed her life. To date, her bold, abstract works have been featured in exhibitions throughout the country, along with private collections including the Atlanta Bureau of Cultural Affairs, American Red Cross, and the Pan African Film Festival.

One of the early progressives in Atlanta's new art renaissance, Tookes' Castleberry Hill gallery was a springboard for local talent looking to showcase their work. After closing the gallery, she spent the next few years traveling and exploring different aspects of her own artistic interests. She couldn't let her visual art go completely, however, and decided to open a new gallery — this time in Kirkwood. Empty Spaces will provide Tookes the opportunity to combine two of her passions: helping to expose the talent of local artists and teaching young girls.

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Tookes, who operated Monica Tookes Gallery in Castleberry Hill for three years before its shuttering in 2008, goes on to explain how terrible it is arts programs typically get the ax first as school budgets evaporate. In fact, arts education is one of Tookes' primary passions, and something she wants to further explore with the opening of her newest gallery. This June, Tookes plans to introduce a program she's been developing for the past few years. Girls in the Gallery is a two-week leadership enrichment program at Empty Spaces that aims to connect young girls with female entrepreneurs working in creative fields.

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Tookes will also resurrect her initiative 100 for 100, in which she creates 100 paintings in 100 days. The paintings sell for $100 each, with proceeds poised to fund two scholarships for Girls in the Gallery attendees.

"It's fun," Tookes says. "No one gets to see their painting before it's finished. You only choose a number, which represents one of the 100 days. You don't know what your painting will be until we unveil all 100 paintings at the same time."

Although Tookes was a pre-law major when starting at Spelman College, she eventually switched to art at the urging of her professors — a move that changed her life. To date, her bold, abstract works have been featured in exhibitions throughout the country, along with private collections including the Atlanta Bureau of Cultural Affairs, American Red Cross, and the Pan African Film Festival.

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"I've been pushing that concept for the past two years because art really is in everything," the Biloxi, Mississippi, native says. "It's in everything that we do."

Tookes, who operated Monica Tookes Gallery in Castleberry Hill for three years before its shuttering in 2008, goes on to explain how terrible it is arts programs typically get the ax first as school budgets evaporate. In fact, arts education is one of Tookes' primary passions, and something she wants to further explore with the opening of her newest gallery. This June, Tookes plans to introduce a program she's been developing for the past few years. Girls in the Gallery is a two-week leadership enrichment program at Empty Spaces that aims to connect young girls with female entrepreneurs working in creative fields.

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Tookes tapped students between the ages of 13 and 17 from Drew Charter School to participate in the inaugural program. She plans to expand the opportunity over time to other girls in the community, utilizing organizations such as the YMCA and Boys & Girls Club to attract potential attendees.

"I'm a huge champion for young girls," Tookes says. "We just really want to help them see some of their interests differently."

Tookes will also resurrect her initiative 100 for 100, in which she creates 100 paintings in 100 days. The paintings sell for $100 each, with proceeds poised to fund two scholarships for Girls in the Gallery attendees.

"It's fun," Tookes says. "No one gets to see their painting before it's finished. You only choose a number, which represents one of the 100 days. You don't know what your painting will be until we unveil all 100 paintings at the same time."

Although Tookes was a pre-law major when starting at Spelman College, she eventually switched to art at the urging of her professors — a move that changed her life. To date, her bold, abstract works have been featured in exhibitions throughout the country, along with private collections including the Atlanta Bureau of Cultural Affairs, American Red Cross, and the Pan African Film Festival.

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Article

Thursday March 31, 2016 04:00 am EDT
Artist Monica Tookes opens a new Kirkwood gallery and learning space | more...
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  string(4889) "Miya Bailey's upcoming art show, Before I'm Gone Vol. 1: The Art of Miya Bailey, is probably about to — as he laughs — piss his dedicated collectors "the fuck off."

The show, dedicated specifically to newbie art buyers, will feature approximately 30 original works by Bailey starting at $100 each. That's about $900 less than what some of his collectors paid last time they bought a piece from him. But the show prices are all part of Bailey's master plan — boosting Atlanta's collector scene.

"The art scene is dope and flourishing but we need to put more attention on the art collector," Bailey says, adding that he created the works for the show over the course of about two weeks, far less than the time he usually takes to produce a piece. "This show is specifically for people who have never bought art. It's like a stepping stone for them."

By now, we've all heard the story of Atlanta's burgeoning creative scene and the cool art renaissance that's happening in real time. Bailey is one of the cornerstones of the movement, not only serving the community with his own art and outreach projects such as Inspire Your City, but curating shows for others. People flock to Bailey's City of Ink tattoo and art gallery (which he co-founded) to be seen and be on the scene during its underground art shows. And since Bailey opened Notch 8 Gallery with Sharon Dennehy in South Atlanta last year, exhibition nights have swarmed with Atlanta's influencers and cool kids. So yes, the art scene is popping. What isn't hot yet is the city's base of collectors.

"I think the art collection scene is being undernourished," Bailey says.

So this entire year, the artist/curator will focus exclusively on art collectors. Specifically, his series of shows Before I'm Gone will feature three volumes — the first focusing on new buyers and the second focusing on seasoned collectors. The third volume will be a surprise, though he does allow it'll be "experimental" and still aimed at tapping into a base of excited art buyers. Bailey got the idea to focus on building Atlanta's art collecting scene last year, after opening Notch 8.

"I did a lot of shows but I hadn't seen that much art sold ever," he remembers with a laugh. "The work is selling like crazy at Notch 8. At City of Ink, they're coming to be seen and be social. At Notch 8, it doesn't matter the size of the crowd, they're there to see, study, and purchase."

But the thing is, the bulk of those purchases aren't coming from Atlanta buyers. People are flying in from other cities to cash in on Atlanta's scene, which features talented artists offering works at substantially lower prices than artists in, say, Los Angeles, London, or San Francisco. Because Atlanta's art scene is still so young, artists have to look elsewhere if they want to make any real money selling their work.

"We're selling a lot at Notch 8 but it's people coming to Atlanta to buy art," Bailey says. "Like 90 percent of the sales are coming from people outside of Atlanta. Last year, I sold close to 32 paintings and all of the sales came from someone outside of Atlanta."

Bailey, who has been at the forefront of the art renaissance, says now he's trying to link with other collectors to start a new social scene. As an avid art buyer himself, he wants to inform people about the importance of art investment. No, he's not about to start hosting seminars or tutorials on the subject, but says he'll use his own shows to promote organic conversations with people interested in collecting.

"Art collecting isn't a luxury, it's something that's needed," Bailey insists, launching into preacher mode. "You don't want to live in a boring ass house with white walls like a jail. Your home is a reflection of your personality."

And if you're living in Atlanta, Bailey says there's never been a better time to buy since the scene is bubbling with up-and-coming talent. In other words, the prices are cheap but they probably won't be for long.

"When you're seeing and hearing an artist's buzz, get them while you can afford it," he advises, mentioning that he purchased a couple of Paper Frank's pieces years ago for only a couple hundred bucks, and now his pieces sell in the thousands. "It can only take an artist a year to blow up and once they do, your purchase will increase in value like a stock bond. Look at someone who may've bought a Basquiat young."

Basically, people need to stop acting like they can't afford to buy art.

"Part of why I'm doing this show is because I don't want people to think they can never afford me," he says. "I'm tired of people saying, 'I can't afford to buy art.' It's like, 'You can't afford $100? I just saw you at the club last week!' And if you want a piece of art that you can't afford right now, save up for it until you can afford to buy it. We got to get people back on that.""
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  string(4988) "Miya Bailey's upcoming art show, ''Before I'm Gone Vol. 1: The Art of Miya Bailey'', is probably about to — as he laughs — piss his dedicated collectors "the fuck off."

The show, dedicated specifically to newbie art buyers, will feature approximately 30 original works by Bailey starting at $100 each. That's about $900 less than what some of his collectors paid last time they bought a piece from him. But the show prices are all part of Bailey's master plan — boosting Atlanta's collector scene.

"The art scene is dope and flourishing but we need to put more attention on the art collector," Bailey says, adding that he created the works for the show over the course of about two weeks, far less than the time he usually takes to produce a piece. "This show is specifically for people who have never bought art. It's like a stepping stone for them."

By now, we've all heard the story of Atlanta's burgeoning creative scene and the cool art renaissance that's happening in real time. Bailey is one of the cornerstones of the movement, not only serving the community with his own art and outreach projects such as Inspire Your City, but curating shows for others. People flock to Bailey's City of Ink tattoo and art gallery (which he co-founded) to be seen and be on the scene during its underground art shows. And since Bailey opened [http://clatl.com/atlanta/notch-8-brings-art-to-south-atlanta/Content?oid=16000246|Notch 8 Gallery] with Sharon Dennehy in South Atlanta last year, exhibition nights have swarmed with Atlanta's influencers and cool kids. So yes, the art scene is popping. What isn't hot yet is the city's base of collectors.

"I think the art collection scene is being undernourished," Bailey says.

So this entire year, the artist/curator will focus exclusively on art collectors. Specifically, his series of shows ''Before I'm Gone'' will feature three volumes — the first focusing on new buyers and the second focusing on seasoned collectors. The third volume will be a surprise, though he does allow it'll be "experimental" and still aimed at tapping into a base of excited art buyers. Bailey got the idea to focus on building Atlanta's art collecting scene last year, after opening Notch 8.

"I did a lot of shows but I hadn't seen that much art sold ever," he remembers with a laugh. "The work is selling like crazy at Notch 8. At City of Ink, they're coming to be seen and be social. At Notch 8, it doesn't matter the size of the crowd, they're there to see, study, and purchase."

But the thing is, the bulk of those purchases aren't coming from Atlanta buyers. People are flying in from other cities to cash in on Atlanta's scene, which features talented artists offering works at substantially lower prices than artists in, say, Los Angeles, London, or San Francisco. Because Atlanta's art scene is still so young, artists have to look elsewhere if they want to make any real money selling their work.

"We're selling a lot [[at Notch 8] but it's people ''coming'' to Atlanta to buy art," Bailey says. "Like 90 percent of the sales are coming from people outside of Atlanta. Last year, I sold close to 32 paintings and all of the sales came from someone outside of Atlanta."

Bailey, who has been at the forefront of the art renaissance, says now he's trying to link with other collectors to start a new social scene. As an avid art buyer himself, he wants to inform people about the importance of art investment. No, he's not about to start hosting seminars or tutorials on the subject, but says he'll use his own shows to promote organic conversations with people interested in collecting.

"Art collecting isn't a luxury, it's something that's needed," Bailey insists, launching into preacher mode. "You don't want to live in a boring ass house with white walls like a jail. Your home is a reflection of your personality."

And if you're living in Atlanta, Bailey says there's never been a better time to buy since the scene is bubbling with up-and-coming talent. In other words, the prices are cheap but they probably won't be for long.

"When you're seeing and hearing an artist's buzz, get them while you can afford it," he advises, mentioning that he purchased a couple of Paper Frank's pieces years ago for only a couple hundred bucks, and now his pieces sell in the thousands. "It can only take an artist a year to blow up and once they do, your purchase will increase in value like a stock bond. Look at someone who may've bought a Basquiat young."

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"Part of why I'm doing this show is because I don't want people to think they can never afford me," he says. "I'm tired of people saying, 'I can't afford to buy art.' It's like, 'You can't afford $100? I just saw you at the club last week!' And if you want a piece of art that you can't afford right now, save up for it until you can afford to buy it. We got to get people back on that.""
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  string(5322) "    The painter/curator is raising the stakes in Atlanta's cool art renaissance   2016-03-15T08:00:00+00:00 Miya Bailey wants to make an art collector out of you ben.eason@creativeloafing.com Ben Eason Jacinta Howard 1306412 2016-03-15T08:00:00+00:00  Miya Bailey's upcoming art show, Before I'm Gone Vol. 1: The Art of Miya Bailey, is probably about to — as he laughs — piss his dedicated collectors "the fuck off."

The show, dedicated specifically to newbie art buyers, will feature approximately 30 original works by Bailey starting at $100 each. That's about $900 less than what some of his collectors paid last time they bought a piece from him. But the show prices are all part of Bailey's master plan — boosting Atlanta's collector scene.

"The art scene is dope and flourishing but we need to put more attention on the art collector," Bailey says, adding that he created the works for the show over the course of about two weeks, far less than the time he usually takes to produce a piece. "This show is specifically for people who have never bought art. It's like a stepping stone for them."

By now, we've all heard the story of Atlanta's burgeoning creative scene and the cool art renaissance that's happening in real time. Bailey is one of the cornerstones of the movement, not only serving the community with his own art and outreach projects such as Inspire Your City, but curating shows for others. People flock to Bailey's City of Ink tattoo and art gallery (which he co-founded) to be seen and be on the scene during its underground art shows. And since Bailey opened Notch 8 Gallery with Sharon Dennehy in South Atlanta last year, exhibition nights have swarmed with Atlanta's influencers and cool kids. So yes, the art scene is popping. What isn't hot yet is the city's base of collectors.

"I think the art collection scene is being undernourished," Bailey says.

So this entire year, the artist/curator will focus exclusively on art collectors. Specifically, his series of shows Before I'm Gone will feature three volumes — the first focusing on new buyers and the second focusing on seasoned collectors. The third volume will be a surprise, though he does allow it'll be "experimental" and still aimed at tapping into a base of excited art buyers. Bailey got the idea to focus on building Atlanta's art collecting scene last year, after opening Notch 8.

"I did a lot of shows but I hadn't seen that much art sold ever," he remembers with a laugh. "The work is selling like crazy at Notch 8. At City of Ink, they're coming to be seen and be social. At Notch 8, it doesn't matter the size of the crowd, they're there to see, study, and purchase."

But the thing is, the bulk of those purchases aren't coming from Atlanta buyers. People are flying in from other cities to cash in on Atlanta's scene, which features talented artists offering works at substantially lower prices than artists in, say, Los Angeles, London, or San Francisco. Because Atlanta's art scene is still so young, artists have to look elsewhere if they want to make any real money selling their work.

"We're selling a lot at Notch 8 but it's people coming to Atlanta to buy art," Bailey says. "Like 90 percent of the sales are coming from people outside of Atlanta. Last year, I sold close to 32 paintings and all of the sales came from someone outside of Atlanta."

Bailey, who has been at the forefront of the art renaissance, says now he's trying to link with other collectors to start a new social scene. As an avid art buyer himself, he wants to inform people about the importance of art investment. No, he's not about to start hosting seminars or tutorials on the subject, but says he'll use his own shows to promote organic conversations with people interested in collecting.

"Art collecting isn't a luxury, it's something that's needed," Bailey insists, launching into preacher mode. "You don't want to live in a boring ass house with white walls like a jail. Your home is a reflection of your personality."

And if you're living in Atlanta, Bailey says there's never been a better time to buy since the scene is bubbling with up-and-coming talent. In other words, the prices are cheap but they probably won't be for long.

"When you're seeing and hearing an artist's buzz, get them while you can afford it," he advises, mentioning that he purchased a couple of Paper Frank's pieces years ago for only a couple hundred bucks, and now his pieces sell in the thousands. "It can only take an artist a year to blow up and once they do, your purchase will increase in value like a stock bond. Look at someone who may've bought a Basquiat young."

Basically, people need to stop acting like they can't afford to buy art.

"Part of why I'm doing this show is because I don't want people to think they can never afford me," he says. "I'm tired of people saying, 'I can't afford to buy art.' It's like, 'You can't afford $100? I just saw you at the club last week!' And if you want a piece of art that you can't afford right now, save up for it until you can afford to buy it. We got to get people back on that."             13086682 17042692        http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/03/040d02_arts_miya1_1_46.png                  Miya Bailey wants to make an art collector out of you "
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Article

Tuesday March 15, 2016 04:00 am EDT
The painter/curator is raising the stakes in Atlanta's cool art renaissance | more...
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  string(70) "Ten Atlanta artists in constant conversation with their 'patron saint'"
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  string(16434) "Much like Martin Luther King Jr., you can feel the influence of renowned artist Jean-Michel Basquiat all throughout Atlanta. It's there, on the giant Hebru Brantley-helmed mural on Edgewood, it's at Krog Street Tunnel, and in the urban galleries and tattoo shops that have come to define the city's progressive, civic-minded arts scene. Basquiat's untimely death, frantic work ethic, and ability to simply translate the sociopolitical concerns of the streets into fine art have led to his mythologization. The so-called "patron saint" is referenced by people who don't even know what his work looks like, but aim for credence in pop culture spaces. The "crown prince" and his influence on Atlanta, in some ways, intersects with King's. Atlanta, at its core, is hip-hop meets civil rights. Had the activist lived to see the artist's emergence, King might've owned a Basquiat.

Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks will be on view at the High Museum through May 29. To understand Basquiat's direct influence, we solicited words from 10 Atlanta-based artists whose work can be seen throughout the city in diverse spaces. They, like Atlanta, all have a Basquiat story.

 

---
FRESH TO DEATH

Fahamu Pecou, painter and academic whose large-scale portraiture dissects images of black masculinity in pop culture

"You don't look at a Basquiat work — you read it."

image-1
"No pun intended, but it's actually 'words,' the linguistic aspect of Basquiat, that speaks to me the most. Much of my work, like Basquiat's, is centered around or extended from words — both spoken and written. I consider Basquiat a hip-hop artist though he's claimed and recognized more broadly as a fine artist (that distinction would need a completely separate article). In fact, you don't look at a Basquiat work — you read it. Line, texture, form, tone, sound, color — these are the contexts for really, deeply investigating his works."

"I often feel that the comparisons to a 'childlike quality' or some type of 'primitivism' in his work betray the sophistication of his thoughts and ideas."

"In 2014, I edited Art Papers magazine on the theme of intersections between hip-hop and fine art. Shantrelle Lewis, an independent curator out of Philadelphia, wrote an essay comparing JMB to the Yoruba deity Eshu — Eshu being the trickster and perpetual child, the wise and astute gatekeeper, the enigmatic and cunning communicator. Her piece gave me a new and different context through which to think about Basquiat and I have been flirting with doing a broader examination of his work in this vein. Currently, the High Museum is showing a piece called "Potato Study" which features three floating heads, which are read as potatoes. But elements in the work, the number 3, and the shape of the heads is also quite reminiscent of laterite or concrete heads used throughout the Ifa world as figurations of Eshu. I think that elements of African retentions, especially those he may have experienced through his Haitian heritage are often overlooked. I often feel that the comparisons to a 'childlike quality' or some type of 'primitivism' in his work betray the sophistication of his thoughts and ideas."

"It's pretty rare that even some 40 years after his death, he continues to deliver fresh ideas and ways to think about art."

"I think one of the best aspects is that we are still talking about him, still being introduced to his work and ideas and still being challenged by them. It's pretty rare that even some 40 years after his death, he continues to deliver fresh ideas and ways to think about art. I can only hope that my own work will have the same impact!"

 

---
URGENCY AND SPONTANEITY

Jessica Scott-Felder, visual artist, performer and teacher whose work touches on ancestral and social narratives

"I see layers of urgency and spontaneity but also moments of calm and restraint in the larger spaces of color."

image-2
"Basquiat uses line and color as a lyricist uses words. His paintings are freestyle in visual form, automatic and flowing. The timeless songs have great replay value, which is why I seem to find something new in his paintings even if I've seen them several times. In his painting "Scull" the vibrancy of color is what speaks to me first, then a lively crescendo of mark making and lastly the words. I see layers of urgency and spontaneity but also moments of calm and restraint in the larger spaces of color.

"Basquiat's work reminds me to be a prolifically active observer of life."

"Basquiat channeled an urban energy — a sprawling vibrancy of cultures, experiences, and spaces in which he was fully immersed. Self-referential at times, he created work that documented his community and the community, in turn, was enriched by his work. As an artist, Basquiat's work reminds me to be a prolifically active observer of life — and to leave a lot of documentation around for the next generation of creatives."

 

---
FINE ART OR PRIMAL

FRKO, illustrator/multimedia artist whose work illustrates the merger of bold messaging and hip-hop culture

"Basquiat's work was like a new sound of music that I couldn't explain but excited me."

image-3
"Basquiat's work changed my life at a very early age. I visited the High Museum frequently with my mother as a child and upon discovering his work I assumed art was built on classical technique instead of elements and principles. Basquiat's work was like a new sound of music that I couldn't explain but excited me. Most of my friends are just into the vivid colors of his work but I've always been into the lines and space usage. [[I was also into the idea that] the content was his view on life and the times. Him being into jazz music and also being a musician showed in his work, which inspired me to do the same with hip-hop. The most important piece to me of his is "Head of a Fryer," which is a three-dimensional piece. This piece is important because I can tell it was for him and not just for a gallery showing. I think he used art to entertain himself and that is exactly what I strive for now."

"A person uneducated in fine art might just see his work as 'primal.'"

"The public definitely looks over the fact that he had so much pride in his work. A person uneducated in fine art might just see his work as 'primal' or being 'thrown together' but if you study his work as a whole, and then piece by piece, you can feel his emotions just through the line. Some of his work has a harsh tone, while some of it has a soft or minimal feel. The piece "Philistines" may be confused as being primal or childlike but if you look closer, it embodies every element of art, which makes it sound."

 

---
SAMO STYLE

Corey Davis, visual and tattoo artist whose work embodies the spirit of authenticity and the limitlessness of art as a social thought-provoker

"He's always held a huge influence on my career as an artist — I even have his portrait tattooed on my right hand."

image-4
"I've always been a huge fan of Basquiat. He was the only majorly successful African-American visual artist I heard of while growing up, so he's always held a huge influence on my career as an artist — I even have his portrait tattooed on my right hand. Recently, I created a series of paintings called SAMO, inspired by the work of Basquiat, where I re-worked some of his old paintings into a series of African masks in my own style. But since I was reproducing some of his previous work, I felt like 'SAMO' or 'same ole' would be an appropriate title. It's not uncommon for artists to draw inspiration from other pieces in art history, drawing influence from the masterpieces of the past. This is something Basquiat played with himself. His work speaks to me because he was so confident and carefree during his creative process. Although some of it might appear to be 'childlike' or 'primitive' every mark he made was very deliberate."

 

---
WORK ETHIC

Sean Fahie, visual artist/author/graphic designer and creative scene influencer whose work often closely examines the link between love and humanity

"For all the partying and drugs and late nights, he always made time for his work. And to me that's what truly separates those who want it and those who are 'trying.'"

image-9
"I have to say, as much as I am a fan of his art, I was more a fan of his work ethic. When I used to live in my old apartment, at one point I didn't have cable or Internet for a bit and I would play the Julian Schnabel-directed movie of Basquiat on repeat as motivation — definitely at least once a day [[laughing]. Basquiat died with thousands of drawings and hundreds of paintings. He had an extensive collection of work that would surpass a lot of living artists' careers. I always found that to be interesting. Because, for all the partying and drugs and late nights, he always made time for his work. And to me that's what truly separates those who want it and those who are 'trying.' He made time for what he loved. He was making art when he was dead broke, and making art when he made money. His jazz pieces always stood out to me, and when I studied art history in college, his 'Max Roach' piece with Dizzy Gillespie was definitely one that I was attracted to. I loved that his work wasn't confined to the ideas of what 'high brow' museum pieces were supposed to be at the time."

 

---
image-7

---
VISION AND VOICE

Michi Meko, a multidisciplinary artist whose work draws influence from rural Southern culture and contemporary urban subcultures

"The work for me speaks to not only an attitude but a specific vision and voice of the time period, like the records of early hip-hop."

image-5
"The work for me speaks to not only an attitude but a specific vision and voice of the time period, like the records of early hip-hop. That vision and voice have still remained fresh in today's art making. The work, although steeped in African, Creole, and street aesthetics, smashed with art history and sampled with jazz like early hip-hop records. The work has a deep patina and aesthetic quality as if it were ripped from the walls of an urban environment. The evidence of vandalism and cover-ups as mark making fall directly in line with abstract expressionism and neo-expressionism. The pushing of paint and testing the limits of materials answers what art can be, or is, from the voice grit like hip-hop."

"At the end of the exhibition, I turned the corner and there it was. I kinda just froze up. It vibrated and shook the wall."

"'Untitled (Cadmium)' (1984) is special because it was the very first Basquait work that I was able to see in person. When I was younger, my mother brought me to Atlanta to see Matisse. I am a fan of the flatness. At the end of the exhibition, I turned the corner and there it was. I kinda just froze up. It vibrated and shook the wall. I was already painting very loose because I was a fan of Rauschenberg and DeKooning. I had known of Basquait from my books, and this simple piece stole the Matisse experience away from me."

"He was the first to turn street culture into high art."

"There are so many different qualities about the work we could speak about. Whether it's the aesthetic qualities, or subject matter. I truly like the fact that he inserted himself into the canon of western art with a street language by remixing text and imagery. He was the first to turn street culture into high art. If you think about it, it's what's still happening today with what they call 'street art.'"

"He is our patron saint."

"I think most artists that care about abstractions and mark making have in some ways remixed his marks and scrawled text on an image as a painterly mark or graphic element. He is our patron saint."

 

---
page
HIGHS AND LOWS

Goldi Gold, illustrator whose hip-hop influences direct his visual narratives

"His work ethic inspired me tough."

image-8
"His work ethic when he created his pieces inspired me tough. He was constantly creating. And his expression of his artwork, from tagging on walls with some of his abstract creation with live colors, screamed of complex graffiti pieces mixed with tags in hip-hop. That 'Fallen Angel' piece, I feel a connection to. I know as artists, we're constantly trying to raise the bar with our creation. Too many highs and lows. Plenty of highs, but some days I feel like I'm crashing toward earth after a rough patch. That's why I'm feeling the 'Fallen Angel' piece."

"Even though he was inspired by other artists, the pieces still had his original touch. Honestly, the messages through the artwork [[speak to me] and showing black people with abstract crowns over their heads to show we're way more than how the public sees us."

 

---
FREEDOM FROM FORM

Fabian Williams, visual artist and designer whose work explores political and socially relevant contemporary themes

"The best aspect of Basquiat's work is his freedom. He was a graffiti artist. A drummer. Painter. Whatever he wanted."

image-11
"The best aspect of Basquiat's work is his freedom. He was a graffiti artist. A drummer. Painter. Whatever he wanted. I like to think I follow my own path as he did. I paint. I sing. I act. Whatever the idea calls for."

"You could say he gave me the freedom to do what I wanted."

"I didn't study Basquiat at all. I actually spent years hating Basquiat's work. Coming from a controlled approach to all things art, as someone who prefers technical skill, he didn't appeal much to me at all. But after doing my research, and hanging with a few colleagues, I realized the significance of his work in the pop era. I felt the freedom to apply poetic license to what I am doing. You could say he gave me the freedom to do what I wanted. Illustration in college, in a way, confined me. As an illustrator, we were taught to be a translator for someone else's vision or idea. I saw everything he did from his childlike approach to his pieces as freedom. Being a technical artist can be like jail. You put this pressure on yourself to be accurate."

 

---
VOICE FOR THE OUTCASTS

EricNine Lopez, graphic designer/illustrator/painter whose work examines the intersection of popular urban culture and contemporary sociopolitical issues

"He was the voice for the outcasts."

image-6
"Basquiat was part of that young Manhattan, late-'70s, early '80s creative movement that so much talent came out of. That was around the time I was born, also around the time when hip-hop was being introduced to the rest of the world for the first time. I've always felt like Basquiat's work was one of the best reflections of that time period, not only with the bright colors and wildness of his technique, but because he was the voice for the outcasts. I think his art inspires the same as hip-hop music inspires a generation that otherwise may not believe you can break out of this twisted social/economic structure we live under. Me, being a minority born in New York, his work is extremely inspiring to me."

"His art always seemed to be more emotionally driven, more about purpose than technique."

"If I had to pick one aspect of Basquiat's work that most influences me, I guess it would be the freedom in his drawings. He never tried to draw 'correct.' His art always seemed to be more emotionally driven, more about purpose than technique. Looking at his work is like getting to see his visual thoughts, without reality's restrictions. That's the freedom I search for with my art.

"By far the most important lesson I've learned from his life experience is not to go so hard with the drugs."

 

---
ZERO FUCKS

image-10
D.L. Warfield, corporate creative designer/multimedia visual artist whose creative concepts merge the underlying sociopolitical dynamics of urban culture in public branding spaces

"The fact that is seems as if he truly doesn't care about the viewer or consumer must have given him a sense of feeling free when he was working."

"What moves me about Basquiat's work is the IDGAF energy it has. When I look at it, I can tell that there are conscious decisions being made as it relates to composition, color, scale, etc. But the fact that it seems as if he truly doesn't care about the viewer or consumer must have given him a sense of feeling free when he was working. I strive for that feeling in my work.""
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(17041) "Much like Martin Luther King Jr., you can feel the influence of renowned artist Jean-Michel Basquiat all throughout Atlanta. It's there, on the giant Hebru Brantley-helmed mural on Edgewood, it's at Krog Street Tunnel, and in the urban galleries and tattoo shops that have come to define the city's progressive, civic-minded arts scene. Basquiat's untimely death, frantic work ethic, and ability to simply translate the sociopolitical concerns of the streets into fine art have led to his mythologization. The so-called "patron saint" is referenced by people who don't even know what his work looks like, but aim for credence in pop culture spaces. The "crown prince" and his influence on Atlanta, in some ways, intersects with King's. Atlanta, at its core, is hip-hop meets civil rights. Had the activist lived to see the artist's emergence, King might've owned a Basquiat.

''[https://www.high.org/Art/Exhibitions/Basquiat|Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks]'' will be on view at the High Museum through May 29. To understand Basquiat's direct influence, we solicited words from 10 Atlanta-based artists whose work can be seen throughout the city in diverse spaces. They, like Atlanta, all have a Basquiat story.

 

---
__FRESH TO DEATH__

[http://www.fahamupecouart.com/|Fahamu Pecou], painter and academic whose large-scale portraiture dissects images of black masculinity in pop culture

__"You don't look at a Basquiat work — you read it."__

[image-1]
"No pun intended, but it's actually 'words,' the linguistic aspect of Basquiat, that speaks to me the most. Much of my work, like Basquiat's, is centered around or extended from words — both spoken and written. I consider Basquiat a hip-hop artist though he's claimed and recognized more broadly as a fine artist (that distinction would need a completely separate article). In fact, you don't look at a Basquiat work — you read it. Line, texture, form, tone, sound, color — these are the contexts for really, deeply investigating his works."

__''"I often feel that the comparisons to a 'childlike quality' or some type of 'primitivism' in his work betray the sophistication of his thoughts and ideas."''__

"In 2014, I edited ''Art Papers'' magazine on the theme of intersections between hip-hop and fine art. Shantrelle Lewis, an independent curator out of Philadelphia, wrote an essay comparing JMB to the Yoruba deity Eshu — Eshu being the trickster and perpetual child, the wise and astute gatekeeper, the enigmatic and cunning communicator. Her piece gave me a new and different context through which to think about Basquiat and I have been flirting with doing a broader examination of his work in this vein. Currently, the High Museum is showing a piece called "Potato Study" which features three floating heads, which are read as potatoes. But elements in the work, the number 3, and the shape of the heads is also quite reminiscent of laterite or concrete heads used throughout the Ifa world as figurations of Eshu. I think that elements of African retentions, especially those he may have experienced through his Haitian heritage are often overlooked. I often feel that the comparisons to a 'childlike quality' or some type of 'primitivism' in his work betray the sophistication of his thoughts and ideas."

__''"It's pretty rare that even some 40 years after his death, he continues to deliver fresh ideas and ways to think about art."''__

"I think one of the best aspects is that we are ''still'' talking about him, still being introduced to his work and ideas and still being challenged by them. It's pretty rare that even some 40 years after his death, he continues to deliver fresh ideas and ways to think about art. I can only hope that my own work will have the same impact!"

 

---
__URGENCY AND SPONTANEITY__

[http://www.jessicascottfelder.com/|Jessica Scott-Felder], visual artist, performer and teacher whose work touches on ancestral and social narratives

__''"I see layers of urgency and spontaneity but also moments of calm and restraint in the larger spaces of color."''__

[image-2]
"Basquiat uses line and color as a lyricist uses words. His paintings are freestyle in visual form, automatic and flowing. The timeless songs have great replay value, which is why I seem to find something new in his paintings even if I've seen them several times. In his painting "Scull" the vibrancy of color is what speaks to me first, then a lively crescendo of mark making and lastly the words. I see layers of urgency and spontaneity but also moments of calm and restraint in the larger spaces of color.

__''"Basquiat's work reminds me to be a prolifically active observer of life."''__

"Basquiat channeled an urban energy — a sprawling vibrancy of cultures, experiences, and spaces in which he was fully immersed. Self-referential at times, he created work that documented his community and the community, in turn, was enriched by his work. As an artist, Basquiat's work reminds me to be a prolifically active observer of life — and to leave a lot of documentation around for the next generation of creatives."

 

---
__FINE ART OR PRIMAL__

[http://frko.bigcartel.com/|FRKO], illustrator/multimedia artist whose work illustrates the merger of bold messaging and hip-hop culture

__''"Basquiat's work was like a new sound of music that I couldn't explain but excited me."''__

[image-3]
"Basquiat's work changed my life at a very early age. I visited the High Museum frequently with my mother as a child and upon discovering his work I assumed art was built on classical technique instead of elements and principles. Basquiat's work was like a new sound of music that I couldn't explain but excited me. Most of my friends are just into the vivid colors of his work but I've always been into the lines and space usage. [[[[I was also into the idea that] the content was his view on life and the times. Him being into jazz music and also being a musician showed in his work, which inspired me to do the same with hip-hop. The most important piece to me of his is "Head of a Fryer," which is a three-dimensional piece. This piece is important because I can tell it was for him and not just for a gallery showing. I think he used art to entertain himself and that is exactly what I strive for now."

__''"A person uneducated in fine art might just see his work as 'primal.'"''__

"The public definitely looks over the fact that he had so much pride in his work. A person uneducated in fine art might just see his work as 'primal' or being 'thrown together' but if you study his work as a whole, and then piece by piece, you can feel his emotions just through the line. Some of his work has a harsh tone, while some of it has a soft or minimal feel. The piece "Philistines" may be confused as being primal or childlike but if you look closer, it embodies every element of art, which makes it sound."

 

---
__SAMO STYLE__

[http://www.iamcoreydavis.com/|Corey Davis], visual and tattoo artist whose work embodies the spirit of authenticity and the limitlessness of art as a social thought-provoker

__''"He's always held a huge influence on my career as an artist — I even have his portrait tattooed on my right hand."''__

[image-4]
"I've always been a huge fan of Basquiat. He was the only majorly successful African-American visual artist I heard of while growing up, so he's always held a huge influence on my career as an artist — I even have his portrait tattooed on my right hand. Recently, I created a series of paintings called ''SAMO'', inspired by the work of Basquiat, where I re-worked some of his old paintings into a series of African masks in my own style. But since I was reproducing some of his previous work, I felt like 'SAMO' or 'same ole' would be an appropriate title. It's not uncommon for artists to draw inspiration from other pieces in art history, drawing influence from the masterpieces of the past. This is something Basquiat played with himself. His work speaks to me because he was so confident and carefree during his creative process. Although some of it might appear to be 'childlike' or 'primitive' every mark he made was very deliberate."

 

---
__WORK ETHIC__

[https://seanfahie.carbonmade.com/|Sean Fahie], visual artist/author/graphic designer and creative scene influencer whose work often closely examines the link between love and humanity

__''"For all the partying and drugs and late nights, he always made time for his work. And to me that's what truly separates those who want it and those who are 'trying.'"''__

[image-9]
"I have to say, as much as I am a fan of his art, I was more a fan of his work ethic. When I used to live in my old apartment, at one point I didn't have cable or Internet for a bit and I would play the Julian Schnabel-directed movie of ''Basquiat'' on repeat as motivation — definitely at least once a day [[[[laughing]. Basquiat died with thousands of drawings and hundreds of paintings. He had an extensive collection of work that would surpass a lot of living artists' careers. I always found that to be interesting. Because, for all the partying and drugs and late nights, he always made time for his work. And to me that's what truly separates those who want it and those who are 'trying.' He made time for what he loved. He was making art when he was dead broke, and making art when he made money. His jazz pieces always stood out to me, and when I studied art history in college, his 'Max Roach' piece with Dizzy Gillespie was definitely one that I was attracted to. I loved that his work wasn't confined to the ideas of what 'high brow' museum pieces were supposed to be at the time."

 

---
[image-7]

---
__VISION AND VOICE__

[http://www.michimeko.com/|Michi Meko], a multidisciplinary artist whose work draws influence from rural Southern culture and contemporary urban subcultures

__''"The work for me speaks to not only an attitude but a specific vision and voice of the time period, like the records of early hip-hop."''__

[image-5]
"The work for me speaks to not only an attitude but a specific vision and voice of the time period, like the records of early hip-hop. That vision and voice have still remained fresh in today's art making. The work, although steeped in African, Creole, and street aesthetics, smashed with art history and sampled with jazz like early hip-hop records. The work has a deep patina and aesthetic quality as if it were ripped from the walls of an urban environment. The evidence of vandalism and cover-ups as mark making fall directly in line with abstract expressionism and neo-expressionism. The pushing of paint and testing the limits of materials answers what art can be, or is, from the voice grit like hip-hop."

__''"At the end of the exhibition, I turned the corner and there it was. I kinda just froze up. It vibrated and shook the wall."''__

"'Untitled (Cadmium)' (1984) is special because it was the very first Basquait work that I was able to see in person. When I was younger, my mother brought me to Atlanta to see Matisse. I am a fan of the flatness. At the end of the exhibition, I turned the corner and there it was. I kinda just froze up. It vibrated and shook the wall. I was already painting very loose because I was a fan of Rauschenberg and DeKooning. I had known of Basquait from my books, and this simple piece stole the Matisse experience away from me."

__''"He was the first to turn street culture into high art."''__

"There are so many different qualities about the work we could speak about. Whether it's the aesthetic qualities, or subject matter. I truly like the fact that he inserted himself into the canon of western art with a street language by remixing text and imagery. He was the first to turn street culture into high art. If you think about it, it's what's still happening today with what they call 'street art.'"

__''"He is our patron saint."''__

"I think most artists that care about abstractions and mark making have in some ways remixed his marks and scrawled text on an image as a painterly mark or graphic element. He is our patron saint."

 

---
[page]
__HIGHS AND LOWS__

[https://twitter.com/goldigold|Goldi Gold], illustrator whose hip-hop influences direct his visual narratives

__''"His work ethic inspired me tough."''__

[image-8]
"His work ethic when he created his pieces inspired me tough. He was constantly creating. And his expression of his artwork, from tagging on walls with some of his abstract creation with live colors, screamed of complex graffiti pieces mixed with tags in hip-hop. That 'Fallen Angel' piece, I feel a connection to. I know as artists, we're constantly trying to raise the bar with our creation. Too many highs and lows. Plenty of highs, but some days I feel like I'm crashing toward earth after a rough patch. That's why I'm feeling the 'Fallen Angel' piece."

"Even though he was inspired by other artists, the pieces still had his original touch. Honestly, the messages through the artwork [[[[speak to me] and showing black people with abstract crowns over their heads to show we're way more than how the public sees us."

 

---
__FREEDOM FROM FORM__

[http://occasionalsuperstar.com/|Fabian Williams], visual artist and designer whose work explores political and socially relevant contemporary themes

__''"The best aspect of Basquiat's work is his freedom. He was a graffiti artist. A drummer. Painter. Whatever he wanted."''__

[image-11]
"The best aspect of Basquiat's work is his freedom. He was a graffiti artist. A drummer. Painter. Whatever he wanted. I like to think I follow my own path as he did. I paint. I sing. I act. Whatever the idea calls for."

__''"You could say he gave me the freedom to do what I wanted."''__

"I didn't study Basquiat at all. I actually spent years hating Basquiat's work. Coming from a controlled approach to all things art, as someone who prefers technical skill, he didn't appeal much to me at all. But after doing my research, and hanging with a few colleagues, I realized the significance of his work in the pop era. I felt the freedom to apply poetic license to what I am doing. You could say he gave me the freedom to do what I wanted. Illustration in college, in a way, confined me. As an illustrator, we were taught to be a translator for someone else's vision or idea. I saw everything he did from his childlike approach to his pieces as freedom. Being a technical artist can be like jail. You put this pressure on yourself to be accurate."

 

---
__VOICE FOR THE OUTCASTS__

[http://ericnine.com/|EricNine Lopez], graphic designer/illustrator/painter whose work examines the intersection of popular urban culture and contemporary sociopolitical issues

__''"He was the voice for the outcasts."''__

[image-6]
"Basquiat was part of that young Manhattan, late-'70s, early '80s creative movement that so much talent came out of. That was around the time I was born, also around the time when hip-hop was being introduced to the rest of the world for the first time. I've always felt like Basquiat's work was one of the best reflections of that time period, not only with the bright colors and wildness of his technique, but because he was the voice for the outcasts. I think his art inspires the same as hip-hop music inspires a generation that otherwise may not believe you can break out of this twisted social/economic structure we live under. Me, being a minority born in New York, his work is extremely inspiring to me."

__''"His art always seemed to be more emotionally driven, more about purpose than technique."''__

"If I had to pick one aspect of Basquiat's work that most influences me, I guess it would be the freedom in his drawings. He never tried to draw 'correct.' His art always seemed to be more emotionally driven, more about purpose than technique. Looking at his work is like getting to see his visual thoughts, without reality's restrictions. That's the freedom I search for with my art.

"By far the most important lesson I've learned from his life experience is not to go so hard with the drugs."

 

---
__ZERO FUCKS__

[image-10]
[http://www.dlwarfield.com/|D.L. Warfield], corporate creative designer/multimedia visual artist whose creative concepts merge the underlying sociopolitical dynamics of urban culture in public branding spaces

__''"The fact that is'' seems ''as if he truly doesn't care about the viewer or consumer must have given him a sense of feeling free when he was working."''__

"What moves me about Basquiat's work is the IDGAF energy it has. When I look at it, I can tell that there are conscious decisions being made as it relates to composition, color, scale, etc. But the fact that it ''seems'' as if he truly doesn't care about the viewer or consumer must have given him a sense of feeling free when he was working. I strive for that feeling in my work.""
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  string(16804) "    Ten Atlanta artists in constant conversation with their 'patron saint'   2016-03-01T09:00:00+00:00 Because of Basquiat ben.eason@creativeloafing.com Ben Eason Jacinta Howard 1306412 2016-03-01T09:00:00+00:00  Much like Martin Luther King Jr., you can feel the influence of renowned artist Jean-Michel Basquiat all throughout Atlanta. It's there, on the giant Hebru Brantley-helmed mural on Edgewood, it's at Krog Street Tunnel, and in the urban galleries and tattoo shops that have come to define the city's progressive, civic-minded arts scene. Basquiat's untimely death, frantic work ethic, and ability to simply translate the sociopolitical concerns of the streets into fine art have led to his mythologization. The so-called "patron saint" is referenced by people who don't even know what his work looks like, but aim for credence in pop culture spaces. The "crown prince" and his influence on Atlanta, in some ways, intersects with King's. Atlanta, at its core, is hip-hop meets civil rights. Had the activist lived to see the artist's emergence, King might've owned a Basquiat.

Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks will be on view at the High Museum through May 29. To understand Basquiat's direct influence, we solicited words from 10 Atlanta-based artists whose work can be seen throughout the city in diverse spaces. They, like Atlanta, all have a Basquiat story.

 

---
FRESH TO DEATH

Fahamu Pecou, painter and academic whose large-scale portraiture dissects images of black masculinity in pop culture

"You don't look at a Basquiat work — you read it."

image-1
"No pun intended, but it's actually 'words,' the linguistic aspect of Basquiat, that speaks to me the most. Much of my work, like Basquiat's, is centered around or extended from words — both spoken and written. I consider Basquiat a hip-hop artist though he's claimed and recognized more broadly as a fine artist (that distinction would need a completely separate article). In fact, you don't look at a Basquiat work — you read it. Line, texture, form, tone, sound, color — these are the contexts for really, deeply investigating his works."

"I often feel that the comparisons to a 'childlike quality' or some type of 'primitivism' in his work betray the sophistication of his thoughts and ideas."

"In 2014, I edited Art Papers magazine on the theme of intersections between hip-hop and fine art. Shantrelle Lewis, an independent curator out of Philadelphia, wrote an essay comparing JMB to the Yoruba deity Eshu — Eshu being the trickster and perpetual child, the wise and astute gatekeeper, the enigmatic and cunning communicator. Her piece gave me a new and different context through which to think about Basquiat and I have been flirting with doing a broader examination of his work in this vein. Currently, the High Museum is showing a piece called "Potato Study" which features three floating heads, which are read as potatoes. But elements in the work, the number 3, and the shape of the heads is also quite reminiscent of laterite or concrete heads used throughout the Ifa world as figurations of Eshu. I think that elements of African retentions, especially those he may have experienced through his Haitian heritage are often overlooked. I often feel that the comparisons to a 'childlike quality' or some type of 'primitivism' in his work betray the sophistication of his thoughts and ideas."

"It's pretty rare that even some 40 years after his death, he continues to deliver fresh ideas and ways to think about art."

"I think one of the best aspects is that we are still talking about him, still being introduced to his work and ideas and still being challenged by them. It's pretty rare that even some 40 years after his death, he continues to deliver fresh ideas and ways to think about art. I can only hope that my own work will have the same impact!"

 

---
URGENCY AND SPONTANEITY

Jessica Scott-Felder, visual artist, performer and teacher whose work touches on ancestral and social narratives

"I see layers of urgency and spontaneity but also moments of calm and restraint in the larger spaces of color."

image-2
"Basquiat uses line and color as a lyricist uses words. His paintings are freestyle in visual form, automatic and flowing. The timeless songs have great replay value, which is why I seem to find something new in his paintings even if I've seen them several times. In his painting "Scull" the vibrancy of color is what speaks to me first, then a lively crescendo of mark making and lastly the words. I see layers of urgency and spontaneity but also moments of calm and restraint in the larger spaces of color.

"Basquiat's work reminds me to be a prolifically active observer of life."

"Basquiat channeled an urban energy — a sprawling vibrancy of cultures, experiences, and spaces in which he was fully immersed. Self-referential at times, he created work that documented his community and the community, in turn, was enriched by his work. As an artist, Basquiat's work reminds me to be a prolifically active observer of life — and to leave a lot of documentation around for the next generation of creatives."

 

---
FINE ART OR PRIMAL

FRKO, illustrator/multimedia artist whose work illustrates the merger of bold messaging and hip-hop culture

"Basquiat's work was like a new sound of music that I couldn't explain but excited me."

image-3
"Basquiat's work changed my life at a very early age. I visited the High Museum frequently with my mother as a child and upon discovering his work I assumed art was built on classical technique instead of elements and principles. Basquiat's work was like a new sound of music that I couldn't explain but excited me. Most of my friends are just into the vivid colors of his work but I've always been into the lines and space usage. [[I was also into the idea that] the content was his view on life and the times. Him being into jazz music and also being a musician showed in his work, which inspired me to do the same with hip-hop. The most important piece to me of his is "Head of a Fryer," which is a three-dimensional piece. This piece is important because I can tell it was for him and not just for a gallery showing. I think he used art to entertain himself and that is exactly what I strive for now."

"A person uneducated in fine art might just see his work as 'primal.'"

"The public definitely looks over the fact that he had so much pride in his work. A person uneducated in fine art might just see his work as 'primal' or being 'thrown together' but if you study his work as a whole, and then piece by piece, you can feel his emotions just through the line. Some of his work has a harsh tone, while some of it has a soft or minimal feel. The piece "Philistines" may be confused as being primal or childlike but if you look closer, it embodies every element of art, which makes it sound."

 

---
SAMO STYLE

Corey Davis, visual and tattoo artist whose work embodies the spirit of authenticity and the limitlessness of art as a social thought-provoker

"He's always held a huge influence on my career as an artist — I even have his portrait tattooed on my right hand."

image-4
"I've always been a huge fan of Basquiat. He was the only majorly successful African-American visual artist I heard of while growing up, so he's always held a huge influence on my career as an artist — I even have his portrait tattooed on my right hand. Recently, I created a series of paintings called SAMO, inspired by the work of Basquiat, where I re-worked some of his old paintings into a series of African masks in my own style. But since I was reproducing some of his previous work, I felt like 'SAMO' or 'same ole' would be an appropriate title. It's not uncommon for artists to draw inspiration from other pieces in art history, drawing influence from the masterpieces of the past. This is something Basquiat played with himself. His work speaks to me because he was so confident and carefree during his creative process. Although some of it might appear to be 'childlike' or 'primitive' every mark he made was very deliberate."

 

---
WORK ETHIC

Sean Fahie, visual artist/author/graphic designer and creative scene influencer whose work often closely examines the link between love and humanity

"For all the partying and drugs and late nights, he always made time for his work. And to me that's what truly separates those who want it and those who are 'trying.'"

image-9
"I have to say, as much as I am a fan of his art, I was more a fan of his work ethic. When I used to live in my old apartment, at one point I didn't have cable or Internet for a bit and I would play the Julian Schnabel-directed movie of Basquiat on repeat as motivation — definitely at least once a day [[laughing]. Basquiat died with thousands of drawings and hundreds of paintings. He had an extensive collection of work that would surpass a lot of living artists' careers. I always found that to be interesting. Because, for all the partying and drugs and late nights, he always made time for his work. And to me that's what truly separates those who want it and those who are 'trying.' He made time for what he loved. He was making art when he was dead broke, and making art when he made money. His jazz pieces always stood out to me, and when I studied art history in college, his 'Max Roach' piece with Dizzy Gillespie was definitely one that I was attracted to. I loved that his work wasn't confined to the ideas of what 'high brow' museum pieces were supposed to be at the time."

 

---
image-7

---
VISION AND VOICE

Michi Meko, a multidisciplinary artist whose work draws influence from rural Southern culture and contemporary urban subcultures

"The work for me speaks to not only an attitude but a specific vision and voice of the time period, like the records of early hip-hop."

image-5
"The work for me speaks to not only an attitude but a specific vision and voice of the time period, like the records of early hip-hop. That vision and voice have still remained fresh in today's art making. The work, although steeped in African, Creole, and street aesthetics, smashed with art history and sampled with jazz like early hip-hop records. The work has a deep patina and aesthetic quality as if it were ripped from the walls of an urban environment. The evidence of vandalism and cover-ups as mark making fall directly in line with abstract expressionism and neo-expressionism. The pushing of paint and testing the limits of materials answers what art can be, or is, from the voice grit like hip-hop."

"At the end of the exhibition, I turned the corner and there it was. I kinda just froze up. It vibrated and shook the wall."

"'Untitled (Cadmium)' (1984) is special because it was the very first Basquait work that I was able to see in person. When I was younger, my mother brought me to Atlanta to see Matisse. I am a fan of the flatness. At the end of the exhibition, I turned the corner and there it was. I kinda just froze up. It vibrated and shook the wall. I was already painting very loose because I was a fan of Rauschenberg and DeKooning. I had known of Basquait from my books, and this simple piece stole the Matisse experience away from me."

"He was the first to turn street culture into high art."

"There are so many different qualities about the work we could speak about. Whether it's the aesthetic qualities, or subject matter. I truly like the fact that he inserted himself into the canon of western art with a street language by remixing text and imagery. He was the first to turn street culture into high art. If you think about it, it's what's still happening today with what they call 'street art.'"

"He is our patron saint."

"I think most artists that care about abstractions and mark making have in some ways remixed his marks and scrawled text on an image as a painterly mark or graphic element. He is our patron saint."

 

---
page
HIGHS AND LOWS

Goldi Gold, illustrator whose hip-hop influences direct his visual narratives

"His work ethic inspired me tough."

image-8
"His work ethic when he created his pieces inspired me tough. He was constantly creating. And his expression of his artwork, from tagging on walls with some of his abstract creation with live colors, screamed of complex graffiti pieces mixed with tags in hip-hop. That 'Fallen Angel' piece, I feel a connection to. I know as artists, we're constantly trying to raise the bar with our creation. Too many highs and lows. Plenty of highs, but some days I feel like I'm crashing toward earth after a rough patch. That's why I'm feeling the 'Fallen Angel' piece."

"Even though he was inspired by other artists, the pieces still had his original touch. Honestly, the messages through the artwork [[speak to me] and showing black people with abstract crowns over their heads to show we're way more than how the public sees us."

 

---
FREEDOM FROM FORM

Fabian Williams, visual artist and designer whose work explores political and socially relevant contemporary themes

"The best aspect of Basquiat's work is his freedom. He was a graffiti artist. A drummer. Painter. Whatever he wanted."

image-11
"The best aspect of Basquiat's work is his freedom. He was a graffiti artist. A drummer. Painter. Whatever he wanted. I like to think I follow my own path as he did. I paint. I sing. I act. Whatever the idea calls for."

"You could say he gave me the freedom to do what I wanted."

"I didn't study Basquiat at all. I actually spent years hating Basquiat's work. Coming from a controlled approach to all things art, as someone who prefers technical skill, he didn't appeal much to me at all. But after doing my research, and hanging with a few colleagues, I realized the significance of his work in the pop era. I felt the freedom to apply poetic license to what I am doing. You could say he gave me the freedom to do what I wanted. Illustration in college, in a way, confined me. As an illustrator, we were taught to be a translator for someone else's vision or idea. I saw everything he did from his childlike approach to his pieces as freedom. Being a technical artist can be like jail. You put this pressure on yourself to be accurate."

 

---
VOICE FOR THE OUTCASTS

EricNine Lopez, graphic designer/illustrator/painter whose work examines the intersection of popular urban culture and contemporary sociopolitical issues

"He was the voice for the outcasts."

image-6
"Basquiat was part of that young Manhattan, late-'70s, early '80s creative movement that so much talent came out of. That was around the time I was born, also around the time when hip-hop was being introduced to the rest of the world for the first time. I've always felt like Basquiat's work was one of the best reflections of that time period, not only with the bright colors and wildness of his technique, but because he was the voice for the outcasts. I think his art inspires the same as hip-hop music inspires a generation that otherwise may not believe you can break out of this twisted social/economic structure we live under. Me, being a minority born in New York, his work is extremely inspiring to me."

"His art always seemed to be more emotionally driven, more about purpose than technique."

"If I had to pick one aspect of Basquiat's work that most influences me, I guess it would be the freedom in his drawings. He never tried to draw 'correct.' His art always seemed to be more emotionally driven, more about purpose than technique. Looking at his work is like getting to see his visual thoughts, without reality's restrictions. That's the freedom I search for with my art.

"By far the most important lesson I've learned from his life experience is not to go so hard with the drugs."

 

---
ZERO FUCKS

image-10
D.L. Warfield, corporate creative designer/multimedia visual artist whose creative concepts merge the underlying sociopolitical dynamics of urban culture in public branding spaces

"The fact that is seems as if he truly doesn't care about the viewer or consumer must have given him a sense of feeling free when he was working."

"What moves me about Basquiat's work is the IDGAF energy it has. When I look at it, I can tell that there are conscious decisions being made as it relates to composition, color, scale, etc. But the fact that it seems as if he truly doesn't care about the viewer or consumer must have given him a sense of feeling free when he was working. I strive for that feeling in my work."       0,0,10      13086543 17011369        http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/02/0392a3_arts_basquiat1_1_45.png                  Because of Basquiat "
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Tuesday March 1, 2016 04:00 am EST
Ten Atlanta artists in constant conversation with their 'patron saint' | more...
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  string(3393) "Zach Fox, graphic artist and social media funnyman better known as Bootymath, calls himself a "big-ass kid." The dude, 25, does artwork for Awful Records — the outlandish, hip-hop-heavy Atlanta-based label. But his rise to success didn't stem solely from wisecrack tweets. He went to school with Awful artists Micah Freeman, Ethereal, and Slug Christ, later doing interviews with the Fader, penning music reviews for Noisey, and designing merch for the Hundreds and Sol Republic.

After dropping out of SCAD, Fox couch-surfed from 2013 to 2014, often crashing with Awful folks. Fox picked up service industry gigs to make ends meet. He even took a job running food for Jimmy John's, literally running because he didn't own a bike.

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image-1
With all these clients under his belt, Fox is finally able to make a living solely off his art. Though it was likely his strong social media presence that helped elevate Bootymath's national popularity. He says his artist name has no secret meaning, nor do his tweets — ranging from "stingray hours" to interpreting smiles. "I was just trying to be funny and also showcase some shit," he says.

Fox says he feels people have a misconception about his persona based on the character he plays online. "It's kind of one big unseen performance — and that's what's beautiful, that's what's funny," he says, listing comedian Aries Spears and Cher among those who've blocked him on Twitter. Still, around 15,000 followers remain loyal. "People want this madman, when really it's just this writer and artist who is fooling with ideas. ... I'm just a normal guy, and it's hard for people to understand that. ... People are like, 'Be this or be that,' and I'm like, 'No. Fuck you.'"

Some of Fox's art may be considered controversial, heavy with phallic symbols, sexual innuendos, and profanity. "But if someone thinks it's outrageous, that's cool," he says. "I'd rather them see it as that than impotent and boring."

His first solo exhibit, Violently Coughing, features a collection of his original visual artworks and a 10-minute short film. "I would say that this exhibit and the timing is perfect. If it happened any earlier, I would've probably been uncomfortable."

image-2
Outlandish online personality aside, Fox stays humble. "I'm just trying to make cool shit for people to look at and make people laugh," he says. "But at the same time, people need to be fucked with, at least for a little bit."

Fox prioritizes his own absolute creative control, regardless if people see it as trolling.

"At the base level, all of this is garbage — and that's just the way it is," Fox says. "All art is garbage at some certain level. It's all going to be dust one day, and if you're going into art trying to take yourself that seriously — that this is something that's utilitarian and that people need from you in the age of the Internet — you can just fuck off. It's fun.""
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Fox says he feels people have a misconception about his persona based on the character he plays online. "It's kind of one big unseen performance — and that's what's beautiful, that's what's funny," he says, listing comedian Aries Spears and Cher among those who've blocked him on Twitter. Still, around 15,000 followers remain loyal. "People want this madman, when really it's just this writer and artist who is fooling with ideas. ... I'm just a normal guy, and it's hard for people to understand that. ... People are like, 'Be this or be that,' and I'm like, 'No. Fuck you.'"

Some of Fox's art may be considered controversial, heavy with phallic symbols, sexual innuendos, and profanity. "But if someone thinks it's outrageous, that's cool," he says. "I'd rather them see it as that than impotent and boring."

His first solo exhibit, ''Violently Coughing'', features a collection of his original visual artworks and a 10-minute short film. "I would say that this exhibit and the timing is perfect. If it happened any earlier, I would've probably been uncomfortable."

[image-2]
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  string(3839) "  This is the loser who posted a thing on Twitter about running over a child and his lemonade stand. Dude. That's not funny, that's disgusting. Grow up.  Zach Fox makes Awful art, preps for first solo show   2016-02-16T09:00:00+00:00 Bootymath is the Internet     2016-02-16T09:00:00+00:00  Zach Fox, graphic artist and social media funnyman better known as Bootymath, calls himself a "big-ass kid." The dude, 25, does artwork for Awful Records — the outlandish, hip-hop-heavy Atlanta-based label. But his rise to success didn't stem solely from wisecrack tweets. He went to school with Awful artists Micah Freeman, Ethereal, and Slug Christ, later doing interviews with the Fader, penning music reviews for Noisey, and designing merch for the Hundreds and Sol Republic.

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Sans legit studio, Fox carried a sketchbook, noting that during that time his art had nothing to do with music. When Awful Records took off in 2014, Fox got his break, creating and co-creating cover art for numerous albums under the label, including Father's Who's Gonna Get Fucked First? and Fox's favorite, Young Hot Ebony. "I was just swept up in the wave of it," he says. "It wasn't a 'sign your name on the dotted line' kind of thing; it just happened kind of organically."

image-1
With all these clients under his belt, Fox is finally able to make a living solely off his art. Though it was likely his strong social media presence that helped elevate Bootymath's national popularity. He says his artist name has no secret meaning, nor do his tweets — ranging from "stingray hours" to interpreting smiles. "I was just trying to be funny and also showcase some shit," he says.

Fox says he feels people have a misconception about his persona based on the character he plays online. "It's kind of one big unseen performance — and that's what's beautiful, that's what's funny," he says, listing comedian Aries Spears and Cher among those who've blocked him on Twitter. Still, around 15,000 followers remain loyal. "People want this madman, when really it's just this writer and artist who is fooling with ideas. ... I'm just a normal guy, and it's hard for people to understand that. ... People are like, 'Be this or be that,' and I'm like, 'No. Fuck you.'"

Some of Fox's art may be considered controversial, heavy with phallic symbols, sexual innuendos, and profanity. "But if someone thinks it's outrageous, that's cool," he says. "I'd rather them see it as that than impotent and boring."

His first solo exhibit, Violently Coughing, features a collection of his original visual artworks and a 10-minute short film. "I would say that this exhibit and the timing is perfect. If it happened any earlier, I would've probably been uncomfortable."

image-2
Outlandish online personality aside, Fox stays humble. "I'm just trying to make cool shit for people to look at and make people laugh," he says. "But at the same time, people need to be fucked with, at least for a little bit."

Fox prioritizes his own absolute creative control, regardless if people see it as trolling.

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Tuesday February 16, 2016 04:00 am EST
Zach Fox makes Awful art, preps for first solo show | more...
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  string(4055) "As a participant in Notch 8 Gallery's Smothered By the Things We Love show in November, artist Fabian created a piece called "The Chrismasatron." The latest in his socio-political The Contraption series, the painting depicts a father of three succumbing to the pressure of balancing lengthy Christmas lists with short money. A meter on the man's forehead offers three options: Work, Hustle, or Crime? The subject chooses the latter as he proceeds to tell Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer to "Run That."

??
The scene is one that has probably played out in the heads of people everywhere around this time of the year — including Fabian's.

??
"I'm living it, man," the father of three, and soon to be four, laughs when asked where the inspiration for the piece came from. Up until two years ago Fabian worked at advertising agencies and used that money to fund his lofty art ideas, like the World Wide Arts Federation where Atlanta-based artists would duel in an on-the-spot painting competition. He decided to quit corporate America to become a full-time artist and is now living off his work.

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"The pressure of Christmas is immense. So I understand when someone goes out and commits crime just because they want to make due for their loved ones," he says. He pauses. "But I didn't expect it to stop at my door, though."

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While Fabian was at Notch 8 showcasing his work and conversing with viewers, "The Chrismasatron" was coming to life at his house — on some Ghostbusters II "Vigo the Carpathian" shit. Around 9 p.m., about an hour into the show, Fabian's Decatur residence was being burglarized. The robber kicked one of his doors completely off the hinges and made off with his Canon 7D camera, Hewlett-Packard laptop computer, and ASUS tablet. Fabian did not find out until after show when he returned to his phone and saw missed calls and texts from both his landlord and girlfriend.

??
"When it happened, I knew who did it," he says.

??
Fabian suspects that it was the brother-in-law of one his neighbors. According to Fabian, the assumed robber was just released from prison after serving six years for (ding, ding, ding) robbery. Fabian had actually met him in the days leading up to the show as he was working on the painting.

??
"He was just walking down the street and saw me outside priming the canvas," Fabian says. "He tells me he just got out, was living down the street, was looking for something to do, 'idle hands are the devil's playground,' blah, blah, blah. So I told him he can help me."

??
In their brief interaction, Fabian says he gave the man clothes, food, and even offered to teach him design to have as a skill. But then, Fabian got a little too nice and allowed the stranger in his house when he asked to use the restroom. Fabian now thinks the man, who, he adds, was kicked out of his brother's house in the time between their meeting and the art show, cased out the house and returned to steal the expensive items that he saw.

??
To make up for his losses, Fabian has created a GoFundMe campaign where potential donors can either give money or purchase prints, drawings, and paintings of his at discounted rates. No, he did not have renter's insurance. Yes, he admits to "feeling so stupid" when people ask why not.

??
Moving forward, Fabian says that he will aim to paint more "positive" paintings, perhaps to will some good luck his way. Just last June, small renderings of his Contraptions were stolen when his car was broken into during his What Was I Thinking? solo show at Space 2.

??
"Obviously, there is some kind of power there with what I'm creating," says Fabian. Earlier this year, his Dungeon Family Pyramid installation caused a small controversy when Art on the Atlanta Beltline asked him to remove it after it had been vandalized and turned into a makeshift homeless shelter. "I've been painting off feeling lately and it feels like I'm empowering the pictures unintentionally. So I'm trying to be careful about what I look at because I can mess around and internalize it and manifest shit.""
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(4162) "As a participant in Notch 8 Gallery's ''Smothered By the Things We Love'' show in November, artist Fabian created a piece called "The Chrismasatron." The latest in his socio-political ''The Contraption'' series, the painting depicts a father of three succumbing to the pressure of balancing lengthy Christmas lists with short money. A meter on the man's forehead offers three options: Work, Hustle, or Crime? The subject chooses the latter as he proceeds to tell Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer to "Run That."

??
The scene is one that has probably played out in the heads of people everywhere around this time of the year — including Fabian's.

??
"I'm living it, man," the father of three, and soon to be four, laughs when asked where the inspiration for the piece came from. Up until two years ago Fabian worked at advertising agencies and used that money to fund his lofty art ideas, like the World Wide Arts Federation where Atlanta-based artists would duel in an on-the-spot painting competition. He decided to quit corporate America to become a full-time artist and is now living off his work.

??
"The pressure of Christmas is immense. So I understand when someone goes out and commits crime just because they want to make due for their loved ones," he says. He pauses. "But I didn't expect it to stop at my door, though."

??
While Fabian was at Notch 8 showcasing his work and conversing with viewers, "The Chrismasatron" was coming to life at his house — on some [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GP2JPwbtq0g|Ghostbusters II "Vigo the Carpathian"] shit. Around 9 p.m., about an hour into the show, Fabian's Decatur residence was being burglarized. The robber kicked one of his doors completely off the hinges and made off with his Canon 7D camera, Hewlett-Packard laptop computer, and ASUS tablet. Fabian did not find out until after show when he returned to his phone and saw missed calls and texts from both his landlord and girlfriend.

??
"When it happened, I knew who did it," he says.

??
Fabian suspects that it was the brother-in-law of one his neighbors. According to Fabian, the assumed robber was just released from prison after serving six years for (ding, ding, ding) robbery. Fabian had actually met him in the days leading up to the show as he was working on the painting.

??
"He was just walking down the street and saw me outside priming the canvas," Fabian says. "He tells me he just got out, was living down the street, was looking for something to do, 'idle hands are the devil's playground,' blah, blah, blah. So I told him he can help me."

??
In their brief interaction, Fabian says he gave the man clothes, food, and even offered to teach him design to have as a skill. But then, Fabian got a little too nice and allowed the stranger in his house when he asked to use the restroom. Fabian now thinks the man, who, he adds, was kicked out of his brother's house in the time between their meeting and the art show, cased out the house and returned to steal the expensive items that he saw.

??
To make up for his losses, Fabian has created a [https://www.gofundme.com/fabiangetbackfund|GoFundMe campaign] where potential donors can either give money or purchase prints, drawings, and paintings of his at discounted rates. No, he did not have renter's insurance. Yes, he admits to "feeling so stupid" when people ask why not.

??
Moving forward, Fabian says that he will aim to paint more "positive" paintings, perhaps to will some good luck his way. Just last June, small renderings of his ''Contraptions'' were stolen when his car was broken into during his ''What Was I Thinking?'' solo show at Space 2.

??
"Obviously, there is some kind of power there with what I'm creating," says Fabian. Earlier this year, his Dungeon Family Pyramid installation caused a small controversy when Art on the Atlanta Beltline asked him to remove it after it had been vandalized and turned into a makeshift homeless shelter. "I've been painting off feeling lately and it feels like I'm empowering the pictures unintentionally. So I'm trying to be careful about what I look at because I can mess around and internalize it and manifest shit.""
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  string(4307) "    His thieving 'Christmasatron' painting comes back to haunt him   2015-12-08T09:00:00+00:00 Fabian's life is imitating his art     2015-12-08T09:00:00+00:00  As a participant in Notch 8 Gallery's Smothered By the Things We Love show in November, artist Fabian created a piece called "The Chrismasatron." The latest in his socio-political The Contraption series, the painting depicts a father of three succumbing to the pressure of balancing lengthy Christmas lists with short money. A meter on the man's forehead offers three options: Work, Hustle, or Crime? The subject chooses the latter as he proceeds to tell Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer to "Run That."

??
The scene is one that has probably played out in the heads of people everywhere around this time of the year — including Fabian's.

??
"I'm living it, man," the father of three, and soon to be four, laughs when asked where the inspiration for the piece came from. Up until two years ago Fabian worked at advertising agencies and used that money to fund his lofty art ideas, like the World Wide Arts Federation where Atlanta-based artists would duel in an on-the-spot painting competition. He decided to quit corporate America to become a full-time artist and is now living off his work.

??
"The pressure of Christmas is immense. So I understand when someone goes out and commits crime just because they want to make due for their loved ones," he says. He pauses. "But I didn't expect it to stop at my door, though."

??
While Fabian was at Notch 8 showcasing his work and conversing with viewers, "The Chrismasatron" was coming to life at his house — on some Ghostbusters II "Vigo the Carpathian" shit. Around 9 p.m., about an hour into the show, Fabian's Decatur residence was being burglarized. The robber kicked one of his doors completely off the hinges and made off with his Canon 7D camera, Hewlett-Packard laptop computer, and ASUS tablet. Fabian did not find out until after show when he returned to his phone and saw missed calls and texts from both his landlord and girlfriend.

??
"When it happened, I knew who did it," he says.

??
Fabian suspects that it was the brother-in-law of one his neighbors. According to Fabian, the assumed robber was just released from prison after serving six years for (ding, ding, ding) robbery. Fabian had actually met him in the days leading up to the show as he was working on the painting.

??
"He was just walking down the street and saw me outside priming the canvas," Fabian says. "He tells me he just got out, was living down the street, was looking for something to do, 'idle hands are the devil's playground,' blah, blah, blah. So I told him he can help me."

??
In their brief interaction, Fabian says he gave the man clothes, food, and even offered to teach him design to have as a skill. But then, Fabian got a little too nice and allowed the stranger in his house when he asked to use the restroom. Fabian now thinks the man, who, he adds, was kicked out of his brother's house in the time between their meeting and the art show, cased out the house and returned to steal the expensive items that he saw.

??
To make up for his losses, Fabian has created a GoFundMe campaign where potential donors can either give money or purchase prints, drawings, and paintings of his at discounted rates. No, he did not have renter's insurance. Yes, he admits to "feeling so stupid" when people ask why not.

??
Moving forward, Fabian says that he will aim to paint more "positive" paintings, perhaps to will some good luck his way. Just last June, small renderings of his Contraptions were stolen when his car was broken into during his What Was I Thinking? solo show at Space 2.

??
"Obviously, there is some kind of power there with what I'm creating," says Fabian. Earlier this year, his Dungeon Family Pyramid installation caused a small controversy when Art on the Atlanta Beltline asked him to remove it after it had been vandalized and turned into a makeshift homeless shelter. "I've been painting off feeling lately and it feels like I'm empowering the pictures unintentionally. So I'm trying to be careful about what I look at because I can mess around and internalize it and manifest shit."             13085801 16410921                          Fabian's life is imitating his art "
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Tuesday December 8, 2015 04:00 am EST
His thieving 'Christmasatron' painting comes back to haunt him | more...
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  string(3712) "The focus on Ponce City Market, the new-ish multi-use development in the historic Sears building, has been primarily about upcoming culinary fare. But Ponce City Market has also attracted Atlanta's art side by hosting Flux Projects' collaboration with Nick Cave, Up Right Atlanta, last summer. PCM has worked with Atlanta Celebrates Photography and photography group #weloveatl.

??
In continuing those efforts to include more artists in the building, Ponce City Market commissioned a new pop-up gallery, Pile, in the space next to Madewell. The new temporary exhibition space opened on Nov. 6 and comes from the minds of local artists George Long and David Baerwalde.

??
Ponce City Market approached Baerwalde to bring his ideas to the empty space. He then reached out and partnered up with Long because they utilize similar creative processes and reflect similar styles in their artwork.

??
"We've definitely been aware of each other's work and been friends for years," Long says. "When I started sending images to David of what I've been working on, there were a lot of things that were similar to what he's been working on. We both had this ongoing theme that we were working with — different collections of the same idea, that triangular shape."

??
The resulting exhibition and space share the same name: Pile. As you walk around the gallery space, you can see that Long and Baerwalde implemented the gallery's namesake everywhere, from piles of books to woodpiles.

??
"The dynamic of just exercising the work in multiples starts to intrinsically form piles of the work and some other objects. That's also the way we are presenting them," Long says. "We went through different terms that sort of exemplified what we're talking about. We could've used fifty other words that would've been similar. But we actually went with the word 'pile' because it's the simplest version of what we're working with."

??
While they didn't collaborate on the initial pieces of the space, there's still a sense of collaboration between the two artists.

??
"In a lot of ways, the space is the piece," Long says. "As we are working on the exhibition, I see it as one large installation. We are dipping into each other's palette in a way. I'm using the scraps of David's work sometimes, so in a way, we're kind of in each other's business.

??
One thing they have in common is their knack for building pieces that are not what they seem. There's an illusion behind it, whether it's due to the materials used or the way it was constructed. Both Long and Baerwalde utilize recycled materials in their works.

??
"Our original idea was to build a pile of things, similar to a mountain, with materials all around us," Long says. "There's a lot of cardboard that comes and goes at Ponce City Market, some of which we are using to build versions of real things. As far as other materials, we generated our own printed matter and we use organic products like wood, wax, and resin."

??
The gallery rotates every Friday with new works by Long and Baerwalde and additions from participating visual artists. Coming up in the curated roster are Jessica Caldas, Mike Stasny, Michi Meko, William Downs, and many others. Along with rotating art, the gallery is hosting performances by musicians Danny Bailey and Rafael Villanueva, or, as Long likes to call them, "our living and breathing Pile house music installation," from 7-10 p.m. on Fridays as well.

??
"We are exhibiting some finished work, but it's not a static show," Long says. "Things are being continually rotated. We are currently curating other people's work that fits with what we're doing. We are not going to wipe the space clean and start over. It's just evolving.""
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  string(3844) "The focus on Ponce City Market, the new-ish multi-use development in the historic Sears building, has been primarily about upcoming culinary fare. But Ponce City Market has also attracted Atlanta's art side by hosting Flux Projects' collaboration with Nick Cave, ''Up Right Atlanta'', last summer. PCM has worked with Atlanta Celebrates Photography and photography group #weloveatl.

??
In continuing those efforts to include more artists in the building, Ponce City Market commissioned a new pop-up gallery, Pile, in the space next to Madewell. The new temporary exhibition space opened on Nov. 6 and comes from the minds of local artists George Long and David Baerwalde.

??
[http://clatl.com/freshloaf/archives/2015/11/20/ponce-city-market-gives-artists-a-blank-slate-with-pile-they-create-a-mountain|Ponce City Market approached Baerwalde] to bring his ideas to the empty space. He then reached out and partnered up with Long because they utilize similar creative processes and reflect similar styles in their artwork.

??
"We've definitely been aware of each other's work and been friends for years," Long says. "When I started sending images to David of what I've been working on, there were a lot of things that were similar to what he's been working on. We both had this ongoing theme that we were working with — different collections of the same idea, that triangular shape."

??
The resulting exhibition and space share the same name: Pile. As you walk around the gallery space, you can see that Long and Baerwalde implemented the gallery's namesake everywhere, from piles of books to woodpiles.

??
"The dynamic of just exercising the work in multiples starts to intrinsically form piles of the work and some other objects. That's also the way we are presenting them," Long says. "We went through different terms that sort of exemplified what we're talking about. We could've used fifty other words that would've been similar. But we actually went with the word 'pile' because it's the simplest version of what we're working with."

??
While they didn't collaborate on the initial pieces of the space, there's still a sense of collaboration between the two artists.

??
"In a lot of ways, the space is the piece," Long says. "As we are working on the exhibition, I see it as one large installation. We are dipping into each other's palette in a way. I'm using the scraps of David's work sometimes, so in a way, we're kind of in each other's business.

??
One thing they have in common is their knack for building pieces that are not what they seem. There's an illusion behind it, whether it's due to the materials used or the way it was constructed. Both Long and Baerwalde utilize recycled materials in their works.

??
"Our original idea was to build a pile of things, similar to a mountain, with materials all around us," Long says. "There's a lot of cardboard that comes and goes at Ponce City Market, some of which we are using to build versions of real things. As far as other materials, we generated our own printed matter and we use organic products like wood, wax, and resin."

??
The gallery rotates every Friday with new works by Long and Baerwalde and additions from participating visual artists. Coming up in the curated roster are Jessica Caldas, Mike Stasny, Michi Meko, William Downs, and many others. Along with rotating art, the gallery is hosting performances by musicians Danny Bailey and Rafael Villanueva, or, as Long likes to call them, "our living and breathing Pile house music installation," from 7-10 p.m. on Fridays as well.

??
"We are exhibiting some finished work, but it's not a static show," Long says. "Things are being continually rotated. We are currently curating other people's work that fits with what we're doing. We are not going to wipe the space clean and start over. It's just evolving.""
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  string(3960) "    George Long and David Baerwalde bring their art to Ponce City Market's Pile   2015-11-25T09:00:00+00:00 An evolving Pile   Muriel Vega 10135279 2015-11-25T09:00:00+00:00  The focus on Ponce City Market, the new-ish multi-use development in the historic Sears building, has been primarily about upcoming culinary fare. But Ponce City Market has also attracted Atlanta's art side by hosting Flux Projects' collaboration with Nick Cave, Up Right Atlanta, last summer. PCM has worked with Atlanta Celebrates Photography and photography group #weloveatl.

??
In continuing those efforts to include more artists in the building, Ponce City Market commissioned a new pop-up gallery, Pile, in the space next to Madewell. The new temporary exhibition space opened on Nov. 6 and comes from the minds of local artists George Long and David Baerwalde.

??
Ponce City Market approached Baerwalde to bring his ideas to the empty space. He then reached out and partnered up with Long because they utilize similar creative processes and reflect similar styles in their artwork.

??
"We've definitely been aware of each other's work and been friends for years," Long says. "When I started sending images to David of what I've been working on, there were a lot of things that were similar to what he's been working on. We both had this ongoing theme that we were working with — different collections of the same idea, that triangular shape."

??
The resulting exhibition and space share the same name: Pile. As you walk around the gallery space, you can see that Long and Baerwalde implemented the gallery's namesake everywhere, from piles of books to woodpiles.

??
"The dynamic of just exercising the work in multiples starts to intrinsically form piles of the work and some other objects. That's also the way we are presenting them," Long says. "We went through different terms that sort of exemplified what we're talking about. We could've used fifty other words that would've been similar. But we actually went with the word 'pile' because it's the simplest version of what we're working with."

??
While they didn't collaborate on the initial pieces of the space, there's still a sense of collaboration between the two artists.

??
"In a lot of ways, the space is the piece," Long says. "As we are working on the exhibition, I see it as one large installation. We are dipping into each other's palette in a way. I'm using the scraps of David's work sometimes, so in a way, we're kind of in each other's business.

??
One thing they have in common is their knack for building pieces that are not what they seem. There's an illusion behind it, whether it's due to the materials used or the way it was constructed. Both Long and Baerwalde utilize recycled materials in their works.

??
"Our original idea was to build a pile of things, similar to a mountain, with materials all around us," Long says. "There's a lot of cardboard that comes and goes at Ponce City Market, some of which we are using to build versions of real things. As far as other materials, we generated our own printed matter and we use organic products like wood, wax, and resin."

??
The gallery rotates every Friday with new works by Long and Baerwalde and additions from participating visual artists. Coming up in the curated roster are Jessica Caldas, Mike Stasny, Michi Meko, William Downs, and many others. Along with rotating art, the gallery is hosting performances by musicians Danny Bailey and Rafael Villanueva, or, as Long likes to call them, "our living and breathing Pile house music installation," from 7-10 p.m. on Fridays as well.

??
"We are exhibiting some finished work, but it's not a static show," Long says. "Things are being continually rotated. We are currently curating other people's work that fits with what we're doing. We are not going to wipe the space clean and start over. It's just evolving."             13085703 16267925                          An evolving Pile "
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Wednesday November 25, 2015 04:00 am EST
George Long and David Baerwalde bring their art to Ponce City Market's Pile | more...
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  string(3019) "In a world of injustice, a message to bring about awareness is always noble. This is the artistic task Lennie Mowris has taken on with her business, Lenspeace, a letterpress initiative in collaboration with local nonprofits and artists that seek to put out a powerful message. "The name is a double entendre," Mowris says. "The 'lens' being a source of vision, also the start to my name as the founder. And 'peace' coming from the bonds and ideas generated that bring people closer together in themselves."

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The prints Mowris creates aren't any typical, soulless Hallmark fare. Instead, Mowris uses her love of raising awareness and the printing press to produce conscience letterpress printing, a technique often used during World Wars I and II to produce propaganda posters.

??
Lenspeace uses the vintage medium for tactile, textured messages in romantic calligraphy for a slew of salty break-up messages like, "Lose my number," or "You can keep the dog." Conversely, the text often portrays posi, radical messages like, "Critical for the masses: start a revolution." The latter is a phrase that precisely sums up Lenspeace's mission.

??
"Lenspeace is a perspective on that which binds us together and tears us apart, as explored through traditional vintage communications media," Mowris says. "It's an intention to leave this world a little lighter through love, humor, empathy, and philanthropy — a spectrum of creative ideas."

??
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??
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??
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??
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??
The prints Mowris creates aren't any typical, soulless Hallmark fare. Instead, Mowris uses her love of raising awareness and the printing press to produce conscience letterpress printing, a technique often used during World Wars I and II to produce propaganda posters.

??
Lenspeace uses the vintage medium for tactile, textured messages in romantic calligraphy for a slew of salty break-up messages like, "Lose my number," or "You can keep the dog." Conversely, the text often portrays posi, radical messages like, "Critical for the masses: start a revolution." The latter is a phrase that precisely sums up Lenspeace's mission.

??
"Lenspeace is a perspective on that which binds us together and tears us apart, as explored through traditional vintage communications media," Mowris says. "It's an intention to leave this world a little lighter through love, humor, empathy, and philanthropy — a spectrum of creative ideas."

??
Its collective work aims to boost environmental awareness and cyclist rights, especially in alliance with the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition.

??
In the midst of its Year of Giving — a campaign supported by 15 local organizations including Southern Center for Human Rights, the Giving Kitchen, and others — Lenspeace plans to donate 50 percent or more of its profits to the drive.

??
In addition to working with nonprofits, creative projects are important to Mowris, who has also collaborated with artists including Miya Bailey, Scott Fuller, and Kevin Byrd.

??
On Lenspeace's site, Mowris reminiscences about working with the Southern Center for Human Rights to raise awareness for the inequality of the incarceration rate of African Americans. Mowris says this project was personal for Denise Brown, another designer who helped hand paint the posters and also had an incarcerated father. "Of every print I've ever made, I've never been as moved by a print as I am this one," Mowris says.

??
Although Mowris' interests range wildly, she says above all else, she wants to convey messages about the human experience. "Life is a pendulum constantly swinging between ecstasies and suffering," she says about a print called Target Practice. "What makes true love special is that it's committed to you ... both. We crave this experience because it alleviates the pain of our existence and celebrates the joys."

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Lenspeace acts as a reminder that change can start with merely an idea, creativity, and a passion for working with others to help those whose voices can't be heard.             13085611 16152604                          Lennie Mowris" letterpress love "
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Article

Wednesday November 18, 2015 04:00 am EST
Artist's Year in Giving campaign partners with community organizations to get conversations going | more...
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  string(16) "Meet Mac Stewart"
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  string(5289) "Not many people can say they have found their passion at the age of 20. Mac Stewart has not only found it, he's already a pro at it. Stewart, who is self-taught, has accomplished more in the few years he's been painting canvases and murals than many Atlanta artists have in their careers. He's been to Art Basel, painted with Cleon Peterson, Shepard Fairey, Michael Lin, and now has paintings in the High Museum of Art. Not bad for a kid living with his parents.

Stewart's work employs bold lines and repeated motif to construct elaborate sketches of Minotaurs, dissected bodies, and heads being impaled by industrial beams, or cut through by ribbon-like objects. He pairs these more violent paintings with ones of flowers and indistinct vegetation painted in the same confident style. There's also a touch of Picasso's cubism, Matisse's fluidity and Keith Haring's neo-expressive style which makes his subjects looks like they are in motion: in Mac's case, mid-morph. His style is surreal yet very tangible. His talent comes from being able to sit on the fence between extremes: fluid and rigid, simple and complex, violent and soothing. The steady theme, however, is the line and what the line can do: It can carve out the grotesque, embrace the beautiful, and move fluidly between the abstract and the real. Stewart's teams of masks, body parts, and dissection pull from his own life.

"We all feel cut up at times, whether it's by isolation or oppression," he says, adding that and ultimately the paintings are about "people's ability to reinvent themselves throughout their lives and how resilient we really are as humans to keep growing and changing."

All accolades aside, Stewart is serious about the future of art in Atlanta. He understands the mechanics at work in Atlanta's market and scene. "Being an artist is a challenge no matter where you live," he says. "The Atlanta art scene has been extremely supportive of my work and of me. I hope to see Atlanta continue to evolve into an arts community that fully embraces and supports the arts and look forward to being part of that."

Stewart says he also understands the importance of involving the youth in the culture and that it is a long-term investment, a pivotal move for the future of the city. He worked on free mural project with Salem Middle School, hoping his interactions with the kids could be a catalyst for a child to become a serious, professional artist. "The Salem Middle School project was me trying to get the youth involved more. And their parents too," Stewart says. "The reward is having a culture in which a kid my age in 20 years will be able to make a living being an artist."

But according to Mac, there's another piece to expanding the Atlanta art scene: respect and self-respect. Since the market is so small, artists and buyers undervalue artwork, he says. Atlanta has introspective, socially relevant art and this is a cultural service that needs to be valued higher than it is currently.

"I know countless artists in Atlanta who do amazing work and they can't sell it because Atlanta's market is so small ... We have a great community here but it's mostly a community of artists and less of people who are supporting the artists," Stewart muses. "If I lived in New York City, I could make a living — no doubt. I've sold more pieces in New York City than in Atlanta."

He's also on the fence about the crowdsourced social media movements — like Free Art Friday ATL (#fafatl) and other arts scavenger hunts — and sees the campaigns as a double-edge sword for Atlanta's creative community. On the one hand, this underground movement raises awareness of artists working in Atlanta but at the same time, it sets a certain value for local art. "I'm a fan and then again I'm not," Stewart says. "Atlanta already has a lot of trouble selling work; we don't need anyone else giving away free paintings ... It does get people aware but it seems almost disrespectful ... Artists want to give their stuff away constantly, and I'm even a victim of that, but I think we undervalue our stuff too much. I know that some people are not going to appreciate it as much because they got it for free."

At the end of the day, it's artists — young artists — such as Stewart, with the social media know-how, autodidact Internet knowledge, determination, and genuine, uninterrupted passion for art will usher in the new generation of culture creators Atlanta. Stewart says there's a train of thought among the new wave of artists who understand not only that art is cool, but also that selling art is cool because it stimulates the market, provides income, and makes people happy. He hopes that more conversations about working artists in the city happen in the future, but admits that it won't be easy if the local painter, muralist, or illustrator turns a blind eye to their community.

"No one is going to care about what your bank statement says ... Money gets me to where I want to be, but the impact you've made on the community comes first," Stewart says. "People will care about your impact on the community. Go out and meet people. Don't waste the time thinking, 'This is going to sell better,' because the work that is going to sell the best is the work that is true to yourself.""
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  string(5523) "Not many people can say they have found their passion at the age of 20. [http://www.macstewartartworks.com/|Mac Stewart] has not only found it, he's already a pro at it. Stewart, who is self-taught, has accomplished more in the few years he's been painting canvases and murals than many Atlanta artists have in their careers. He's been to Art Basel, painted with [http://cleonpeterson.com/|Cleon Peterson], [http://www.obeygiant.com/|Shepard Fairey], [https://www.high.org/Art/Exhibitions/Michael-Lin-Utah-Sky|Michael Lin], and now has paintings in the [http://www.highartconnect.com/post/116664513968/meet-the-artist-mac-stewart|High Museum of Art]. Not bad for a kid living with his parents.

Stewart's work employs bold lines and repeated motif to construct elaborate sketches of Minotaurs, dissected bodies, and heads being impaled by industrial beams, or cut through by ribbon-like objects. He pairs these more violent paintings with ones of flowers and indistinct vegetation painted in the same confident style. There's also a touch of Picasso's cubism, Matisse's fluidity and Keith Haring's neo-expressive style which makes his subjects looks like they are in motion: in Mac's case, mid-morph. His style is surreal yet very tangible. His talent comes from being able to sit on the fence between extremes: fluid and rigid, simple and complex, violent and soothing. The steady theme, however, is the line and what the line can do: It can carve out the grotesque, embrace the beautiful, and move fluidly between the abstract and the real. Stewart's teams of masks, body parts, and dissection pull from his own life.

"We all feel cut up at times, whether it's by isolation or oppression," he says, adding that and ultimately the paintings are about "people's ability to reinvent themselves throughout their lives and how resilient we really are as humans to keep growing and changing."

All accolades aside, Stewart is serious about the future of art in Atlanta. He understands the mechanics at work in Atlanta's market and scene. "Being an artist is a challenge no matter where you live," he says. "The Atlanta art scene has been extremely supportive of my work and of me. I hope to see Atlanta continue to evolve into an arts community that fully embraces and supports the arts and look forward to being part of that."

Stewart says he also understands the importance of involving the youth in the culture and that it is a long-term investment, a pivotal move for the future of the city. He worked on free mural project with Salem Middle School, hoping his interactions with the kids could be a catalyst for a child to become a serious, professional artist. "The Salem Middle School project was me trying to get the youth involved more. And their parents too," Stewart says. "The reward is having a culture [[in which] a kid my age in 20 years will be able to make a living being an artist."

But according to Mac, there's another piece to expanding the Atlanta art scene: respect and self-respect. Since the market is so small, artists and buyers undervalue artwork, he says. Atlanta has introspective, socially relevant art and this is a cultural service that needs to be valued higher than it is currently.

"I know countless artists in Atlanta who do amazing work and they can't sell it because Atlanta's market is so small ... We have a great community here but it's mostly a community of artists and less of people who are supporting the artists," Stewart muses. "If I lived in New York City, I could make a living — no doubt. I've sold more pieces in New York City than in Atlanta."

He's also on the fence about the crowdsourced social media movements — like Free Art Friday ATL (#fafatl) and other arts scavenger hunts — and sees the campaigns as a double-edge sword for Atlanta's creative community. On the one hand, this underground movement raises awareness of artists working in Atlanta but at the same time, it sets a certain value for local art. "I'm a fan and then again I'm not," Stewart says. "Atlanta already has a lot of trouble selling work; we don't need anyone else giving away free paintings ... It does get people aware but it seems almost disrespectful ... Artists want to give their stuff away constantly, and I'm even a victim of that, but I think we undervalue our stuff too much. I know that some people are not going to appreciate it as much because they got it for free."

At the end of the day, it's artists — young artists — such as Stewart, with the social media know-how, autodidact Internet knowledge, determination, and genuine, uninterrupted passion for art will usher in the new generation of culture creators Atlanta. Stewart says there's a train of thought among the new wave of artists who understand not only that art is cool, but also that selling art is cool because it stimulates the market, provides income, and makes people happy. He hopes that more conversations about working artists in the city happen in the future, but admits that it won't be easy if the local painter, muralist, or illustrator turns a blind eye to their community.

"No one is going to care about what your bank statement says ... Money gets me to where I want to be, but the impact you've made on the community comes first," Stewart says. "People will care about your impact on the community. Go out and meet people. Don't waste the time thinking, 'This is going to sell better,' because the work that is going to sell the best is the work that is true to yourself.""
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Stewart's work employs bold lines and repeated motif to construct elaborate sketches of Minotaurs, dissected bodies, and heads being impaled by industrial beams, or cut through by ribbon-like objects. He pairs these more violent paintings with ones of flowers and indistinct vegetation painted in the same confident style. There's also a touch of Picasso's cubism, Matisse's fluidity and Keith Haring's neo-expressive style which makes his subjects looks like they are in motion: in Mac's case, mid-morph. His style is surreal yet very tangible. His talent comes from being able to sit on the fence between extremes: fluid and rigid, simple and complex, violent and soothing. The steady theme, however, is the line and what the line can do: It can carve out the grotesque, embrace the beautiful, and move fluidly between the abstract and the real. Stewart's teams of masks, body parts, and dissection pull from his own life.

"We all feel cut up at times, whether it's by isolation or oppression," he says, adding that and ultimately the paintings are about "people's ability to reinvent themselves throughout their lives and how resilient we really are as humans to keep growing and changing."

All accolades aside, Stewart is serious about the future of art in Atlanta. He understands the mechanics at work in Atlanta's market and scene. "Being an artist is a challenge no matter where you live," he says. "The Atlanta art scene has been extremely supportive of my work and of me. I hope to see Atlanta continue to evolve into an arts community that fully embraces and supports the arts and look forward to being part of that."

Stewart says he also understands the importance of involving the youth in the culture and that it is a long-term investment, a pivotal move for the future of the city. He worked on free mural project with Salem Middle School, hoping his interactions with the kids could be a catalyst for a child to become a serious, professional artist. "The Salem Middle School project was me trying to get the youth involved more. And their parents too," Stewart says. "The reward is having a culture in which a kid my age in 20 years will be able to make a living being an artist."

But according to Mac, there's another piece to expanding the Atlanta art scene: respect and self-respect. Since the market is so small, artists and buyers undervalue artwork, he says. Atlanta has introspective, socially relevant art and this is a cultural service that needs to be valued higher than it is currently.

"I know countless artists in Atlanta who do amazing work and they can't sell it because Atlanta's market is so small ... We have a great community here but it's mostly a community of artists and less of people who are supporting the artists," Stewart muses. "If I lived in New York City, I could make a living — no doubt. I've sold more pieces in New York City than in Atlanta."

He's also on the fence about the crowdsourced social media movements — like Free Art Friday ATL (#fafatl) and other arts scavenger hunts — and sees the campaigns as a double-edge sword for Atlanta's creative community. On the one hand, this underground movement raises awareness of artists working in Atlanta but at the same time, it sets a certain value for local art. "I'm a fan and then again I'm not," Stewart says. "Atlanta already has a lot of trouble selling work; we don't need anyone else giving away free paintings ... It does get people aware but it seems almost disrespectful ... Artists want to give their stuff away constantly, and I'm even a victim of that, but I think we undervalue our stuff too much. I know that some people are not going to appreciate it as much because they got it for free."

At the end of the day, it's artists — young artists — such as Stewart, with the social media know-how, autodidact Internet knowledge, determination, and genuine, uninterrupted passion for art will usher in the new generation of culture creators Atlanta. Stewart says there's a train of thought among the new wave of artists who understand not only that art is cool, but also that selling art is cool because it stimulates the market, provides income, and makes people happy. He hopes that more conversations about working artists in the city happen in the future, but admits that it won't be easy if the local painter, muralist, or illustrator turns a blind eye to their community.

"No one is going to care about what your bank statement says ... Money gets me to where I want to be, but the impact you've made on the community comes first," Stewart says. "People will care about your impact on the community. Go out and meet people. Don't waste the time thinking, 'This is going to sell better,' because the work that is going to sell the best is the work that is true to yourself."             13085536 16030197                          Meet Mac Stewart "
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Thursday November 12, 2015 04:00 am EST
Not old enough to drink, the painter and muralist is making his mark on ATL | more...
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  string(3964) "Marcia Vaitsman quickly found out about life's unpredictability after an accident forced her to slow down as an artist and as an individual. The accident left her immobile for two months, forcing her to look inwards. "I could not open the hallway door in my building — and being an active person this changed the rhythm and perception of time too," she says. After Vaitsman started walking again, she attended a 10-day silent retreat with a friend. There, she developed the concept for the show, including the video installation, "10 Days of Isolation."

Vaitsman's new exhibition, Small Acts of Kindness, explores her journey through healing and adapting to her new reality. The show features 22 photography works, taken with a Holga medium format film camera, of cities Vaitsman visited as she started to recover. From New York City to São Paulo, Vaitsman saw kindness in others, their compassion serving as her muse.

Vaitsman spoke to Creative Loafing about recovering with friends, family, and strangers, learning to use a Holga camera, and spending 10 days in isolation.

Tell me about your process behind healing and putting your feelings into your work. What was the inspiration behind the show?

There are two interesting aspects of being forced to slow down. The first is that you kind of become socially transparent. Some friends came to my house and helped me; some sent me messages of support. The majority of people I know never even missed meeting me for the two months when I was lying in bed and the other two months of recovering. The second thing is that many people are willing to help — family, friends, and strangers. One friend took me to the swimming pool. The other woke up to take me to the airport at 5 a.m. Others helped me unconditionally. Strangers helped me in many situations in many cities: Charlotte, New York, Dallas, Asheville, Atlanta, and Brazil. As soon as people saw I had a walking-stick people offered to help. Some people have their reasons not to like to be helped. I did like it, I still do, and I am thankful.

Tell me about what techniques you used on your photography work. Did you learn new techniques for this show?

We used a new photographic paper — a pearl one — so there were technical adjustments. All prints you see in the show were photographed with a Holga. The first shot was taken in 2011. It has been a long process to understand the moods and kindness of this plastic camera. However, I photographed with two different Holgas and both gave me similar results. I sent them to be developed in Rochester, N.Y., but it was hard to predict if I would get an imprint on the negatives or not — the Holga is quite unpredictable. It was also a long process to understand how to best scan Holga negatives. For the exhibition, I choose a type of image that could create this playful and rather abstract mental map from this large Holga archive.

Why were you attracted to old-school cameras?

I have used several old models of cameras, like the Lomo LC-A, the Nikon F3, Lomo Actionsampler, the Holga, and a Keystone 16-millimeter winding film camera. I am fascinated by "machines of seeing," old or new. Each of the old models carry a piece of the history of technology, and carries with it moods and looks from other times.

If you think about the playfulness of psychogeography ... is there a better camera to photograph fake cities, impossible cities, ghost cities, displaced cultures, environmental dioramas, absurd beaches, abandoned palaces like the Holga? When I was recovering I watched the documentary The Institute by Spencer McCall. There was so much playfulness in so much disorientation that somehow it helped me to set the mood to start traveling again and working again. I am enjoying some playful aspects of my new works. The prints you see at Whitespace show a bit of how absurd these contemporary places-spaces are. But the playful part comes from joy and gratitude."
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  string(4141) "Marcia Vaitsman quickly found out about life's unpredictability after an accident forced her to slow down as an artist and as an individual. The accident left her immobile for two months, forcing her to look inwards. "I could not open the hallway door in my building — and being an active person this changed the rhythm and perception of time too," she says. After Vaitsman started walking again, she attended a 10-day silent retreat with a friend. There, she developed the concept for the show, including the video installation, "10 Days of Isolation."

Vaitsman's new exhibition, ''[http://whitespace814.com/artists/marcia-vaitsman/statement/|Small Acts of Kindness]'', explores her journey through healing and adapting to her new reality. The show features 22 photography works, taken with a [http://www.holgacamera.com/|Holga] medium format film camera, of cities Vaitsman visited as she started to recover. From New York City to São Paulo, Vaitsman saw kindness in others, their compassion serving as her muse.

Vaitsman spoke to ''Creative Loafing'' about recovering with friends, family, and strangers, learning to use a Holga camera, and spending 10 days in isolation.

__Tell me about your process behind healing and putting your feelings into your work. What was the inspiration behind the show?__

There are two interesting aspects of being forced to slow down. The first is that you kind of become socially transparent. Some friends came to my house and helped me; some sent me messages of support. The majority of people I know never even missed meeting me for the two months when I was lying in bed and the other two months of recovering. The second thing is that many people are willing to help — family, friends, and strangers. One friend took me to the swimming pool. The other woke up to take me to the airport at 5 a.m. Others helped me unconditionally. Strangers helped me in many situations in many cities: Charlotte, New York, Dallas, Asheville, Atlanta, and Brazil. As soon as people saw I had a walking-stick people offered to help. Some people have their reasons not to like to be helped. I did like it, I still do, and I am thankful.

__Tell me about what techniques you used on your photography work. Did you learn new techniques for this show?__

We used a new photographic paper — a pearl one — so there were technical adjustments. All prints you see in the show were photographed with a Holga. The first shot was taken in 2011. It has been a long process to understand the moods and kindness of this plastic camera. However, I photographed with two different Holgas and both gave me similar results. I sent them to be developed in Rochester, N.Y., but it was hard to predict if I would get [[an] imprint on the negatives or not — the Holga is quite unpredictable. It was also a long process to understand how to best scan Holga negatives. For the exhibition, I choose a type of image that could create this playful and rather abstract mental map from this large Holga archive.

__Why were you attracted to old-school cameras?__

I have used several old models of cameras, like the Lomo LC-A, the Nikon F3, Lomo Actionsampler, the Holga, and a Keystone 16-millimeter winding film camera. I am fascinated by "machines of seeing," old or new. Each of the old models carry a piece of the history of technology, and carries with it moods and looks from other times.

If you think about the playfulness of psychogeography ... is there a better camera to photograph fake cities, impossible cities, ghost cities, displaced cultures, environmental dioramas, absurd beaches, abandoned palaces like the Holga? When I was recovering I watched the documentary ''[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2386327/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1|The Institute]'' by Spencer McCall. There was so much playfulness in so much disorientation that somehow it helped me to set the mood to start traveling again and working again. I am enjoying some playful aspects of my new works. The prints you see at Whitespace show a bit [[of] how absurd these contemporary places-spaces are. But the playful part comes from joy and gratitude."
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  string(4345) "    Recovery from an accident and old-school cameras inspire artist's new exhibition   2015-11-09T09:00:00+00:00 Marcia Vaistman brings "Small Acts of Kindness" to Whitespace ben.eason@creativeloafing.com Ben Eason Muriel Vega 10135279 2015-11-09T09:00:00+00:00  Marcia Vaitsman quickly found out about life's unpredictability after an accident forced her to slow down as an artist and as an individual. The accident left her immobile for two months, forcing her to look inwards. "I could not open the hallway door in my building — and being an active person this changed the rhythm and perception of time too," she says. After Vaitsman started walking again, she attended a 10-day silent retreat with a friend. There, she developed the concept for the show, including the video installation, "10 Days of Isolation."

Vaitsman's new exhibition, Small Acts of Kindness, explores her journey through healing and adapting to her new reality. The show features 22 photography works, taken with a Holga medium format film camera, of cities Vaitsman visited as she started to recover. From New York City to São Paulo, Vaitsman saw kindness in others, their compassion serving as her muse.

Vaitsman spoke to Creative Loafing about recovering with friends, family, and strangers, learning to use a Holga camera, and spending 10 days in isolation.

Tell me about your process behind healing and putting your feelings into your work. What was the inspiration behind the show?

There are two interesting aspects of being forced to slow down. The first is that you kind of become socially transparent. Some friends came to my house and helped me; some sent me messages of support. The majority of people I know never even missed meeting me for the two months when I was lying in bed and the other two months of recovering. The second thing is that many people are willing to help — family, friends, and strangers. One friend took me to the swimming pool. The other woke up to take me to the airport at 5 a.m. Others helped me unconditionally. Strangers helped me in many situations in many cities: Charlotte, New York, Dallas, Asheville, Atlanta, and Brazil. As soon as people saw I had a walking-stick people offered to help. Some people have their reasons not to like to be helped. I did like it, I still do, and I am thankful.

Tell me about what techniques you used on your photography work. Did you learn new techniques for this show?

We used a new photographic paper — a pearl one — so there were technical adjustments. All prints you see in the show were photographed with a Holga. The first shot was taken in 2011. It has been a long process to understand the moods and kindness of this plastic camera. However, I photographed with two different Holgas and both gave me similar results. I sent them to be developed in Rochester, N.Y., but it was hard to predict if I would get an imprint on the negatives or not — the Holga is quite unpredictable. It was also a long process to understand how to best scan Holga negatives. For the exhibition, I choose a type of image that could create this playful and rather abstract mental map from this large Holga archive.

Why were you attracted to old-school cameras?

I have used several old models of cameras, like the Lomo LC-A, the Nikon F3, Lomo Actionsampler, the Holga, and a Keystone 16-millimeter winding film camera. I am fascinated by "machines of seeing," old or new. Each of the old models carry a piece of the history of technology, and carries with it moods and looks from other times.

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Monday November 9, 2015 04:00 am EST
Recovery from an accident and old-school cameras inspire artist's new exhibition | more...
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  string(4079) "On an overcast afternoon in Midtown's arts corridor, the inside of the 1315 Peachtree building is literally buzzing. Kids are talking excitedly, adults are murmuring in amazement, and 3-D printers are making noise as they transform cubes of plastic into tangible products. This is the scene at the Museum of Design Atlanta's (MODA) new exhibit, Designers, Makers, Users: 3D Printing the Future.

MODA's inspiration for the exhibition came a year and a half ago when it first put 3-D printers in its lobby. The museum's staff started teaching classes for adults and kids and was surprised by the response. "We thought the printers would be interesting but we didn't realize how popular they would be," says Laura Flusche, MODA's executive director who also curated the exhibit. "And then, I would say that in just a few months ... we started to realize that people were so interested and they didn't really have a place to get all the information."

As a result, MODA has crafted an original exhibit covering a range of industries that are experimenting with 3-D printing and design, from fashion and architecture to medicine and lunar exploration. It might be common knowledge that you can 3-D print your own wedding ring, but did you know the London architecture firm Foster and Partners believes it could use moon dust to 3-D print living quarters on the moon? This is just one example of many on display in the gallery.

While there are no guided tours, MODA's staff knows the exhibit well and is enthusiastic to answer questions. Neil Miller, a SCAD graduate and MODA's in-house 3-D printing guru, walks from room to room showing visitors cool things they might not have realized on their own. Like a hip science teacher, he shows how easy it is to start one of the half-dozen printers on loan for the exhibit: You choose from a touch screen menu, press start, and watch as the machine goes to work. When it starts, though, it's a little anti-climactic. These 3-D printers are slow and only make things out of hard plastic, but the technology is still in its beginning stages.

"Somebody said to me one day that 3-D printing is at the place that personal computers were in the '80s when we all bought them and used them to make personalized greeting cards and thought that was really awesome. And I think that a little bit, when it comes to individual use of 3-D printing, we still are in that place," Flusche says. "We're still trying to figure out what the right materials are, and how this is going to work."

And yet the exhibit also includes ways 3-D printing is already being put to use.

image-1
In medicine, 3-D printing is enhancing prosthetics. In the past, a prosthetic hand was expensive and made for the masses. Now a company called Robohand is making prosthetic hands and fingers. Its designs are completely open-source, and it has created a volunteer network connecting people who need a prosthetic with others who have the capability to print one in their home. The South African company's U.S. base is in Decatur.

Also on display are 3-D printed shoes from Feetz, a company out of Chattanooga. Does the shoe not fit? By taking a photo of your feet and sending it to Feetz, the company creates customized kicks. Personalized footwear sounds trivial but these shoes can alleviate suffering for people with misshapen feet.

According to Flusche, some families will come in and the kid explains to the parents how the printers work, since they're likely to have been exposed through school or some other outlet. It's impressive to the older generations, but also seems cool to the younger, tech-savvy crowd. And it's young people who are really going to see the benefits of what this technology might achieve. As Flusche puts it, "design is a process where you think up a way to address a challenge. You prototype something, you go out and you test it. Most of the time it doesn't work ... You go back and you try again."

Many of the projects in the exhibit might never happen, but it makes you wonder about where 3-D printing might take us."
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MODA's inspiration for the exhibition came a year and a half ago when it first put 3-D printers in its lobby. The museum's staff started teaching classes for adults and kids and was surprised by the response. "We thought [[the printers] would be interesting but we didn't realize how popular they would be," says Laura Flusche, MODA's executive director who also curated the exhibit. "And then, I would say that in just a few months ... we started to realize that people were so interested and they didn't really have a place to get all the information."

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"Somebody said to me one day that 3-D printing is at the place that personal computers were in the '80s when we all bought them and used them to make personalized greeting cards and thought that was really awesome. And I think that a little bit, when it comes to individual use of 3-D printing, we still are in that place," Flusche says. "We're still trying to figure out what the right materials are, and how this is going to work."

And yet the exhibit also includes ways 3-D printing is already being put to use.

[image-1]
In medicine, 3-D printing is enhancing prosthetics. In the past, a prosthetic hand was expensive and made for the masses. Now a company called [http://robohandus.com/?page_id=9|Robohand] is making prosthetic hands and fingers. Its designs are completely open-source, and it has created a volunteer network connecting people who need a prosthetic with others who have the capability to print one in their home. The South African company's U.S. base is in Decatur.

Also on display are 3-D printed shoes from [http://www.feetz.com/|Feetz], a company out of Chattanooga. Does the shoe not fit? By taking a photo of your feet and sending it to Feetz, the company creates customized kicks. Personalized footwear sounds trivial but these shoes can alleviate suffering for people with misshapen feet.

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  string(4347) "    3-D printing comes alive in MODA's new exhibit   2015-10-06T08:00:00+00:00 Visual Arts - The future is now ben.eason@creativeloafing.com Ben Eason   2015-10-06T08:00:00+00:00  On an overcast afternoon in Midtown's arts corridor, the inside of the 1315 Peachtree building is literally buzzing. Kids are talking excitedly, adults are murmuring in amazement, and 3-D printers are making noise as they transform cubes of plastic into tangible products. This is the scene at the Museum of Design Atlanta's (MODA) new exhibit, Designers, Makers, Users: 3D Printing the Future.

MODA's inspiration for the exhibition came a year and a half ago when it first put 3-D printers in its lobby. The museum's staff started teaching classes for adults and kids and was surprised by the response. "We thought the printers would be interesting but we didn't realize how popular they would be," says Laura Flusche, MODA's executive director who also curated the exhibit. "And then, I would say that in just a few months ... we started to realize that people were so interested and they didn't really have a place to get all the information."

As a result, MODA has crafted an original exhibit covering a range of industries that are experimenting with 3-D printing and design, from fashion and architecture to medicine and lunar exploration. It might be common knowledge that you can 3-D print your own wedding ring, but did you know the London architecture firm Foster and Partners believes it could use moon dust to 3-D print living quarters on the moon? This is just one example of many on display in the gallery.

While there are no guided tours, MODA's staff knows the exhibit well and is enthusiastic to answer questions. Neil Miller, a SCAD graduate and MODA's in-house 3-D printing guru, walks from room to room showing visitors cool things they might not have realized on their own. Like a hip science teacher, he shows how easy it is to start one of the half-dozen printers on loan for the exhibit: You choose from a touch screen menu, press start, and watch as the machine goes to work. When it starts, though, it's a little anti-climactic. These 3-D printers are slow and only make things out of hard plastic, but the technology is still in its beginning stages.

"Somebody said to me one day that 3-D printing is at the place that personal computers were in the '80s when we all bought them and used them to make personalized greeting cards and thought that was really awesome. And I think that a little bit, when it comes to individual use of 3-D printing, we still are in that place," Flusche says. "We're still trying to figure out what the right materials are, and how this is going to work."

And yet the exhibit also includes ways 3-D printing is already being put to use.

image-1
In medicine, 3-D printing is enhancing prosthetics. In the past, a prosthetic hand was expensive and made for the masses. Now a company called Robohand is making prosthetic hands and fingers. Its designs are completely open-source, and it has created a volunteer network connecting people who need a prosthetic with others who have the capability to print one in their home. The South African company's U.S. base is in Decatur.

Also on display are 3-D printed shoes from Feetz, a company out of Chattanooga. Does the shoe not fit? By taking a photo of your feet and sending it to Feetz, the company creates customized kicks. Personalized footwear sounds trivial but these shoes can alleviate suffering for people with misshapen feet.

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Many of the projects in the exhibit might never happen, but it makes you wonder about where 3-D printing might take us.             13085157 15616234                          Visual Arts - The future is now "
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Article

Tuesday October 6, 2015 04:00 am EDT
3-D printing comes alive in MODA's new exhibit | more...
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  string(4142) "It's been two years since we've seen Ann-Marie Manker's often trippy work brighten up the walls of the Whitespace gallery. As a way to prepare and research her current show, El Gallo, Manker returned to Tucson, Ariz. to confront her demons and examine her personal history. There, she found herself attracted to the rainbow colors, specifically the pinks and turquoises, in the Mexican blankets available in the area. Tex-Mex motifs influenced the way she addressed each El Gallo, including the title piece, which features an amalgam of a cowboy, a rooster, the desert, and sort of boogeyman from her past.

??
Manker spoke to CL about the exhibition, revisiting her past, and the psychology of color.

??
You traveled to Arizona to research the concept for this show. Why Arizona and what did you ended up finding there?

??
I lived in Tucson from 1988 to 1990, when I was 18 to 20 years old. I went to the University of Arizona my freshman and sophomore year. During my first semester in college I had a traumatic experience, so I decided for this show to revisit that old wound. I feel like I struck oil by diving into something so personal. My past work indirectly referenced my personal history, but now I have tapped into a resource that is proving to be generous with its offerings of symbols, metaphors, and narrative.

??
Spending time in Tucson was inspiring. The visit didn't trigger any negative emotions. Instead it was a big, vast, beautiful landscape filled with giant saguaro, chollas, and prickly pears. It was so peaceful, with the exception of almost being attacked by a swarm of killer bees. My husband and I filmed the landscape, caves, old western movie sets, and more for the video piece that we created. I also sketched and did some site-specific installations dealing with textiles in the Ajo valley.

??
Tex-Mex culture seems to be heavily represented in the artwork. What attracted you to it?

??
When I think of my cast of characters, they are desert ranch hands and cowboys. The first piece I created, the self-titled "El Gallo," is an amalgam of a cowboy, animal (rooster), and desert landscape. He was my first attempt at drawing my own personal boogey man and became the archetype for all of the other surreal rooster men. And I couldn't help but study a variety of Mexican blankets with their colorific patterns. The inks that I mixed for my screen prints were made by looking at my pink Mexican blanket that I brought back with me to the print studio. The series of five text-based prints looks like a Mexican blanket laid out. As for signifying the phallus in some of the pieces, the cactus and red chili peppers were the perfect objects to use as I commonly associate those items with the desert Southwest.

??
What does "El Gallo" represent? I keep thinking of him as a mythical creature.

??
"El Gallo" is the monster from my past in surreal form and the more realistic versions represent men engaged in bromance putting their brothers before women. When I was drawing "El Gallo," I was sharing my progress with my brother Jamie, who informed me about a "Galipote," which is a mythical shape-shifting monster in Latin American tales. I thought, "Cool, maybe I've tapped into something here with my drawings."

??
For the large surreal drawings, I photographed my coworker, Michael O'Connell, who is the lead figure model at SCAD. He creates really great gestures with his poses. I always work from my own photographs before I begin a drawing. I used watercolors and ink washes as a base in the works and then layered colored pencil on top. I played with the psychology of color in an attempt to emasculate my figures, but I also really love the aesthetics of pastel and rainbow colors. I even used one of my own rooster's tail feathers to match the paint I used for the gallery walls.

??
Speaking of hatchets, "The Arc of Triumph" is such a unique, vibrant piece.

??
The hatchet is the perfect symbol/weapon for slaying "El Gallo," and to me a rainbow can be a source of power that is either fueled by darkness or light. I decided to create a rainbow of hatchets as a symbol of victory over "El Gallo.""
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(4289) "It's been two years since we've seen [http://whitespace814.com/artists/ann-marie-manker/|Ann-Marie Manker]'s often trippy work brighten up the walls of the [http://whitespace814.com/|Whitespace] gallery. As a way to prepare and research her current show, ''El Gallo'', Manker returned to Tucson, Ariz. to confront her demons and examine her personal history. There, she found herself attracted to the rainbow colors, specifically the pinks and turquoises, in the Mexican blankets available in the area. Tex-Mex motifs influenced the way she addressed each ''El Gallo'', including the title piece, which features an amalgam of a cowboy, a rooster, the desert, and sort of boogeyman from her past.

??
Manker spoke to ''CL'' about the exhibition, revisiting her past, and the psychology of color.

??
__You traveled to Arizona to research the concept for this show. Why Arizona and what did you ended up finding there?__

??
I lived in Tucson from 1988 to 1990, when I was 18 to 20 years old. I went to the University of Arizona my freshman and sophomore year. During my first semester in college I had a traumatic experience, so I decided for this show to revisit that old wound. I feel like I struck oil by diving into something so personal. My past work indirectly referenced my personal history, but now I have tapped into a resource that is proving to be generous with its offerings of symbols, metaphors, and narrative.

??
Spending time in Tucson was inspiring. The visit didn't trigger any negative emotions. Instead it was a big, vast, beautiful landscape filled with giant saguaro, chollas, and prickly pears. It was so peaceful, with the exception of almost being attacked by a swarm of killer bees. My husband and I filmed the landscape, caves, old western movie sets, and more for the video piece that we created. I also sketched and did some site-specific installations dealing with textiles in the Ajo valley.

??
__Tex-Mex culture seems to be heavily represented in the artwork. What attracted you to it?__

??
When I think of my cast of characters, they are desert ranch hands and cowboys. The first piece I created, the self-titled "El Gallo," is an amalgam of a cowboy, animal (rooster), and desert landscape. He was my first attempt at drawing my own personal boogey man and became the archetype for all of the other surreal rooster men. And I couldn't help but study a variety of Mexican blankets with their colorific patterns. The inks that I mixed for my screen prints were made by looking at my pink Mexican blanket that I brought back with me to the print studio. The series of five text-based prints looks like a Mexican blanket laid out. As for signifying the phallus in some of the pieces, the cactus and red chili peppers were the perfect objects to use as I commonly associate those items with the desert Southwest.

??
__What does "El Gallo" represent? I keep thinking of him as a mythical creature.__

??
"El Gallo" is the monster from my past in surreal form and the more realistic versions represent men engaged in bromance putting their brothers before women. When I was drawing "El Gallo," I was sharing my progress with my brother Jamie, who informed me about a "[http://www.cuco.com.ar/galipote.htm|Galipote]," which is a mythical shape-shifting monster in Latin American tales. I thought, "Cool, maybe I've tapped into something here with my drawings."

??
For the large surreal drawings, I photographed my coworker, Michael O'Connell, who is the lead figure model at SCAD. He creates really great gestures with his poses. I always work from my own photographs before I begin a drawing. I used watercolors and ink washes as a base in the works and then layered colored pencil on top. I played with the psychology of color in an attempt to emasculate my figures, but I also really love the aesthetics of pastel and rainbow colors. I even used one of my own rooster's tail feathers to match the paint I used for the gallery walls.

??
__Speaking of hatchets, "The Arc of Triumph" is such a unique, vibrant piece.__

??
The hatchet is the perfect symbol/weapon for slaying "El Gallo," and to me a rainbow can be a source of power that is either fueled by darkness or light. I decided to create a rainbow of hatchets as a symbol of victory over "El Gallo.""
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??
Manker spoke to CL about the exhibition, revisiting her past, and the psychology of color.

??
You traveled to Arizona to research the concept for this show. Why Arizona and what did you ended up finding there?

??
I lived in Tucson from 1988 to 1990, when I was 18 to 20 years old. I went to the University of Arizona my freshman and sophomore year. During my first semester in college I had a traumatic experience, so I decided for this show to revisit that old wound. I feel like I struck oil by diving into something so personal. My past work indirectly referenced my personal history, but now I have tapped into a resource that is proving to be generous with its offerings of symbols, metaphors, and narrative.

??
Spending time in Tucson was inspiring. The visit didn't trigger any negative emotions. Instead it was a big, vast, beautiful landscape filled with giant saguaro, chollas, and prickly pears. It was so peaceful, with the exception of almost being attacked by a swarm of killer bees. My husband and I filmed the landscape, caves, old western movie sets, and more for the video piece that we created. I also sketched and did some site-specific installations dealing with textiles in the Ajo valley.

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Tex-Mex culture seems to be heavily represented in the artwork. What attracted you to it?

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When I think of my cast of characters, they are desert ranch hands and cowboys. The first piece I created, the self-titled "El Gallo," is an amalgam of a cowboy, animal (rooster), and desert landscape. He was my first attempt at drawing my own personal boogey man and became the archetype for all of the other surreal rooster men. And I couldn't help but study a variety of Mexican blankets with their colorific patterns. The inks that I mixed for my screen prints were made by looking at my pink Mexican blanket that I brought back with me to the print studio. The series of five text-based prints looks like a Mexican blanket laid out. As for signifying the phallus in some of the pieces, the cactus and red chili peppers were the perfect objects to use as I commonly associate those items with the desert Southwest.

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What does "El Gallo" represent? I keep thinking of him as a mythical creature.

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"El Gallo" is the monster from my past in surreal form and the more realistic versions represent men engaged in bromance putting their brothers before women. When I was drawing "El Gallo," I was sharing my progress with my brother Jamie, who informed me about a "Galipote," which is a mythical shape-shifting monster in Latin American tales. I thought, "Cool, maybe I've tapped into something here with my drawings."

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For the large surreal drawings, I photographed my coworker, Michael O'Connell, who is the lead figure model at SCAD. He creates really great gestures with his poses. I always work from my own photographs before I begin a drawing. I used watercolors and ink washes as a base in the works and then layered colored pencil on top. I played with the psychology of color in an attempt to emasculate my figures, but I also really love the aesthetics of pastel and rainbow colors. I even used one of my own rooster's tail feathers to match the paint I used for the gallery walls.

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Speaking of hatchets, "The Arc of Triumph" is such a unique, vibrant piece.

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The hatchet is the perfect symbol/weapon for slaying "El Gallo," and to me a rainbow can be a source of power that is either fueled by darkness or light. I decided to create a rainbow of hatchets as a symbol of victory over "El Gallo."             13085077 15507304                          Ann-Marie Manker"s "El Gallo" explores bromance and Tex-Mex "
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Tuesday September 29, 2015 04:00 am EDT
Artist talks about new show at Whitespace Gallery, and her personal boogeyman | more...